Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 112

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Aug. 5, ‘79.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I am most grateful for your offer of a house and I see no sort ‘of reason why you should not nominate as you wish — with the proviso that they meet our rules as to being destitute, healthy, and between 6 and 10, besides being legitimate and not deformed.

What a kind friend you are! I pray the Lord reward you for all this according to His grace.

I have seen Mr. Page and had a long interview; you will soon receive draft.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

The Wednesday Word: The Unlikely Gospel!

I am so thankful for the ministry of the Holy Spirit in relation to the Gospel. He gives us faith (Ephesians 2:8) and then persuades us of impossible things, the most unlikely of these being the Gospel itself!

Have you ever considered the unlikeliness of the whole Gospel story? Here we are on a tiny, insignificant speck of a planet, un-noticeable in the vast array of galaxies and yet God, the Creator of all things, has a particular interest in us.

And the skeptic says, “What a far-fetched idea!”

Well, it may be far-fetched to some, but the truth is He came here and became one of us!

And the doubter says, “Wait a minute, I don’t believe in fairy stories!”

But this is no fairy story; not only did He become one of us, but He also died the cruelest of deaths for us as He took responsibility for our sins and failures. And not only did He die for us, but He also became a curse for us and at the cross became the greatest reject in the universe.

And the cynic says, “That’s impossible.”

Impossible to believe? Yes indeed, the whole thing is impossible to believe unless the Holy Spirit possesses us and, in grace, opens our spiritual eyes. It’s all impossible to grasp unless He gives us faith to believe. He lets us see that the baby born in the stable was the Mighty God (Isaiah 9:6). He births faith that we might see that our redemption and security are in the Lamb of God alone (John 1:29). He convinces us that our righteousness is in Christ alone (Jeremiah 23:6). He shows us that, because of the blood, our conscience can be at peace (Hebrews 9:14). He guarantees us that we are fully accepted in heaven, right now and forever, because of Jesus (Ephesians 1:6). He assures us that our adversary, Satan, has been judged and defeated at the cross (Colossians 2:15). He persuades us that there is a fierce judgment to come and yet witnesses to us that as His blood washed people, we have nothing to fear (Romans 3:25).

The Holy Spirit continually takes us to the Lord Jesus whom we have never seen and does the impossible by making Him exceedingly precious to our hearts. He magnifies the Lord Jesus and causes our desires to go after Him. We could see nothing in Christ Jesus to desire were it not for the ministry of the Spirit. The great English preacher, William Romaine said it this way;

“This is the way in which the Holy Ghost glorifies Jesus: He gives the believer such views of the infinite fullness and everlasting sufficiency of Emmanuel, that he is quite satisfied with Him. William Romaine: Letter 11 (Dec. 29th, 1764).

Without the ministry of the Holy Spirit, the whole Gospel record and its ensuing mercies are impossible to grasp. It is far-fetched. It is foolishness (1 Corinthians 1:18). Someone says, “I see what you mean, when I think about it I find it’s almost impossible to believe that one simple act of faith on my part can wipe out the entire record of sin and the accumulated filth of a lifetime of wickedness.”

Well no, that’s not what I mean. You talk about the impossibility of faith wiping out your sin—– well I agree with you. No amount of believing on your part can erase the horror and depth of your sin—that is indeed impossible! But, here’s the reality; Jesus Christ has already purged our sin. He has already redeemed (paid for) us. Because of Him, we are out of spiritual debt; we are free and clear. Our believing does not purge our sins; our believing does not redeem us. Our believing doesn’t pay our debt to God. And it doesn’t have to because Christ has already finished and accomplished our redemption at Calvary. The Holy Spirit gives faith to believe this—He gives faith to rest on this. Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ. Rest on Him and the impossible will become a reality—you will be saved!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

Duty of Living and Walking in the Holy Spirit: The Divinity of the Holy Spirit- Book Sixth- Chapter 2

Book Sixth

CHAPTER II.

THE DIVINITY OF THE HOLY SPIRIT.

THE HOLY SPIRIT IS GOD.[1]

When we have ascertained that there is a person to whom the name Holy Spirit is applied, we can have little difficulty in arriving at the conclusion that he is a divine person. The following arguments establish this truth.

1. In the commission he is equally included with the Father and the Son, in the name into which we are baptised. If he is not God when we devote ourselves to him in our baptism, we are guilty of idolatry. It is no objection to this argument, that Paul says the Israelites were baptised unto Moses.[2] A formal baptism in the name of Moses is neither affirmed nor intended. An analogy is exhibited between the course of a believer who dedicates himself to Christ in baptism, and the course of the Israelites, who gave themselves up to the guidance of Moses, from the Red Sea to the promised land: but an analogy only is all that is intended. The Corinthians were not baptised in the name of Paul;[3] though it was their duty to follow him as he followed Christ: and the Israelites were not baptised in the name of Moses; though they followed him as their leader. The Angel, in whom the name of God was, went before them, in the pillar of cloud and fire; and Moses, equally with all the rest, followed his guidance, and acknowledged his authority.

2. In the benediction, the Spirit is named, equally with the Father and the Son, and regarded as the source of spiritual blessings. The words may be considered a prayer to the Holy Spirit, for the bestowment of these blessings.

3. When the bodies of believers are called the temple of the Holy Ghost,[4] the deity of the Holy Ghost is recognised. They to whom temples of wood or stone were erected, were regarded as deities: and he to whom the bodies of the saints are temples, must be God. But we are not left to our own inference on this subject. Paul has drawn the conclusion for us: for after having stated that the bodies of the saints are the temples of the Holy Ghost, he speaks of them as belonging to God;[5] and in another place, when speaking of the saints as a temple, he calls the building a “habitation of God through the Spirit.”[6] The same view is presented in 1 Cor. iii. 16: “Know ye not, that ye are the temple of God, and that the spirit of God dwelleth in you? If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy: for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.” So the heathen deities were imagined to dwell in the temples dedicated to them; and so God was in his holy temple at Jerusalem.

4. The heinousness of the sin against the Holy Ghost, is proof of his divinity. When Ananias and Sapphira lied to the Holy Ghost, Peter explained the enormity of their sin in these words: “Thou hast not lied to men, but to God.”[7] To sin against the Holy Ghost, is to sin, not against a creature, but against God. This argument acquires greatly increased force, when we consider the words of Christ: “All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men; but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.[8] Whatever be the reason that renders blasphemy against the Holy Ghost unpardonable, it must include in it that he is God. If he is not God, sin committed against him would be less heinous than that committed against the Father and the Son.

5. Passages of the Old Testament which speak of Jehovah, the Supreme God, are, in the New Testament, applied to the Holy Ghost.[9]

6. The attributes of God are applied, in Scripture, to the Holy Spirit.

Eternity. “Who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God.”[10]

Omnipresence. “Whither shall I go from thy Spirit? and whither shall I flee from thy presence?”[11]

Omniscience. “The Spirit searcheth all things; yea, the deep things of God.”[12]

7. Divine works are ascribed to the Holy Spirit.

Creation. “The Spirit of God moved on the face of the waters.”[13] “By his Spirit he garnished the heavens.[14]

Providence. “Thou sendest forth thy Spirit, they are created; and thou renewest the face of the earth.”[15]

Miracles. “If I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you.”[16] “To another is given the working of miracles by the same Spirit.”[17]

Resurrection of Christ. “Declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.”[18] “Being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit.”[19]

Resurrection of believers. “If the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you.”[20]

[1] Matt. xxviii. 19; Heb. ix. 14; Ps. cxxxix. 7; 1 Cor. vi. 19; 2 Cor. vi. 16; Acts v. 3, 4.

[2] 1 Cor. x. 2.

[3] 1 Cor. i. 13.

[4] 1 Cor. vi. 19.

[5] 1 Cor. vi. 20.

[6] Eph. ii. 22.

[7] Acts v. 3, 4.

[8] Matt. xii. 31.

[9] Ex. xvii. 7 compared with Heb. iii. 9; Isaiah vi. 8, with Acts xxviii. 25; Jer. xxxi. 31-34, with Heb. x. 15-17.

[10] Heb. ix. 14.

[11] Ps. cxxxix. 7.

[12] 1 Cor. ii. 10.

[13] Gen. i. 2.

[14] Job xxvi. 13.

[15] Ps. civ. 30.

[16] Matt. xii. 28.

[17] 1 Cor. xii. 10.

[18] Rom. i. 4.

[19] 1 Pet. iii. 18.

[20] Rom. viii. 11.

John L. Dagg- Manual of Theology

Concerning this blog

April 11, 2017 2 comments

I appreciate everyone who follows this blog. As you all know my hours were cut last October and therefore that has forced me to make a change in my vocation, in order to take care of my family. Starting two weeks from now all that will appear on this blog will be nothing but quotes from church leaders of the past. It will take me several months to get on my feet in my new profession.

So again, I appreciate those who follow and read this blog. Be patient with me as I adjust to my new means of making a living.

God bless,

Hershel

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Fuller and the Atonement (Part 3): Until You Have Paid the Last Penney

Tom Nettles

Editorial note: This is the sixth post in a series on Andrew Fuller’s theology. Here is the series so far: Fuller the Non-Calvinist? (Part 1), Fullerite: Doctrine of Inability (Part 2), Fuller and Irresistible Grace (Part 3), Fuller and the Atonement – 1/4 (Part 4), Fuller and the Atonement – 2/4 (Part 5), Fuller and the Atonement – 3/4 (Part 6), and Fuller and the Atonement 4/4 (Part 7).

Though Andrew Fuller asserted that Calvinists in general held the covenantal application view of particular redemption, historically that which he called the “commercial” view has co-existed with it. That view, defended among the Baptists by John Spilsbury [1] (as far as we can discern the first Particular Baptist pastor), Abraham Booth [2], and John L. Dagg [3], contends that the suffering of Christ is a matter of actual measurable justice. The propitiatory wrath set forth by the Father must be commensurate with the degree of susceptibility to punishment for all those that the Father gave to the Son. For them in particular Jesus sanctified himself….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Distinguish between things that differ: Example 1

20. Distinguish between things that differ, for if we do not the Bible will at once appear to contradict itself, and our minds will be in a state of hopeless confusion. If we carelessly generalize and confound things apart, not only shall we form a vague conception of them, but in many instances a thoroughly erroneous one. Most necessary is it that the expositor attend diligently to this rule: only so will he be able to give the true explanation of many a verse. Not only is it important to discriminate between two diverse things, but often to draw distinctions between various aspects of the same subject. Take, first, the word “care.” In Luke 10:41, we find our Lord rebuking Martha because she was “careful and troubled about many things,” and His servant wrote, “I would have you without carefulness” (1 Corinthians 7:32); while in Philippians 4:6, Christians are exhorted to “be careful for nothing.” On the other hand, we are exhorted that there should be no division in the local church,

“but that the members should have the same care one for another” (1 Corinthians 12:25),

and the apostle commended penitent saints for the “carefulness” it wrought in them and expressed his own concern for their welfare by referring to “our care” for them (2 Corinthians 7:11, 12). Thus there is a “care” which is forbidden and a care that is required. The one is a godly and moderate solicitude, which moves to watchfulness and the taking of pains in the performing of duty; the other is a destructive and inordinate one that produces distraction and worry.

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Charles Haddon Spurgeon

April 10, 2017 2 comments

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92) was England’s best-known preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1854, just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 20, became pastor of London’s famed New Park Street Church (formerly pastored by the famous Baptist theologian John Gill). The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000—all in the days before electronic amplification. In 1861 the congregation moved permanently to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle.

“Mr. Spurgeon’s magnum opus, The TREASURY OF DAVID, which occupied over twenty years of the author’s busy life, is too well known to need any lengthy description. The comments and expositions abound in rich, racy, and suggestive remarks, and they have a strong flavour of the homiletic and practical exposition with which Mr. Spurgeon is accustomed to accompany his public reading of Holy Scripture. There is an intensity of belief, a fulness of assent to the great points of Calvinistic orthodoxy which our author would not be true to himself if he attempted to conceal. The brief introductions are very well done, and the abundant apparatus criticus, the list of hundreds of writers on the Psalms, whose meditations have been laid under contribution to enrich the work, render this commentary one of the most voluminous in existence. At all events, the volumes will be an encyclopaedia of reference.” — [British Quarterly Review]

“We are convinced that Mr. Spurgeon is doing an inestimable service to the Church in compiling this work. The years will come when as a preacher he will be a tradition, and grandfathers will describe to their son’s children the visits they paid to the Metropolitan Tabernacle, the style and character of the sermon, the impression produced by the man and the crowd of hearers, and the story will lose none of its interest in the telling; but such fame slowly, steadily diminishes, and surely fades into the faintest possible outlines. It will be impossible for future generations to estimate the influence which Mr. Spurgeon, as a man of speech and action, exerted in his own day; nor will the innumerable volumes of sermons which have been issued, and still continue to appear, present any fair means by which a critical judgment of his mental vigour can be obtained. Mr. Spurgeon, like every great man, is so much more than his works; but we believe that this “Treasury of David” will do more to win the admiration of future generations, and to sustain its author’s reputation than any other of the multiplied works to which he has set his hand. It will live. There is nothing like it in the English language, and it supplies a desideratum which most ministers have felt. We trust that Mr. Spurgeon will be spared in fulness of strength to complete what must be regarded by all thoughtful judges as his magnum opus.” — [The English Independent]

 

Source [Reformed Reader]