Home > Hermeneutics > The first reference to “lamb” in scripture

The first reference to “lamb” in scripture

Most suggestive is the initial reference to the lamb. “And he said, Behold the fire and the wood: but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?” (Genesis 22:7, 8). How blessed and significant to observe, in the first place, that this conversation was between a loving father and an only begotten son (Hebrews 11:17). Second, how remarkable to learn that the lamb would not be demanded from man, but supplied by God. Third, still more noteworthy are the words “God will provide Himself a lamb,” because it was for the meeting of His requirements, the satisfying of His claims. Fourth, the lamb was not here designed for food (for that was not the prime thought), but “for a burnt offering.” Fifth, it was a substitute for the child of promise, for, as verse 13 exhibits, “the ram” (a male lamb in the prime of its strength) was not only provided by God, but was also offered by Abraham “in the stead of his son”! How significant it is to discover that the word worship is mentioned for the first time in connection with this scene: “I and the lad will go yonder and worship, and will come again to you” (v. 5). Worship calls for separation from unbelievers, as Abraham left his two young men behind him; it is possible only on resurrection ground (“the third day” 5:4); and it consists of offering unto God our bes —our Isaac.

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

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  1. October 23, 2018 at 1:27 pm

    Interesting as I do believe Genesis 22 has many typologies pointing us to Jesus

    • October 26, 2018 at 3:59 am

      Amen brother. Typology is ignored by many in the church today. Genesis lays the foundations for the rest of scripture.

      • October 26, 2018 at 11:19 am

        Amen

      • November 7, 2018 at 2:53 pm

        Amen indeed! Thanks for following brother.

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