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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 218

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [Mrs. Bartlett’s Class].

MENTONE, Saturday evening. [Undated.]

BELOVED FRIENDS, —

I write to salute you all, and especially your beloved mother in the gospel, my dear friend, Mrs. Bartlett. I hope you are enjoying times of power such as have been so usual with the class. The Lord’s own daughters among you— each one a princess, not in her own right, but by marriage to King Jesus,— are, I trust, living in the enjoyment of their high privileges.

Why should the children of a King

Go mourning all their days?”

Yours it is to wear a girdle of joy; “For the joy of the Lord is your strength.” See to it that your lives are consistent with your high callings, for it ill becomes the daughters of Zion to demean themselves like the children of earth. “Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ.” Be watchful for the souls of others, and support by your prayers the earnest efforts of your beloved leader, Mrs. Bartlett.

For those of you who are unsaved, I have this word, — “How long halt ye between two opinions?” Years roll on; and each one spent in alienation from God swells your dreadful account. Have you not sinned enough? Have you not run risks enough, that you must still imperil your souls? An hour even of the toothache is too much; but what is that compared with the disease of sin and the anger of God? Yet these you bear as if they were mere trifles. Will the time of decision never come? Or will you linger till you perish in your sin? “Remember Lot’s wife.” She is a monument of salt; take a little of that salt, and season your thoughts with it. Your graves are yawning for you, hell also enlargeth itself. Flee from the wrath to come; start up, like those who have been asleep upon the brink of death; and “strive to enter in at the strait gate.”

Yours lovingly, for Christ’s sake,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 217

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Mr. John Seivwright].

MENTONE, Dec. 27, 1891.

DEAR SIR,-Shut in by rain on Sabbath, I receive your fraternal note. I thank you much. The Lord be with you and all His saints in Aberdeen. I progress slowly, but I think surely. In me let His will be done, and that shall be joy to me, be it what it may.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 216

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Rev. Arthur Tappan Pierson, D.D.].

[MENTONE] 1891.

DEAR DR. PIERSON, —

The Lord’s name be praised that ever I knew you. He planned to set me aside and at the same time He made you ready to fill the vacancy. Every word about you makes me praise God for sending you. I feel that I can rest in you as one sent by my faithful Lord to do faithfully His work. May you never have to regret anything in connection with your remarkable deed of brotherly love….

Moses may be weak but Aaron and Hur are strong in the Lord. I am mending as to flesh but quite restored in spirit. Before long I hope to be on the watch tower again and gratefully surveying the fort which you have held to the satisfaction of all the garrison….

I trust that Mrs. Pierson is not unhappy in the city of Gog, Magog and Fog. I cannot wonder, but I do ponder over, the great unselfish love that keeps you grinding in the fog that I may rest in the sun. God bless you and make it up to you.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 215

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Mr. F. J. Feltham].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Dec. 5.

DEAR SIR, —

I tender you my Christian love in return for this good thoughtful deed of yours, which may my Lord repay.

I have been too pressed to write before; but you have cheered me and made me pray, “God bless him!” £20 safely received.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 214

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Canon Palmer].

[Undated.]

DEAR SIR, —

I am exceedingly obliged by your prompt and Christian reply. I felt it needful to make my protest against the bell-ringing somewhat strong, that I might not appear to be asking a favor merely, but claiming a right not to be disturbed. Otherwise, the lapse of years gives right to a custom against which no protest is entered. This, and no unfriendliness to you, prompted what you considered to be a threat. I can only hope that future correspondence may be, on my part, on a more pleasant subject, and, on your part, may be in the same generous tone.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 216

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Canon Palmer].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, July 4.

DEAR SIR, —

I beg to call your attention to the great disturbance caused by the ringing of a bell, at St. Gabriel’s Church, while the congregation at the Tabernacle is engaged in prayer. I reminded your predecessor that no right of bellringing belongs to any but a parish church, and informed him that I really must appeal to the law to stop the needless nuisance. He very kindly reduced the evil to the minimum, and I no longer objected. I am sure it is far from me to wish to interfere with the peculiar habits of my neighbors; but when many hundreds of persons, met to worship God, are disturbed by the clanging of a loud bell, it compels me to complain. The hours when we are at worship are at 11 and 6.30 on Sunday, and from 7 to 8.30 p.m. On Monday and Thursday.

Wishing to be upon good terms with all in the parish, I trust that you will not allow the bell-ringer to disturb us further, but will substitute a few strokes for the many which are now given.

I am,

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Introducing the ‘Baptist Library Vol I

Reformedontheweb is excited to present to you: “The Baptist Library Vol I.” Each book is in adobe reader format, and is a searchable document. I only have one scanned file in this entire collection. My goal is to produce a library that is Baptist friendly and that focuses primarily on particular Baptist doctrine. This does not mean that all the files on this Cd are by particular Baptists. Some are by paedobaptist and are included because they present Biblical truth that particular Baptist agree with; such as: Boettner’s ‘The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination.’ This is what the collection includes:

A workable index– search the entire library through one master index. Each collection has its own index, however, send a shortcut of the master index to your desktop and access all files through the master index. The master index is titled ‘baptistvol1.index’

Over 400 Mb’s of books on this disk

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‘Abraham Booth- The Reign of Grace’

‘Benjamin Keach- The Glory of a True Church and its Discipline Display’d’

‘Isaac Backus- The Bondwoman and the Free’

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