Home > Calvinism, Christian Institutes > The revelation given to us through the Creation renders us inexcusable before God

The revelation given to us through the Creation renders us inexcusable before God

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015Our conduct altogether inexcusable, the dullness of perception being attributable to ourselves, while we are fully reminded of the true path, both by the structure and the government of the world.

15. But though we are deficient in natural powers which might enable us to rise to a pure and clear knowledge of God, still, as the dullness which prevents us is within, there is no room for excuse. We cannot plead ignorance, without being at the same time convicted by our own consciences both of sloth and ingratitude. It were, indeed, a strange defense for man to pretend that he has no ears to hear the truth, while dumb creatures have voices loud enough to declare it; to allege that he is unable to see that which creatures without eyes demonstrate, to excuse himself on the ground of weakness of mind, while all creatures without reason are able to teach. Wherefore, when we wander and go astray, we are justly shut out from every species of excuse, because all things point to the right path. But while man must bear the guilt of corrupting the seed of divine knowledge so wondrously deposited in his mind, and preventing it from bearing good and genuine fruit, it is still most true that we are not sufficiently instructed by that bare and simple, but magnificent testimony which the creatures bear to the glory of their Creator. For no sooner do we, from a survey of the world, obtain some slight knowledge of Deity, than we pass by the true God, and set up in his stead the dream and phantom of our own brain, drawing away the praise of justice, wisdom, and goodness, from the fountain-head, and transferring it to some other quarter. Moreover, by the erroneous estimate we form, we either so obscure or pervert his daily works, as at once to rob them of their glory and the author of them of his just praise.

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 5-Henry Beveridge Translation 

  1. September 25, 2013 at 6:50 am

    Reblogged this on My Delight and My Counsellors.

  2. September 25, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    Curious, what do you think about Presuppositional apologetics? Do you see some validity?

    • September 25, 2013 at 1:02 pm

      I have studied classical apologetics through lectures and books, but am not as familiar with presuppositional apologetics; except only in refutations of it by classical apologists. I have been meaning to study some into that area of apologetics, but haven’t gotten around to it.

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