Archive

Archive for March, 2017

Free Ebook- Faiths Checkbook

March 31, 2017 2 comments

This is a day to day devotional that was put out by Charles H. Spurgeon. You can download the free ebook by clicking the link below.

 

Download (Pdf)

An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith- Appendix Point 8

8. Though all our workings for life be in vain, irregular, and not accepted of God, (Jesus Christ being our life, Who is freely given to us of God,) yet we believe and know that being made partakers of Jesus Christ, we do, and shall, and must, through Him, and walking in Him, bring forth the fruit of good works, serving God (in true obedience, and love, and thankfulness unto Him) in holiness and righteousness, being His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which He hath before ordained that we should walk in them; Eph. 2:10; Luke 1:74,75.

Benjamin Cox- An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith

Resolving Problems in Colossians 2:16-17

by James M. Renihan

Colossians 2:16 (NKJV): So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or sabbaths, 17 which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.

This passage is, at first glance, the strongest that speaks against a ‘sabbath’ in the New Testament, and we must give to it the full weight it deserves.We have no right to make it less direct than it is; we must treat it carefully, and follow wherever it leads us. Any other treatment undermines our claims of respect for the inspired and inerrant word of God.

At first glance, it appears to indicate that there is no Sabbath-keeping for New Covenant believers, and this is a problem for all of us who profess to believe that there is a day to be kept holy unto the Lord. We cannot pretend that this text does not exist; we cannot blink our eyes when reading the chapter; we cannot skip over…

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 110

To [Mr. W. Higgs, Sen.].

MENTONE, Thursday, Dec. 4, ‘90.

DEAR FRIEND,—

You are a delight to me at every remembrance of you. Receive my love, and give as much of it as you like to your wife, your mother, and your sisters and all the clan.

I thank you for entertaining our friends at the Baths. May more come next Sunday.

My hand is not yet so light as it should be, and to write is a painful task. Still it is better, or I could not be scribbling this screed. I sleep nicely, and have been out driving most days, and so I am mending soundly if not swiftly. I have had a hard grind, and I hope it will sharpen me. I wish I could see you.

Remember me to every deacon. I cannot yet write much; will they take it as done until this unworthy right hand gets well.

I like to hear how all goes on. Stir up brethren to write. T. O. sent a very cheering telegram. J P___ nice letter.

My dear wife seems out of the world rather. She has felt the cold bitterly.

It rains to-day, and Mrs. Bernard laughs because I propose to pay her only when the sun shines!

God bless you and yours.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

The Wednesday Word: The Wonderful Number 7

There is something magnificent about the number seven in Scripture.

It is the number of completeness, perfection and rest.

Consider these sevens:

There were 7 days of creation.

There are 7 days of the week.

It was the 7th animal that was sacrificed at Noah’s sacrifice.

Joshua marched around Jericho 7 times.

7 priests with 7 trumpets also marched around Jericho.

On the 7th day, they trooped around the walls 7 times.

Naaman washed 7 times in the Jordan.

Elijah prayed 7 times.

Every 7th day was a Sabbath.

Every 7th year was a Sabbath year.

Every 7 times 7 years was a year of Jubilee.

Three of the feasts of Israel lasted 7 days.

Between the first and second feasts, there were 7 days.

There were 7 days of the feast of Passover.

Jesus is the seven-fold “I AM.”

There are 7 petitions in the Lord’s Prayer.

7 loaves were multiplied into 7 basketfuls.

Jesus performed 7 miracles on the Sabbath.

The term “First and the Last” is used 7 times.

There are 7 seals in the Book of Revelation.

There were 7 churches,

7 candlesticks,

7 stars,

7 spirits before the throne of God.

Before His crucifixion, Christ passed through 7 trials.

There were 7 accusations against Him.

There were 7 questions from Pilate to Christ, and there were 7 sayings from the cross.

In the book of Hebrews, seven titles refer to Christ.

1) He is the Heir of all things (Hebrews 1:2),

2) The Captain of our salvation (2:10),

3) The Apostle (3:1),

4) The ‘Author of salvation (5:9),

5) The Forerunner (6:20),

6) The High Priest (10:21)

7) The Author and finisher of our faith (12:2).

What a seven-fold declaration of His perfection.

Then in Revelation 5:6 “…, lo, in the midst of the throne …stood a Lamb as it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent forth into all the earth.”

Again, note the number 7. Observe how the Lamb had seven horns. The horn was a symbol of authority and strength and being that there are seven horns, we are being pointed to the perfect power and omnipotence of the Lord Jesus. Christ is omnipotent and is, therefore, God! Only He who is omnipotent can exert supremacy.

The seven eyes present a picture of the Lamb’s perfect Omniscience. This language corresponds directly with Zechariah 3:9 and 4:10, where we encounter God’s omniscience displayed by the seven eyes. God knows everything; He is Omniscient! Let’s face it; if He didn’t know everything, He wouldn’t be much of a God! He would be a very limited sort of a fellow and certainly no one to whom we could bring our deepest concerns and questions. If indeed God does not know all things I, for one, would be in a panic for who then could shepherd me?

Spurgeon tells the story of how a great Grecian artist was fashioning an image for a temple and was diligently carving the back part of the goddess. Someone said to him, “You need not finish that part of the statue because it is to be built into the wall.”

He replied, “The gods can see in the wall.”

The artist had the wrong God but the right idea of omniscience. The Lord Christ sees everything; He’s Omniscient.

The Seven Spirits sent forth are a declaration of Christ’s Omnipresence!

As you know, Omnipresence is one of the mighty attributes of God (Isaiah 66:1). Although God is not referred to directly in scripture as being Omnipresent, we know that His omnipresence is related to His omnipotence and omniscience. All three of these attributes work in concert. The fact that He is everywhere (omnipresent) means He knows everything (omniscience) and that He is everywhere (omnipresent) establishes that there is nowhere from which His power is excluded (omnipotence).

We are saved by He who is perfect.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

Duty of Living and Walking in the Holy Spirit: Introduction- Book Sixth

Book Sixth

INTRODUCTION.

DUTY OF LIVING AND WALKING IN THE HOLY SPIRIT.[1]

We live, move, and have our being in God. His presence is ever with us; and by his power, we are, at every moment, upheld in being, and faculties and powers, from which all movements corporeal or mental, proceed, are preserved in existence and action. Such is our constant and immediate dependence on God. We are, in like manner and degree, dependent on the Holy Spirit, for the existence of spiritual life, and for the faculties and powers necessary to all spiritual action. Our dependence on the Holy Spirit extends still further. The very disposition to holy action, proceeds from the Spirit; and the production of this disposition, is his peculiar work in sanctification. In our natural actions, we live and move in God; in our spiritual actions, we live and walk in the Holy Spirit.

The Scripture representations of our dependence on the Holy Spirit, are full and strong. Our spiritual life comes from him, for it is the spirit that quickeneth;[2] and he is called the Spirit of Life.[3] When the prophet saw the dead bones in the valley, he prayed: “Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live;”[4] and the spirit of life entered into them. So souls, dead in trespasses and sins, are quickened by the Holy Spirit. And we live in the Holy Spirit as dependent on him for spiritual life, as the body is dependent for animal life on the atmosphere which we breathe. Hence proceed the earnest prayers, that the Holy Spirit may be granted, and may not be taken away.[5] And hence the bestowment of the Holy Spirit is regarded as the giving of all good.[6] The importance of the Holy Spirit’s influence in the exercises of the spiritual life, may be inferred from such passages as the following: “Led by the Spirit;”[7] “Mind the things of the Spirit;”[8] “Filled with the Spirit;”[9] “The Spirit lusteth against the flesh;”[10] “If ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live:”[11] “The Spirit helpeth our infirmity:”[12] “Changed into the same image by the Spirit;”[13] “The Spirit beareth witness with our spirits.”[14]

No believer, who has any just sense of his dependence on the Holy Spirit, for the divine life which he enjoys, and all its included blessings, can be indifferent towards the Agent by whom all this good is bestowed. He cannot willingly “grieve the Holy Spirit, by whom he is sealed to the day of redemption.” He will seek to know, in all things, what is the mind of the Spirit; and, to him, the communion of the Holy Spirit will be the sweetest foretaste of heaven, that can be enjoyed on earth. And to him, therefore, the study of the Holy Spirit’s character and office, will be a source of delight.

[1] Gal. v. 25. If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.

[2] John vi. 63.

[3] Rom. viii. 2.

[4] Ex. xxxvii. 9.

[5] Ps. li. 11, 12.

[6] Compare Matt. vii. 11 with Luke xi. 13.

[7] Gal. v. 18.

[8] Rom. viii. 5.

[9] Eph v. 18.

[10] Gal. v. 17.

[11] Rom. viii. 13.

[12] Rom. viii. 26.

[13] 2 Cor. iii. 18.

[14] Rom. viii. 16.

John L. Dagg- Manual of Theology

Fuller and the Atonement (Part 1): “It is Enough that Jesus Died”

by Tom Nettles

Editorial note: This is the fourth post in a series on Andrew Fuller’s theology. Here is the series so far: Fuller the Non-Calvinist? (Part 1), Fullerite: Doctrine of Inability (Part 2), Fuller and Irresistible Grace (Part 3), Fuller and the Atonement – 1/4 (Part 4), Fuller and the Atonement – 2/4 (Part 5), Fuller and the Atonement – 3/4 (Part 6), and Fuller and the Atonement 4/4 (Part 7).

Fuller“The Son of God appeared—took our nature, obeyed the law, and endured the curse, and hereby made full and proper atonement for the sins of his own elect.” So confessed Fuller in 1783 at his installment as pastor at Kettering. In Fuller’s discussion of the atonement in 1785 in the first edition of The Gospel Worthy, subheaded as “Concerning Particular Redemption,” Fuller pointed to an objection based on the supposed absurdity that “God can have made it the duty of any man to believe in Christ for the salvation of his soul, or that he can have promised salvation to him on his so believing, when all the while his salvation was not the end for which he died.”i The Table of Contents described his argument in these words: “If faith were a believing Chirst [sic] died for me in particular, this objection would be unanswerable.” The second statement of the summary asserted, “No necessity for the party knowing his particular interest in Christ’s death in order to believe in him, or for his having any such interest to render it his duty.” Fuller’s basic argument in the first edition is that, at the time….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Churches, Get a Calvinist Pastor!

March 28, 2017 2 comments

Tom Nettles

Southern Baptists inherited the most compelling aspects of all the Baptist Calvinists that preceded them. James P. Boyce summarized this well. He encouraged every preacher to get theological education in some way, even if it could not be at the Seminary in Greenville, South Carolina. If no other means were available, he advised, “work at it yourself.” The fathers of the convention did this, Boyce claimed; “They familiarized themselves with the Bible, and Gill and Andrew Fuller, and they made good and effective preachers. God is able to raise up others like them.”1 The irony of Boyce’s appeal to the grassroots for support of theological education was this: the seminary would not interrupt, but would perpetuate, the work of pastoral ministry, preaching and theology consistent with the Gill/Fuller tradition.

But this is the very difficulty that we face at this moment in Southern Baptist history. God indeed is raising up others like them, that is,….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The Holy Spirit’s use of words:Example 3

What has just been before us leads us to point out that the only sure and satisfactory way of settling the old controversy between the Protestant and popish theologians as to whether the word “justify” means to make just or to pronounce just is to ascertain how the term is used by the sacred writers, for an appeal to Holy Writ does not leave the issue in the slightest doubt. In the first place, when we are said to “glorify God” we do not render Him glorious, but announce that He is so. When we are bidden to sanctify the Lord God in our hearts (1 Peter 3:15), we do not make Him holy, but assert that He is so. Equally, when it is said

“that Thou mightest be justified when Thou speakest, and be clear when Thou judgest” (Psalm 51:4),

the force of it is that Thou mightest be pronounced righteous in Thy judicial verdicts. In none of these instances is there the least ambiguity or uncertainty, in none is there any transformation wrought in the object of the verb—to suggest so would be horrible blasphemy. When wisdom is said to be “justified of her children” (Matthew 11:19) it obviously signifies that she is vindicated by them. Nor does the word have any different force when it is applied to the sinner’s acceptance with God.

In the second place, it is to be noted that in many passages justification is placed over against condemnation. The meaning of a term is often perceived by weighing the one that is placed in opposition to it—as “destroy” is over against “fulfill” in Matthew 5:17.

“If there be a controversy between men, and they come unto judgment, that the judges may judge them; then they shall justify the righteous, and condemn the wicked” (Deuteronomy 25:1).

“He that justifieth the wicked, and he that condemneth the just, even they both are abomination to the Lord” (Proverbs 17:15).

“For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned” (Matthew 12:37).

Thus the forensic sense of the term is definitely established, for in those and similar passages two judicial sentences are mentioned which are exactly the reverse of each other. As to condemn a man “is not to make him unrighteous”, but is simply the pronouncing of an adverse sentence against him, so to justify is to not to effect any moral improvement in his character, but is simply declaring him to be righteous. The word is still further explained by Romans 3:19, 20:

“that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become [be brought in] guilty before God: Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in His sight,”

where guilt and non-justification are synonymous.

But in all generations Satan and his agents have labored to make men believe that when Scripture speaks of God’s justifying sinners it signifies the making of men righteous by means of something which is infused into them, or else produced by them; thereby dishonoring Christ. The early chapters of Romans are devoted to an exposition of this all-important truth.

First, it is shown that “there is none righteous” (3:10), none who measures up to the Law’s requirements.

Second, that God has provided a perfect righteousness in and by Christ, and that this is revealed in the Gospel (1:16, 17;3:21, 22).

Third, that this righteousness, or vicarious obedience, of Christ is imputed or reckoned to the account of those who believe (4:11, 24).

Fourth, that since God has placed to the credit of the believing sinner the fulfillment of the Law by his Substitute, he is justified (5:1, 18).

Fifth, therefore none can lay anything to his charge (8:33). Thus may the believing sinner exultantly exclaim, “In the Lord have I righteousness and strength” (Isaiah 45:24), “I will greatly rejoice in the Lord, my soul shall be joyful in my God; for He hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, He hath covered me with the robe of righteousness” (Isaiah 61:10). “I will go in the strength of the Lord God: I will make mention of Thy righteousness, even of Thine only” (Psalm 71:16).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Menno Simons

March 27, 2017 2 comments

Menno Simons was born in Friesland, Holland. Little is known of his early life and education. In 1524 he was ordained to the priesthood of the Roman Catholic Church; however, his study of the New Testament produced some doubts concerning many of the Roman doctrines. Luther’s writings influenced him to leave the Roman Church. Simons’ preaching thereafter is described as evangelical rather than sacramental.

Simons went farther than either Luther or Calvin in rejecting the teachings of Romanism and he identified himself with the Dutch Anabaptists. He was baptized in 1537 by Obbe Philip. His fame as a writer and as a preacher grew, and soon the Anabaptists of that area acknowledged him as their leader.

In his church discipline, which was drawn from the Swiss Baptists, silent prayer was common, and sermons were without texts. He taught that neither Baptism nor Communion conferred grace upon an individual, but that grace was obtained only through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. His preaching and influence were such that many of the Dutch Anabaptists adopted his name and thereafter were known as Mennonites.

 

Source [Reformed Reader]