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Archive for January, 2014

Brief survey of the history of hermeneutics – 9. Middle Ages (II)

January 28, 2014 2 comments

Four-fold method (quadriga): Of the many things the era of the Middle Ages is known for, one of its most important contributions to biblical interpretation came from John Cassian (circa 360-435). Cassian inherited the theory of the three senses of Scripture from his Patristic predecessors. Origen had developed the three-fold sense of Scripture – the literal (historical or somatic), the tropological (moral or pneumatic), and the allegorical (doctrinal or psychical). Cassian added a fourth – the mystical, analogical or ultimate/eschatological sense.[1] Augustine (circa 354-430) utilized a form of the four-fold method and his book On Christian Doctrine became “the volume which was to be the basic hermeneutical manual of the Middle Ages.”[2]

The medieval quadriga or fourfold pattern of meaning was comprised of the following: the literal or historical, the tropological or moral, the allegorical or doctrinal, and the anagogical or ultimate/eschatological.[3] Muller comments on the quadriga:

 

Read the entire article here.

Those who teach the Charismatic doctrines of Divine Healing will make us raise questions to their interpretations of God’s Word

January 28, 2014 5 comments

PinkBut what of their teaching on “Divine healing?” Is it scriptural or unscriptural? This is a question which it is not easy to answer in a single sentence. Many passages on healing may be cited from God’s Word, but that raises the question of their interpretation—in accord with the context and also in harmony with the general Analogy of Faith: as it also calls for a careful examination of all inferences drawn from and conclusions based upon those passages. Moreover, these modern cults who stress “Divine healing” are by no means uniform in their teaching thereon, some being more radical and extreme than others, so that the refutation of one erroneous presentation of this subject would not hold good of a similar error in an entirely different dress. Though familiar with all the principal varieties of them, we do not propose to waste the reader’s time by taking them up seriatim but rather deal with the broad principles which apply to them all.

Arthur W. Pink-Divine Healing-Is It Scriptural?

My comment: Notice that Pink here recognized in his day that some Charismatics held doctrines that were extreme or that were far removed from the common Charismatic doctrines in most circles. We see this today in the ‘prosperity gospel movement’ and ‘the word of faith movement.’ This is why the ‘Strange Fire Conference’ generated so much controversy because not all Pentecostal/Charismatics hold to these extreme positions. Nevertheless, Pink doesn’t deal with the extreme movements, but attacks the doctrines that are common to the whole movement. 

The Prosperity Gospel Refuted

January 27, 2014 3 comments

Download the 9Marks Journal for Jan-Feb and read some articles that refute the prosperity gospel which is being preached in churches around the world.

To show you what you will find in this journal, I will list an article under the category in which it is found inside the journal:

 

Discovering the Prosperity Gospel

The Rise of a Parallel, Post-Biblical Christianity By Grant Retief

The fact that South Africa is a churched nation doesn’t mean it’s a gospeled nation. Read more >

 

Analyzing the Prosperity Gospel

The Soil of the Prosperity Gospel By Jonathan Baer

The prosperity gospel is the bitter harvest of an ancient seed planted in modern soil. Read more >

 

Responding to the Prosperity Gospel

Do You Know What Your Missionaries Actually Teach? By Sean DeMars

Love the gospel, protect it, and guard it. And for the love of all things good and holy, please stop sending missionaries if they don’t. Read more >

 

Prosperity Gospel Book Reviews

Book Review: Break Out!, by Joel Osteen Reviewed by Bob Johnson

Joel Osteen, Break Out! 5 Keys to Go Beyond Your Barriers and Live an Extraordinary Life. FaithWords, 2013. 243 pages. $26.00 Read more >

 

Other Book Reviews

Book Review: Preaching: A Biblical Theology, by Jason Meyer Reviewed by Bobby Jamieson

Jason C. Meyer, Preaching: A Biblical Theology. Crossway, 2013. 368 pages. $22.99 I hate to say it, but my impression is that much—most?—of what goes by the name of expository preaching isn’t actually expository preaching. More like expo-lite. Read more >

 

Read these articles and many more by downloading the 9Marks journal.

This journal can be downloaded in Pdf, Epub, or Mobi (for Kindle)

Arminians today are just as relentlessly opposed to the absolute sovereignty of God

January 27, 2014 4 comments

Arminianism was not more rampant than it is now in England, Scotland, and our own North American continent. Let us not think that the malignant spirit of persecution that moved the Arminians—led by Bishop Sydserff, Archbishop Laud, and others—died at the end of the Covenanting struggles of long ago. The Arminians of today hold precisely the same false doctrines, and are just as relentlessly opposed to the absolute sovereignty of God and unconditional election as were the Arminians of old.” (The Contender—Nova Scotia, April, 1955.)

William MacLean-Arminianism-Another Gospel

Why do some Paedobaptists sound like Particular Baptists?

Benjamin Keach’s Definition of Drunkenness

Not one of the elect can perish, but they must all necessarily be saved

January 24, 2014 1 comment

Chapter III

CONCERNING ELECTION UNTO LIFE, OR PREDESTINATION AS IT RESPECTS THE SAINTS IN PARTICULAR

HAVING considered predestination as it regards all men in general, and briefly shown that by it some are appointed to wrath and others to obtain salvation by Jesus Christ (1Th 5:9), I now come to consider, more distinctly, that branch of it which relates to the saints only, and is commonly styled election. Its definition I have given already in the close of the first chapter. What I have farther to advance, from the Scriptures, on this important subject, I shall reduce to several positions, and subjoin a short explanation and confirmation of each.

POSITION 4. -Not one of the elect can perish, but they must all necessarily be saved. The reason is this: because God simply and unchangeably wills that all and every one of those whom He hath appointed to life should be eternally glorified, and, as was observed towards the end of the preceding chapter, all the Divine attributes are concerned in the accomplishment of this His will. His wisdom, which cannot err; His knowledge, which cannot be deceived; His truth, which cannot fail; His love, which nothing can alienate; His justice, which cannot condemn any for whom Christ died; His power, which none can resist; and His unchangeableness, which can never vary – from all which it appears that we do not speak at all improperly when we say that the salvation of His people is necessary and certain. Now that is said to be necessary (quod nequit aliter esse) which cannot be otherwise than it is, and if all the perfections of God are engaged to preserve and save His children, their safety and salvation must be, in the strictest sense of the word, necessary. (See Psalms 103:17; 125:1,2; Isa 45:17; 54:9,10; Jer 31:38,32. 40; John 6:39; 10:28,29; 14:19; 17:12; Rom 8:30,38,39; 11:29; 1Co 1:8,9; Phi 1:6; 1 Peter 1:4,5).

Thus St. Augustine:* “Of those whom God hath predestinated none can perish, inasmuch as they are His own elect,” and ib., “They are the elect who are predestinated, foreknown, and called according to purpose. Now, could any of these be lost, God would be disappointed of His will and expectation; but He cannot be so disappointed, therefore they can never perish. Again, could they be lost, the power of God would be made void by man’s sin, but His power is invincible, therefore they are safe.” And again (chap. 9), “The children of God are written, with an unshaken stability, in the book of their heavenly Father’s remembrance.” And in the same chapter he hath these words: “Not the children of promise, but the children of perdition shall perish, for the former are the predestinated, who are called according to the Divine determination, not one of whom shall finally miscarry.” So likewise Luther+: “God’s decree of predestination is firm and certain, and the necessity resulting from it is, in like manner, immoveable, and cannot but take place. For we ourselves are so feeble that, if the matter was left in our hands, very few, or rather none, would be saved, but Satan would overcome us all.” To which he adds: “Now, since this steadfast and inevitable purpose of God cannot be reversed nor disannulled by any creature whatever, we have a most assured hope that we shall finally triumph over sin, how violently soever it may at present rage in our mortal bodies.”

* Tom. 7, De Corr. et Grat. cap. 7.

+ In Praefat. ad Epist. ad Rom.

Jerome Zanchius-The Doctrine of Absolute Predestination Stated and Asserted-Translated by Augustus Montague Toplady