Home > Comment > Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 219

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 219

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [The Church Officers, Metropolitan Tabernacle].

MENTONE, Jan. 12, ‘91.

MY BELOVED BRETHREN,—

Another death among us, and so soon! It is a loud voice to us all to stand ready.

I greatly wish I had been at home, for Mr. Carr was an old comrade and perhaps better known and valued by me than by anyone else, — since he served me in many private literary ways. He was true as steel to the old faith, and to me as an advocate of it. He was eccentric in manner, but in doctrine he kept to the form of sound words with great firmness. I am sure you will, in my absence, do all that the severe weather allows to make the family and the world see how we respect an ancient comrade, and a brother-officer. Some letter of sympathy would come well from you as a body of deacons and elders; but this you will have thought of apart from my suggestion.

Also pray for Mrs. Carr, with that large family, and so many of them young men and boys. What a charge for her! The Lord bless them!

Hearing of the continued badness of the weather, I accepted the advice telegraphed by deacons, and supported by letters from many valued friends, and I will remain here another week, — not idle, but storing powder and shot for the fight.

Brethren, you know I love you, and I know the same of you.

Yours in Christ Jesus,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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