Home > Hermeneutics > By comparing together what is recorded in the earliest parts of John 12 and 13 some interesting and instructive contrasts are revealed

By comparing together what is recorded in the earliest parts of John 12 and 13 some interesting and instructive contrasts are revealed

By comparing together what is recorded in the earliest parts of John 12 and 13 some interesting and instructive contrasts are revealed. In the former we read that “they made Him a supper”; in the latter, there is a supper which He appointed. There He is seated at the table; here He arose from it. There He is honored; here He performs the office of a menial. In the one we behold Mary at the feet of the Savior; in the other we see the Son of God stooping to attend to the feet of His disciples. The feet speak of the walk. Christ’s feet were anointed with costly ointment; those of the apostles were washed with water. As Christ passed through this world He contracted no pollution: he left it as He entered—“holy, harmless, undefiled” (Hebrews 7:26). That His feet were anointed with the fragrant spikenard tells us of the sweet savor which ever ascended from Him to the Father, perfectly glorifying Him in every step of His path. In sharp contrast with His, the walk of the disciples was defiled, and the grime of the way needed to be removed if they were to have “part” or communion with Him (13:8). His feet were anointed before theirs were washed, for in all things He must have the “preeminence” (Colossians 1:18). In connection with the former Judas complained; in the latter, Peter demurred. Interpretatively the one had Christ’s burial in view (12:7); the other adumbrated an important part of His present ministry on high (13:1).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

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