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Expository Preaching—The Antidote to Anemic Worship

by Albert Mohler

Evangelical Christians have been especially attentive to worship in recent years, sparking a renaissance of thought and conversation on what worship really is and how it should be done. Even if this renewed interest has unfortunately resulted in what some have called the “worship wars” in some churches, it seems that what A. W. Tozer once called the “missing jewel” of evangelical worship is being recovered.

Nevertheless, if most evangelicals would quickly agree that worship is central to the life of the church, there would be no consensus to an unavoidable question: What is central to Christian worship? Historically, the more liturgical churches have argued that the sacraments form the heart of Christian worship. These churches….

 

 

 

 

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An April Fool or any Day of the Year Fool

An April Fool or any day of the year Fool, is one who denies God’s existence.

<To the chief Musician upon Mahalath, Maschil, A Psalm of David.>

Psa 53:1 The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. Corrupt are they, and have done abominable iniquity: there is none that doeth good.

Psa 53:2 God looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand, that did seek God.

Psa 53:3 Every one of them is gone back: they are altogether become filthy; there is none that doeth good, no, not one.

Psa 53:4 Have the workers of iniquity no knowledge? who eat up my people as they eat bread: they have not called upon God.

Is the Existence of the NT Canon Incompatible with Claims of New Revelation?

January 12, 2016 1 comment

By Michael Kruger

“God has spoken to me.”

There are few statements that will shut down debate more quickly than this one. If Christians disagree over a doctrine, a practice, or an idea, then the trump card is always “God has spoken to me” about that. End of discussion.

But, the history of the church (not to mention the Scriptures themselves) demonstrates that such claims of private, direct revelation are highly problematic. Of course, this doesn’t mean that God doesn’t speak to people. The Scripture is packed with examples of this. But, these were typically individuals with a unique calling (e.g., prophet or apostle), or who functioned at unique times in redemptive history (e.g., the early church in Acts).

After the first century was over, and the apostles had died, the church largely rejected the idea that any ol’ person could step forward and claim to have direct revelation from God. This reality is probably best exemplified in the early Christian debate over Montanism.

Montanism was a second-century movement whose leader Montanus claimed to receive direct revelation from God. In addition, two of his “prophetesses,” Priscilla and Maximilla also claimed to receive such revelation. Such revelations were often accompanied by strange behavior. When Montanus had these revelations, “[He] became obsessed, and suddenly fell into frenzy and convulsions. He began to be ecstatic and to speak and to talk strangely” (Hist. Eccl. 5.16.7).

 

 

 

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A Reformed Baptist View of I Cor. 7:14

December 10, 2015 Leave a comment

by Stan Reeves

For the unbelieving husband is sanctified through his wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified through her believing husband; for otherwise your children are unclean, but now they are holy. I Cor. 7:14

 

 
Introduction

The implications of I Cor. 7:14 for the issue of infant baptism have often been debated by baptists and paedobaptists. Regrettably, both sides have been guilty of handling this passage in a simplistic manner. The paedobaptist errors are particularly disturbing, since most paedobaptists appeal to this passage to help establish their case for infant baptism. To read some of their claims, one would think that the passage implies infant baptism in a most obvious way. A closer examination, however, reveals that this passage offers no support for infant baptism; in fact, we will see that the passage actually argues against infant baptism.

A Critique of the Paedobaptist Interpretation

The paedobaptist argument from I Cor. 7:14 is expressed well by John Murray:

The apostle was writing to encourage them against this fear [that their Christian standing would be prejudiced by this mixed relationship]. The encouragement he provides is that the unbelieving husband is sanctified in the wife and the unbelieving wife is sanctified in the brother. In order to reinforce the argument drawn from this principle he appeals to what had been apparently recognised among the Corinthians, namely, that the children of even one believing parent were not unclean but rather holy. (Christian Baptism, p. 64)

 

 

 

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A Quiz on the Doctrine of Scripture

November 11, 2015 3 comments

by Tim Challies

God has spoken and God speaks. God has spoken and continues to speak through the Holy Scriptures, the Bible. How well do you know the doctrine of the Scripture? How well do you know what the Bible tells us about the Bible? This short thirty-three question quiz is designed to help you find out.

 

 

 

To take the quiz click here.

Categories: Scripture Tags: , , ,

What is the Earliest Complete List of the Canon of the New Testament?

by Michael J. Kruger

In the study of the New Testament canon, scholars like to highlight the first time we see a complete list of 27 books. Inevitably, the list contained in Athanasius’ famous Festal Letter (c.367) is mentioned as the first time this happened.

As a result, it is often claimed that the New Testament was a late phenomenon. We didn’t have a New Testament, according to Athanasius, until the end of the fourth century.

But, this sort of reasoning is problematic on a number of levels. First, we don’t measure the existence of the New Testament just by the existence of lists. When we examine the way certain books were used by the early church fathers, it is evident that there was a functioning canon long before the fourth century. Indeed, by the second century, there is already a “core” collection of New Testament books functioning as Scripture.

 

 

 

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Sufficiency of the Scriptures – the New Battle for the Bible

I still remember, as a teen, listening to a sermon about the Gerasene demoniac from Mark 5. It’s an amazing story detailing Christ’s power over the spiritual forces of darkness and ability to deliver men from their devilish grip. But you would have never known that from the sermon I was hearing. My childhood pastor, a graduate of a SBC seminary, argued away any supernatural element and declared this event was nothing more than Jesus attacking the social injustice of his day.

According to my pastor, Jesus wasn’t interacting with an actual demon who possessed this man, as the text so clearly states, but simply a man who had been driven to insanity after being robbed of all self-dignity in his society. This poor man no longer saw himself as a valuable individual. Therefore, when Jesus asked for his name, he simply answered, “My name is Legion: for we are many.” Translated: “I am just a nobody numbered among the masses of society.” Who had brought this unjust plight upon this man? Simply put, it was the corporate pig farmers who had used men like him to line their pockets with profit. Therefore, Jesus destroyed the source of their profit by driving their commodity into the sea and bringing His judgment upon those capitalistic pigs.

 

 

 

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