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An initial reading plan of Andrew Fuller

February 15, 2016 Leave a comment

By Michael A.G. Haykin

I was recently asked by a brother who had purchased Andrew Fuller’s Works where and what to begin reading. I suggested first off, his circular letters, especially these:

1.Causes of Declension in Religion, and Means of Revival (1785)
2.Why Christians in the present Day possess less Joy than the Primitive Disciples (1795)
3.The Practical Uses of Christian Baptism (1802)
4.The Promise of the Spirit the grand Encouragement in promoting the Gospel (1810)

Then his Edwardsean work in which you see Fuller the theologian of love:

5.Memoirs of Rev. Samuel Pearce (1800)

His ordination sermons are also gems, especially:

6.The Qualifications and Encouragements of a Faithful Minister, illustrated by the Character and success of Barnabas
7.Spiritual Knowledge and Holy Love necessary for the Gospel Ministry
8.On an Intimate and Practical Acquaintance with the Word of God

Finally, the best of his apologetic works, his rebuttal of Sandemanianism:

9.Strictures on Sandemanianism (1810).

Tolle lege!

 

 
Source [Andrew Fuller Center]

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Reflections on the New Spurgeon Library

By Don Whitney

On October 20, 2015, I was honored to attend the dedication of the new C.H. Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. Midwestern is one of the six Southern Baptist Convention seminaries and one of America’s fifteen largest. I was privileged to teach there for ten years before I was invited to my present position at Southern Seminary in Louisville.

MBTS has enjoyed the evident blessing of God ever since the election of Dr. Jason Allen as president three years ago. The school has seen record enrollment, unprecedented financial support, and a remarkable transformation of the campus under President Allen’s leadership .

What will surely stand as one of the most enduring aspects of his legacy at Midwestern is the conception and construction of the Spurgeon Library.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

 

Some Thoughts on the Reading of Books

September 29, 2015 4 comments

by Albert R. Mohler

I cannot really remember when I did not love to read books. I do know that I was very eager to learn to read, and that I quickly found myself immersed in the world of books and literature. It may have been a seduction of sorts, and the Christian disciples must always be on guard to guide the eyes to books worthy of a disciple’s attention—and there are so many.

As Solomon warned, “Of making many books there is no end” (Ecc 12:12). There is no way to read everything, and not everything deserves to be read. I say that in order to confront the notion that anyone, anywhere, can master all that could be read with profit. I read a great deal, and a large portion of my waking hours are devoted to reading. Devotional reading for spiritual profit is an important part of the day, and that begins with the reading of Scripture. In terms of timing, I am somewhat unorthodox. My best time for spending time in the Word is late at night, when all is calm and quiet and I am mentally alert and awake. That is not the case when I first get up in the mornings, when I struggle to find each word on the page (or anything else, for that matter).

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

17th Century Baptist Literature is being published

February 17, 2014 4 comments

Are We Entering a Golden Age of 17th Century Baptist Literature?

Posted on February 11, 2014 by Steve Weaver

I certainly hope so. Having done my PhD in this largely unmined area of church history, I have a vested interest in making the inspiring stories and helpful theological musings of our 17th-century Baptist counterparts known. I’m committed to doing my part. In recent days, I have been encouraged by the number of solid publications about or containing the original works of 17th-century Baptists that have either been recently released or are slated to be released soon. In addition to the works listed below, I am currently revising my dissertation on Hercules Collins for publication and plan to separately publish Collins’ The Temple Repair’d in the near future.

Available Now:

Jonathan W. Arnold, The Reformed Theology of Benjamin Keach (1640-1704) (Regent’s Park College Publications, 2013).

Jonathan Arnold completed his dissertation on the most important seventeenth-century English Particular Baptist at Regent’s Park College of Oxford University. This work is a slightly revised version published in Regent’s Park College Publications excellent Centre for Baptist History and Heritage Studies series. As the title suggests, Arnold explores Keach as a Reformed theologian.

Clint C. Bass, Thomas Grantham (1633-1692) and General Baptist Theology (Regent’s Park College Publications, 2013).

At the same time that Arnold was working on his dissertation on Keach at Regent’s Park, Clint Bass was also working on his dissertation there on the most important seventeenth-century English General Baptist. This work is a slightly revised version published in Regent’s Park College Publications excellent Centre for Baptist History and Heritage Studies series. This work explores General Baptist theology through the prism of the life, ministry, and theological writings of Thomas Grantham.

John Inscore Essick, Thomas Grantham: God’s Messenger from Lincolnshire (Mercer University Press, 2013).

Another important work on Grantham was also released in 2013 by Mercer University Press. The publication of two major works on Grantham indicate something of his importance to understanding the General Baptists of the seventeenth century.

Larry J. Kreitzer, William Kiffen and his World (3 Volume Set) (Regent’s Park College Publications, 2010-2013).

Larry Kreitzer is a New Testament scholar who teaches at the OxfordUniversity’s Regent’s ParkCollege. On the side, he is a sleuth of seventeenth-century Baptist primary sources. His gift is masterfully mining archives for previously undiscovered primary source material on early English Baptists. I’ve seen his skill first hand as he showed me around the London Metropolitan Archives for material on Hercules Collins. His three-volume work on William Kiffen is a treasure trove of primary sources on this important seventeenth-century Baptist pastor (the only one to sign both the 1644 and 1689 London Confessions). I believe Kreitzer’s research will produce a fresh outburst of Kiffen scholarship.

J. Stephen Yuille, Looking unto Jesus: The Christ-Centered Piety of Seventeenth-Century Baptists (Pickwick Publications, 2013).

Stephen Yuille, an expert guide to Puritan spirituality, uncovers the Puritan-esqe spirituality of two seventeenth-century Particular Baptists–Thomas Wilcox and Vavasor Powell. This short work includes a sermon by Wilcox and a short treatise by Powell. Both demonstrate the Christ-centered piety of the Particular Baptists. Yuille includes two excellent essays of his own exploring the spirituality in the primary sources included.

Coming Soon:

Jason G. Duesing, Henry Jessey: Puritan Chaplain, Independent and Baptist Pastor, Millenarian Politician and Prophet (Borderstone Press, forthcoming).

Jason Duesing,Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Assistant Professor of Historical Theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, has revised his excellent dissertation on Henry Jessey for publication in Borderstone Press’ Thesis Imprint series. Jessey is an important figure in Baptist life. He was one of the first three pastors of the famous J-L-J independent congregation (Jacob-Lathrop-Jessey) from which early English Particular Baptist life sprung. He also became a Baptist himself!

Brian L. Hanson and Michael A.G. Haykin. Waiting on the Spirit of Promise: The Life and Theology of Suffering of Abraham Cheare (Pickwick Publications, forthcoming).

Brian Hanson and Michael Haykin present an introduction to the life and theology of Abraham Cheare, a seventeenth-century Particular Baptist pastor who suffered imprisonment for his gospel ministry. Along with their analysis of Cheare, four primary sources by Cheare are included in this work.

Michael A.G. Haykin and G. Stephen Weaver, Jr. An Orthodox Catechism (Reformed Baptist Academic Press, forthcoming).

Michael Haykin and I are publishing a revised, updated version of Hercules Collins’ 1680 An Orthodox Catechism, which is itself a Baptist revision of the 1563 Heidelberg Catechism. In addition to the text of the catechism, Haykin and I have authored a historical introduction to the catechism. This books should be available within a week or so.

 

Source: [Thoughts of a Pastor-Historian]

Free Kindle Book ‘The Gospel Focus of Charles Spurgeon’ (Through November)

November 11, 2013 4 comments

Through the month of November Reformation Trust is giving away a free download of “The Gospel Focus of Charles Spurgeon (Long Line of Godly Men Profiles)” written by Steven J. Lawson.

Charles Spurgeon, the great Baptist preacher of nineteenth-century London, is remembered today as the prince of preachers. However, the strength of Spurgeon s ministry went far beyond simple rhetorical skill. With a foundational commitment to the Bible, Spurgeon fearlessly taught the doctrines of grace and tirelessly held forth the free offer of salvation in Jesus Christ. In short, he was a firm believer in the truth of the gospel and the power of the gospel to save.

To download your Kindle copy of this book click here.

CHAPTER II-X-D

October 10, 2013 1 comment

THE TEN PRIMITIVE PERSECUTIONS

X-D. The Tenth Persecution, Under Diocletian, AD 303

Quirinus, bishop of Siscia, being carried before Matenius, the governor, was ordered to sacrifice to the pagan deities, agreeably to the edicts of various Roman emperors. The governor, perceiving his constancy, sent him to jail, and ordered him to be heavily ironed; flattering himself, that the hardships of a jail, some occasional tortures and the weight of chains, might overcome his resolution. Being decided in his principles, he was sent to Amantius, the principal governor of Pannonia, now Hungary, who loaded him with chains, and carried him through the principal towns of the Danube, exposing him to ridicule wherever he went. Arriving at length at Sabaria and finding that Quirinus would not renounce his faith, he ordered him to be cast into a river, with a stone fastened about his neck. This sentence being put into execution, Quirinus floated about for some time, and, exhorting the people in the most pious terms, concluded his admonitions with this prayer: “It is no new thing, O all-powerful Jesus, for Thee to stop the course of rivers, or to cause a man to walk upon the water, as Thou didst Thy servant Peter; the people have already seen the proof of Thy power in me; grant me now to lay down my life for Thy sake, O my God.” On pronouncing the last words he immediately sank, and died, June 4, AD 308. His body was afterwards taken up, and buried by some pious Christians.

Pamphilus, a native of Phoenicia, of a considerable family, was a man of such extensive learning that he was called a second Origen. He was received into the body of the clergy at Caesarea, where here he established a public library and spent his time in the practice of every Christian virtue. He copied the greatest part of the works of Origen with his own hand, and, assisted by Eusebius, gave a correct copy of the Old Testament, which had suffered greatly by the ignorance or negligence of former transcribers. In the year 307, he was apprehended, and suffered torture and martyrdom.

Marcellus, bishop of Rome, being banished on account of his faith, fell a martyr to the miseries he suffered in exile, January 16, AD 310.

Peter, the sixteenth bishop of Alexandria, was martyred November 25 AD 311, by order of Maximus Caesar, who reigned in the east.

Agnes, a virgin of only thirteen years of age, was beheaded for being a Christian; as was Serene, the empress of Diocletian. Valentine, a priest, suffered the same fate at Rome; and Erasmus, a bishop, was martyred in Campania.

Soon after this the persecution abated in the middle parts of the empire, as well as in the west; and Providence at length began to manifest vengeance on the persecutors. Maximian endeavored to corrupt his daughter Fausta to murder Constantine her husband; which she discovered, and Constantine forced him to choose her own death, when he preferred the ignominious death of hanging after being an emperor near twenty years.

Constantine was the good and virtuous child of a good and virtuous father, born in Britain. His mother was named Helena, daughter of King Coilus. He was a most bountiful and gracious prince, having a desire to nourish learning and good arts, and did oftentimes use to read, write, and study himself. He had marvelous good success and prosperous achieving of all things he took in hand, which then was (and truly) supposed to proceed of this, for that he was so great a favorer of the Christian faith. Which faith when he had once embraced, he did ever after most devoutly and religiously reverence.

Thus Constantine, sufficiently appointed with strength of men but especially with strength God, entered his journey coming toward Italy, which was about the last year of the persecution, A. D. 313. Maxentius, understanding of the coming of Constantine, and trusting more to his devilish art of magic than to the good will of his subjects, which he little deserved, durst not show himself out of the city, nor encounter him in the open field, but with privy garrisons laid wait for him by the way in sundry straits, as he should come; with whom Constantine had divers skirmishes, and by the power of the Lord did ever vanquish them and put them to flight.

Notwithstanding, Constantine yet was in no great comfort, but in great care and dread in his mind (approaching now near unto Rome) for the magical charms and sorceries of Maxentius, wherewith he had vanquished before Severus, sent by Galerius against him. Wherefore, being in great doubt and perplexity in himself and revolving many things in his mind, what help he might have against the operations of his charming, Constantine, in his journey drawing toward the city, and casting up his eyes many times to heaven, in the south part, about the going down of the sun, saw a great brightness in heaven, appearing in the similitude of a cross, giving this inscription, In hoc vince, that is, “In this overcome.” Eusebius Pamphilus doth witness that he had heard the said Constantine himself oftentimes report, and also to swear this to be true and certain, which he did see with his own eyes in heaven, and also his soldiers about him. At the sight whereof when he was greatly astonished, and consulting with his men upon the meaning thereof, behold, in the night season in his sleep, Christ appeared to him with the sign of the same cross which he had seen before, bidding him to make the figuration thereof, and to carry it in his wars before him, and so should he have the victory.

Constantine so established the peace of the Church that for the space of a thousand years we read of no set persecution against the Christians, unto the time of John Wickliffe.

So happy, so glorious was this victory of Constantine, surnamed named the Great! For the joy and gladness whereof, the citizens who had sent for him before, with exceeding triumph brought him into the city of Rome, where he was most honorably received, and celebrated the space of seven days together; having, moreover, in the market place, his image set up, holding in his right hand the sign of the cross, with this inscription: “With this wholesome sign, the true token of fortitude, I have rescued and delivered our city from the yoke of the tyrant.” We shall conclude our account of the tenth and last general persecution with the death of St. George, the titular saint and patron of England. St. George was born in Cappadocia, of Christian parents; and giving proofs of his courage, was promoted in the army of the emperor Diocletian. During the persecution, St. George threw up his command, went boldly to the senate house, and avowed his being Christian, taking occasion at the same time to remonstrate against paganism, and point out the absurdity of worshipping idols. This freedom so greatly provoked the senate that St. George was ordered to be tortured, and by the emperor’s orders was dragged through the streets, and beheaded the next day.

The legend of the dragon, which is associated with this martyr, is usually illustrated by representing St. George seated upon a charging horse and transfixing the monster with his spear. This fiery dragon symbolizes the devil, who was vanquished by St. George’s steadfast faith in Christ, which remained unshaken in spite of torture and death.

John Foxe-Foxe’s Book of Martyrs

CHAPTER II-X-C

THE TEN PRIMITIVE PERSECUTIONS

X-C. The Tenth Persecution, Under Diocletian, AD 303

Victorius, Carpophorus, Severus, and Severianus, were brothers, and all four employed in places of great trust and honor in the city of Rome. Having exclaimed against the worship of idols, they were apprehended, and scourged, with the plumbetÊ, or scourges, to the ends of which were fastened leaden balls. This punishment was exercised with such excess of cruelty that the pious brothers fell martyrs to its severity.

Timothy, a deacon of Mauritania, and Maura his wife, had been united together by the bands of wedlock above three weeks, when they were separated from each other by the persecution.

Timothy, being apprehended as a Christian, was carried before Arrianus, the governor of Thebais, who, knowing that he had the keeping of the Holy Scriptures, commanded him to deliver them up to be burnt; to which he answered, “Had I children, I would sooner deliver them up to be sacrificed, than part with the Word of God,” The governor being much incensed at this reply, ordered his eyes to be put out, with red-hot irons, saying “The books shall at least be useless to you, for you shall not see to read them.” His patience under the operation was so great that the governor grew more exasperated; he, therefore, in order, if possible, to overcome his fortitude, ordered him to be hung up by the feet, with a weight tied about his neck, and a gag in his mouth. In this state, Maura his wife, tenderly urged him for her sake to recant; but, when the gag was taken out of his mouth, instead of consenting to his wife’s entreaties, he greatly blamed her mistaken love, and declared his resolution of dying for the faith. The consequence was, that Maura resolved to imitate his courage and fidelity and either to accompany or follow him to glory. The governor, after trying in vain to alter her resolution, ordered her to be tortured, which was executed with great severity. After this, Timothy and Maura were crucified near each other, AD 304.

Sabinus, bishop of Assisium, refusing to sacrifice to Jupiter, and pushing the idol from him, had his hand cut off by the order of the governor of Tuscany. While in prison, he converted the governor and his family, all of whom suffered martyrdom for the faith. Soon after their execution, Sabinus himself was scourged to death, December, AD 304.

Tired with the farce of state and public business, the emperor Diocletian resigned the imperial diadem, and was succeeded by Constantius and Galerius; the former a prince of the most mild and humane disposition and the latter equally remarkable for his cruelty and tyranny. These divided the empire into two equal governments, Galerius ruling in the east, and Constantius in the west; and the people in the two governments felt the effects of the dispositions of the two emperors; for those in the west were governed in the mild manner, but such as resided in the east felt all the miseries of oppression and lengthened tortures.

Among the many martyred by the order of Galerius, we shall enumerate the most eminent.

Amphianus was a gentleman of eminence in Lucia, and a scholar of Eusebius; Julitta, a Lycaonian of royal descent, but more celebrated for her virtues than noble blood. While on the rack, her child was killed before her face.

Julitta, of Cappadocia, was a lady of distinguished capacity, great virtue, and uncommon courage.

To complete the execution, Julitta had boiling pitch poured on her feet, her sides torn with hooks, and received the conclusion of her martyrdom, by being beheaded, April 16, AD 305.

Hermolaus, a venerable and pious Christian, of a great age, and an intimate acquaintance of Panteleon’s, suffered martyrdom for the faith on the same day, and in the same manner as Panteleon.

Eustratius, secretary to the governor of Armina, was thrown into a fiery furnace for exhorting some Christians who had been apprehended, to persevere in their faith.

Nicander and Marcian, two eminent Roman military officers, were apprehended on account of their faith. As they were both men of great abilities in their profession, the utmost means were used to induce them to renounce Christianity, but these endeavors being found ineffectual, they were beheaded.

In the kingdom of Naples, several martyrdoms took place, in particular, Januaries, bishop of Bemeventum; Sosius, deacon of Misene; Proculus, another deacon; Eutyches and Acutius, two laymen; Festus, a deacon; and Desiderius, a reader, all, on account of being Christians, were condemned by the governor of Campania to be devoured by the wild beasts. The savage animals, however, would not touch them, and so they were beheaded.

John Foxe-Foxe’s Book of Martyrs