Home > Hermeneutics > The interpreters task is to expound the word of God clearly, so the congregation can understand what it is saying

The interpreters task is to expound the word of God clearly, so the congregation can understand what it is saying

Arthur PinkIf the druggist is required by law to follow exactly the doctor’s prescription, if military officers must transmit the orders of their commanders verbatim or suffer severe penalties, how much more incumbent is it for one dealing with Divine and eternal things to adhere strictly to his text book! The interpreter’s task is to emulate those described in Nehemiah 8:8, of whom it is said “they read in the book in the law of the Lord God distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading.” The reference is to those who had returned to Palestine from Babylon. While in captivity they had gradually ceased to use Hebrew as their spoken language. Aramaic displacing it. Hence there was a real need to explain the Hebrew words in which the Law was written (cf. Nehemiah 13:23, 24). Yet the recording of this incident intimates that it is of permanent importance, and has a message for us. In the good providence of God there is little need today for the preacher to explain the Hebrew and the Creek, since we already possess a reliable translation of them into our own mother tongue—though occasionally, yet very sparingly, he may do so. But his principal business is to “give the sense” of the English Bible and cause his hearers to “understand” its contents. His responsibility is to adhere strictly to that injunction,

“let him speak My word faithfully. What is the chaff of the wheat? saith the Lord” (Jeremiah 23:28).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

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  1. January 27, 2015 at 7:47 am

    Reblogged this on My Delight and My Counsellors.

  2. January 27, 2015 at 8:31 am

    Reblogged this on Talmidimblogging.

  3. January 30, 2015 at 3:23 am

    Amen!

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