Home > Worship > The Regulative Principle of the Church 18: Its Contemporary Objections (Part 3)

The Regulative Principle of the Church 18: Its Contemporary Objections (Part 3)

A third common objection nowadays to the regulative principle is this.

(3) It involves the acceptance of extreme practices like exclusive psalmody and non-instrumentalism.

The implication is often present in materials that argue for the rejection of the regulative principle to the acceptance of extreme practices like exclusive psalmody and non-instrumentalism.1 It cannot be denied that these practices have frequently been associated with the regulative principle in history. Neither can it be denied that those who hold these views are disposed to press the regulative principle in support of their views. Nevertheless, it appears to me that several cogent responses can be made to this argument.

First, it is guilty of a logical fallacy. The frequent association of two ideas does not prove that they are logically related by good and necessary consequence. For instance, the doctrine of original sin is closely associated with the doctrine of infant baptism historically, but this does not prove (at least to any Reformed Baptists) nor should it prove that the doctrine of original sin leads to infant baptism.

 

 

Read the entire article here.

 

This is the final installment to this series and all the links to this series can be found here. They were put up by our friend Jason Deligo over at Confessingbaptist.com

  1. July 8, 2014 at 9:20 am

    Reblogged this on My Delight and My Counsellors.

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