Home > Gospel > Multiplied also are the cases where disappointment and defeat have crushed the spirits

Multiplied also are the cases where disappointment and defeat have crushed the spirits

Multiplied also are the cases where disappointment and defeat have crushed the spirits. The soldier fighting for his country may see the ranks broken, but he will not be broken in heart, so long as there remains a single hope for victory. His comrade reels behind him, and he himself is wounded, but with a shout he cries, “On! on!” and scales the ramparts. Sword in hand, still he goes carrying terror amongst the foe, himself sustained by the prospect of victory; but let him once hear the shout of defeat where he hoped for triumph, let him know that the banner is stained in the earth, that the eagle has been snatched from the standard, let him once hear it said, “they fly, they fly,” let him see the officers and soldiers flying in confusion; let him be well assured that the most heroic courage, and the most desperate velour are of no avail, then his heart bursteth under a sense of dishonor, and he is almost content to die because the honor of his country has been tarnished, and her glory has been stained in the dust. Of this the soldiers of Britain know but little-may they speedily carve out a peace for us with their victorious swords. Truly in the great conflict of life we can bear anything but defeat. Toils on toils would we endure to climb a summit, but if we must die ere we reached it, that were a brokenness of heart indeed. To accomplish the object on which we have set our minds, we would spend our very heart’s blood; but once let us see that our life’s purpose is not to be accomplished, let us, when we hoped to grasp the crown see that it is withdrawn, or other hands have seized it, then cometh brokenness of heart; but let us remember, whether we have been broken in heart by penury or by defeat, that there is a hand which “bindeth up the broken in heart, and healeth all their wounds,” that even these natural breakings are regarded by Jehovah, who in the plentitude of his mercy, giveth a balm for every wound to every one of his people. We need not ask, “Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician there!” There is a balm, there is a physician who can heal all these natural wounds, who can give joy to the troubled countenance, take the furrow from the brow, wipe the tear from the eye, remove the agitation from the bosom; and calm the heart now swelling with grief; for he “healeth the broken in heart, and bindeth up their wounds.”

Charles H. Spurgeon- “Healing the Wounded” A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath Morning, November 11, 1855

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: