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Posts Tagged ‘Adultery’

Briefer statements are to be interpreted by fuller ones-Example 2: Putting away spouse for adultery

January 19, 2016 2 comments

Arthur PinkMuch harm has been done by some who, without qualification, pressed our Lord’s words in Mark 10:11,

“Whosoever shall put away his wife, and marry another, committeth adultery against her,”

thereby subjecting the innocent party to the same penalty as the guilty one. But that statement is to be interpreted in the light of the fuller one in Matthew 5:32,

“Whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced [for any other cause] committeth adultery”

— repeated by Christ in Matthew 19:9. In those words the sole Legislator for His people propounded a general rule: “Whosoever putteth away his wife causeth her to commit adultery,” and then He put in an exception. namely that where adultery has taken place he may put away, and he may marry again. As Christ there teaches the lawfulness of divorce on the ground of marital infidelity, so He teaches that it is lawful for the innocent one to marry again after such a divorce, without contracting guilt. The violation of the marriage vows severs the marriage bond, and the one who kept them is, after divorce is obtained, free to marry again.

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Mark Driscoll, Tullian Tchividjian, and Reformed Baptist Polity

September 22, 2015 Leave a comment

by Tom Chantry

It has been roughly a year since the evangelical and small-c calvinist worlds were embroiled in the ongoing collapse of Mars Hill Church and the once booming ministry of Mark Driscoll. A cascade of revelations, from plagiarized material to authoritarian abuses to dishonest financial practices all resulted in the collapse of Driscoll’s reputation and, ultimately, the loss of his ministry.

In the midst of this disaster Evangelical Fix-it Man Paul Tripp™ was flown in to become part of something called the Board of Advisors and Accountability, which was patterned after the apostolic institution of the…uh…never mind. As the disaster broadened, even Paul Tripp™ bailed out, stating on his way out the door, “This is without a doubt the most abusive, coercive ministry culture I’ve ever been involved with.”

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The Moral Law A Rule of Obedience

September 8, 2015 Leave a comment

by Samuel Bolton

QUERY I: Are Christians freed from the moral law as a rule of obedience?

Our text (John 8.36) is the main basis whereon this doctrine of Christian freedom is built. But many have endeavoured to build their own superstructures, hay and stubble, upon it, which the foundation will never bear. Indeed, there are so many opinions which plead patronage from this doctrine that I conceive it is my great work to vindicate so excellent a doctrine as this is-true Christian freedom – from those false, and I may say licentious, doctrines which are fastened and fathered upon it. I must show you that neither this doctrine, nor yet this text, will afford countenance to, or contribute any strength to the positions and opinions which some would seem to deduce from it and build upon it.

The work is great, for I am to deal with the greatest knots in the practical part of divinity, and men’s judgments are various. Scripture is pleaded on all hands. The more difficult the work, the more need of your prayers, that the Father of lights would go before us, and by His own light lead and guide us into the ways of all truth. In this confidence we shall venture to launch into these deeps, and begin the examination and trial of those doctrines which are deduced from, and would seem to be built upon, this text. The first doctrine, and the main one, that they would seem to build upon this text is, that believers are freed from the law. And this shall be the first question we will examine.

In answer to this query as it is propounded, we must confess that we are not without some places of Scripture which declare the law to be abrogated, nor without some again that speak of it as yet in force. We will give you a taste of some of them; and shall begin with those that seem to speak of the abrogation of the law.

 

 

 
Read the entire article here.

I Blame Us, Part 5: The Recovery

September 8, 2015 Leave a comment

Let’s Have a Reformation!

All week I have argued that the American Evangelical church is to blame for the collapse of our culture. We have failed utterly to maintain the doctrine of the law which was universally taught in Protestant confessions, becoming instead a lawless people. This has handicapped our witness to the world, robbing us of the moral authority to speak and of any message which could convict.

A very serious reformation is needed. Efforts to defund (and dismantle) Planned Parenthood are certainly a righteous cause. It is right for Christians to fight abortion, and to struggle to define marriage properly. However, a more fundamental reformation is necessary, and what is more, it is within the grasp of the church. I speak of a reformation of Evangelicalism – one in which we repent of the last half-century of abandonment of morality. The needed reformation will be spiritual, theological, ecclesiastical, and homiletical.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

I Blame Us, Part 4: The Failure

September 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Yesterday I wrote about the scourge of antinomianism which has all but erased traditional protestant doctrine from the evangelical world. While thorough antinomians may be in a minority; they are both vocal and influential. Most evangelicals have at least abandoned part of the law. Many have adopted a form of homiletical antinomianism – an antinomianism of message if you will. It is as though we are permitted to believe in moral law, so long as we never preach it and rarely write about it. Where the law is still permitted to be discussed, it is only with regard to its first (evangelistic) use. Talk of the law restraining human corruption is forgotten, while talk of the law as a standard for Christian ethics is strongly resisted within the church.

But what does any of this have to do with the moral collapse in culture? After all, a solid majority even of self-professed evangelicals still oppose gay marriage, and we are nearly unanimous in our opposition to the culture of death characterized by Planned Parenthood. Are we indeed to blame?

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

I Blame Us, Part 3: The Rejection

Anybody for a game of “Who’s the Pharisee”?

Yesterday I laid out the traditional Christian ethical system, having already quoted the chapter on the law from the 1689 Baptist Confession. Of course this system seems like a radical departure to any contemporary Christian who has been raised on the conviction that biblical law is a useless relic from an earlier dispensation. It is, however, the consistent teaching of Protestantism. In a nutshell, that system may be summarized like this:

1.All biblical law is derived from the character of God, and is thus by definition good.

2.Some laws served a temporary purpose, and God himself abrogated those laws.

3.Biblical law also includes that which is permanent and universal, and this is clearly identified in the Ten Commandments.

4.No one keeps this law perfectly, and thus no one is saved by keeping it.

5.The moral law is nevertheless very useful, and therefore ought to be preached.

6.The preaching and teaching of the moral law is entirely consistent with the gospel.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

I Blame Us, Part 2: The Law

Yesterday I argued that the main culprit in America’s moral collapse has been none other than Evangelical Christianity. In support of that argument I linked to the 1689 Confession’s statement on the law. I argued that this was not a uniquely Particular Baptist doctrine, nor even English Reformed, but was universal in the Protestant church at one time. So before I make some observations on the confession, I need to demonstrate the truth of this statement: “[This] theology was held by Anglicans, Presbyterians, Lutherans, and the Continental Reformed as well as the Baptists.”

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.