Home > Theology > Why Theological Study Is for Everyone

Why Theological Study Is for Everyone

Mention the terms ‘theology’ or ‘theologian’ around most Christians and they will immediately go into a defensive position against these terms. I once was explaining a doctrine to a certain Christian lady and I simply stated, “Most Theologians believe….” and before I could finish she cut me off by stating, “I don’t like Theologians.” This attitude against the terms ‘theology’ and ‘theologians’ is prevalent among Charismatic/Pentecostals, who believe that the mind is not to be engaged when studying scripture, but instead the Holy Spirit just drops knowledge into you as you progress in your Christian life.

However, anyone who begins studying about God is studying theology and could be called a Theologian. They may not be a theologian in the professional sense of the term, but nevertheless they are still engaged in theology.

This is why I am pointing you to a good article by Jared C. Wilson. In this article Jared explains what the term ‘theology’ means and give three primary reasons why every Christian ought to be a theologian.

Here is a quote from the article:

Every Christian must be a theologian. In a variety of ways, this is something I tell my church often. And the looks I get from some surprised souls are the evidence that I have not yet adequately communicated that the purposeful theological study of God by lay people is important.

Many times the confused responses come from a misunderstanding of what is meant in this context by theology. So I tell my church what I don’t mean. When I say every Christian must be a theologian, I don’t mean that every Christian must be an academic or that every Christian must be a scholar or that every Christian must work hard at giving the impression of being a know-it-all. We all basically understand what is meant in the biblical warning that “knowledge puffs up” (1 Cor. 8:1). Nobody likes an egghead.

But the answer to formal scholasticism or dry intellectualism is not a neglect of theological study. Laypeople have no biblical warrant to leave the duty of doctrine up to pastors and professors alone. Therefore, I remind my church that theology—coming from the Greek words theos (God) and logos (word)—simply means “the knowledge (or study) of God.” If you’re a Christian, you must by definition know God. Christians are disciples of Jesus; they are student-followers of Jesus. The longer we follow Him, the more we learn about Him and, consequently, the more deeply we come to know Him.

 

To continue reading the article click here.

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  1. August 28, 2014 at 1:51 pm

    Welcome to my blog. Thank you for reading and reblogging. Blessings.

  1. August 28, 2014 at 1:52 am
  2. July 15, 2015 at 12:52 pm

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