Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Almighty God’

The Wednesday Word: Was Jesus ever called God?

We, followers of Christ need to be grounded in the truth that the One we are following is the eternal God. Contrary to some popular ideas, Jesus is indeed called God in numerous places of scripture: Take for example,

The Word was God, John 1:1.

Thomas called Jesus Lord and God, John 20.28.

We learn that God was manifest in the flesh, I Timothy 3:16.

And let’s not forget Romans 9:5, “Of whom, as concerning the flesh, Christ came who is over all God blessed forever.”

Away with these mischief makers who say that Jesus is not man and God at the same time. They know nothing of the Dual Nature of Christ.

Jesus is called Jehovah,

We learn in Numbers 21 that the Israelites tempted Jehovah. This is applied to Christ by the apostle in I Corinthians 10:9 when he says, ¨Neither let us tempt Christ, as some of them also tempted, and were destroyed of serpents.

Nor is Christ merely called Jehovah but Jehovah our righteousness (Jeremiah 23:6.) Christ is our righteousness and thus our God (2 Peter 1:1).

The Great God

He is called the great God and Saviour, Titus 2:13

Someone says but that is not speaking of Christ. Excuse me! Read the next verse. This Great God and Saviour gave Himself for our sins (verse 14). Therefore, Jesus is both the great God and Saviour. That’s good news for those of us who have trusted Him.

If language has any meaning, then we must look no further than Christ Jesus to discover God.

Attributes

Not only is Christ called God, but also the attributes of the Godhead are credited to him.

Eternity is ascribed to Him: for he is said to be before Abraham (John 8. 58). This evidently proves that Christ existed before he was born of a virgin.

Jesus is said to be Omniscience: Peter confessed ‘Lord, you know all things.’

He is Omnipresence: Matthew 18:10. Jesus Himself said, “Where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.”

Omnipotence …Divine power is attributed to Him (Hebrews 1:1). He upholds all things by the word of His power.

These things are sufficient to prove that Christ is God. The names of God and the attributes of the Godhead are ascribed to him: But there is more.

Works.

The works which only God can perform, are ascribed to the Lord Jesus. Creation is ascribed to Him. Hebrews 1:10. “Thou, Lord, in the beginning hath laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the works of thine hands.” This is further confirmed in John 1:3, “All things were made by him, and without him was not anything made that was made.”

Additional witness is given in Colossians 1:16. It reads; “By him were all things created that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones or dominions, or principalities or powers; all things were created by him, and for him.”

The Government of the universe is ascribed to him in Hebrews 1:3 where we are told that he is upholding all things by the word of his power.

The work of our Salvation is ascribed fully to Christ (Matthew 1:21). It would be great error to deny it, when it is evident from so many places in the New-Testament. Furthermore,

Redemption is His (Acts 20:28).

Remission of sins is His to give (Matthew.9: 6).

Eternal Life is His to give (John 10:28).

The building of the Church is credited to Him. This again is strong proof that He is God for “He that built all things is God” (Hebrews 3:4).

Jesus is the Lord God. We worship Him (Matthew 28:9) and believe on Him (John 14:1).

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

Advertisements

The Wednesday Word: More about the Mystery of Christ

Colossians 2:9, “For the fullness of the Godhead dwells bodily in Him.”

Sadhu Sundar Singh, an Indian preacher of another generation, used to illustrate the incarnation mystery in this way. A simple countryman was being shown a red glass bottle. They told him it was full of milk. The countryman couldn’t believe it was filled with white liquid till he saw the beverage poured out from it. The redness of the bottle had hidden the colour of the contents of the bottle.

Sadhu said, so it was and is with our Lord’s humanity. Man saw Him tired, hungry, suffering, weeping and thought He was only man. ‘He was made in the likeness of men,’ yet He ever is ‘God over all, blessed forever.

The red milk bottle is a good illustration but there is an even better one and that is the Tabernacle in the days of Moses. It looked plain and ordinary on the outside, but inside it housed the very glory and presence of God. What a glorious picture of Christ! He looked just like an ordinary man, but the fulness of the Godhead dwelt in Him.

In Colossians 2:9, we see our New Testament Tabernacle. We see once more that Jesus is both human and divine. Of course, Christ’s enemies say that here the word ‘Godhead’ does not actually mean Godhead or they say that this verse means that it was merely the power of God which dwelt in Christ. It is astonishing to discover the hatred that men still harbour towards Jesus and the truth of His deity. However, the Bible cannot be clearer on Christ’s identity than it is in this verse. This verse, according to Calvin,

“ … means simply, that God is wholly found in him (Christ), so that he who is not content with Christ alone, desires something better and more excellent than God. The sum is this, that God has manifested himself to us fully and perfectly in Christ.”

Calvin’s Commentaries.

In Isaiah 11:2-5, we are given a prophetic picture of the Lord Jesus which conveys something of this fullness. There we read,

“..and the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon Him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord; and shall make Him of quick understanding in the fear of the Lord: and He shall not judge after the sight of His eyes, neither reprove after the hearing of His ears: but with righteousness shall He judge the poor, and reprove with equity for the meek of the earth: and He shall smite the earth with the rod of His mouth, and with the breath of His lips shall He slay the wicked. And righteousness shall be the girdle of His loins, and faithfulness the girdle of His reins.

Notice how Christ demonstrates the sevenfold Spirit of God!

The Spirit of the Lord.

The Spirit of Wisdom.

The Spirit of Understanding.

The Spirit of Counsel.

The Spirit of Might.

The Spirit of Knowledge.

The Spirit of the Fear of the Lord.

The fullness and perfections of the Godhead were and are truly manifest in the Lord Jesus. The foundation of our faith then is that He who died on the cross was God incarnate. When we meet Christ Jesus, we meet with God in His fullness. This is the foundation upon which we can build our life and eternal destiny.

“Mortals with joy beheld his face,

Th’ eternal Father’s only Son;

How full of truth! how full of grace!

When through his eyes the Godhead shone.”

Isaac Watts

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word: Yes Indeed, He Must be God!

“Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ” (Titus 2:13).

When the first missionaries arrived in Japan they encountered a young Japanese man who wanted to improve his knowledge of English. So they gave him the Gospel of John to translate. In a short time, the would-be learner became very restless and agitated. At last, he gushed out with the question, “Who is this Man about whom I have been reading, this Jesus? You call him a man, but He must be God.”

Yes indeed, He must be God!

But, not only can we say, He must be God, we can, with certainty, declare that He is, in fact, God. Notice how His deity is spoken of loudly and clearly in Titus 2:13. Observe how Jesus is clearly and plainly designated as the ‘great God.’

There can be no ambiguity about His deity. This passage is unmistakably about Christ.

In verse 11, He is called the ‘grace of God’, and in verse 13, He is designated as the ‘great God.’ Then, in verse 14, this same one who is termed the ‘grace of God’ and the ‘great God’ is said to be the one who has redeemed His people from all iniquity. It doesn’t get plainer than that.

Those who deny the deity of Christ try to argue that this verse says both the Father and the Son will appear at the blessed hope. However, nowhere in Paul’s epistles is the Father said to ‘appear.’ The word ‘appear,’ on the other hand, is used continuously of Christ. He is the revelation of the one True and Living God. He ‘appeared,’ as already mentioned, in verse 11 of this chapter. In 1 Timothy 6:14 we are told to, “keep this commandment without spot, unrebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ.” And we are informed He shall “judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom;” 2 Timothy 4:1.

The One who will appear is both the great God and our Saviour. What a stunning and humbling thought this is, that the man who suffered and shed His blood for us is none other than the great God whom the Old Testament declares to be;

“God of gods, and Lord of lords, a great God, a mighty, and a terrible, which regards not persons, nor takes reward:” (Deuteronomy 10:17).

This same great God who died for His people and rose again from the dead will appear a second time. For;

“Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto those that look for him will he appear the second time, without sin, unto salvation, (Hebrews 9:28).

So, when we read that we are, “Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;” (Titus 2:13), we know that, contrary to the JW (Jehovah Witness) teaching, Christ is in no way to be considered the little God, but the great one.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

God teaches us the truth that He alone is God by cutting down the pride of man

Spurgeon 3But, lastly, mark how God has cut down the pride of man, and has exalted himself by the persons whom he has called to look. “Look unto me and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth.” When the Jew heard Isaiah say that, “Ah!” he exclaimed “you ought to have said, Look unto me, O Jerusalem and be saved. That would have been right. But those Gentile dogs are they to look and be saved?” “Yes,” says God, I will show you, Jews, that though I have given you many privileges, I will exalt others above you, I can do as I will with my own.”

Charles H. Spurgeon- Sovereignty and Salvation-A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath Morning, January 6

God teaches us the truth that He alone is God by commanding us to look to Him alone for salvation, instead of a priest

Spurgeon 12. But the second thought is, the means of salvation. It is, “Look unto me and be ye saved.” You have often observed, I am sure, that many people are fond of an intricate worship-an involved religion-one they can hardly understand. They cannot endure worship so simple as ours. Then they must have a man dressed in white, and a man dressed in black; then they must have what they call an altar and a chancel. After a little while that will not suffice, and they must have flowerpots and candles. The clergyman then becomes a priest, and he must have a variegated dress, with a cross on it. So it goes on: what is simply a plate becomes a paten, and what was once a cup becomes a chalice; and the more complicated the ceremonies are, the better they like them. They like their minister to stand like a superior being.

Charles H. Spurgeon- Sovereignty and Salvation-A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath Morning, January 6

God has taught the Church the truth that He alone is God

Spurgeon 3“Surely,” says one, “the church of God does not need to be taught this.” Yes, we answer, she does; for of all beings, those whom God has made the objects of his grace are perhaps the most apt to forget this cardinal truth, that he is God, and that beside him there is none else. How did the church in Canaan forget it, when they bowed before other gods, and therefore he brought against them mighty kings and princes, and afflicted them sore. How did Israel forget it! and he carried them away captive into Babylon. And what Israel did in Canaan, and in Babylon, that we do now. We too, too often forget that he is God, and beside him there is none else. Doth not the Christian know what I mean, when I tell him this great fact? For hath he not done it himself? In certain times prosperity has come upon him, soft gales have blown his bark along, just where his wild will wished to steer; and he has said within himself, “Now I have peace, now I have happiness, now the object I wished for is within my grasp, now I will say, Sit down, my soul, and take thy rest; eat, drink, and be merry; these things will well content thee make thou these thy God, be thou blessed and happy.” But have we not seen our God dash the goblet to the earth, spill the sweet wine, and instead thereof fill it with gall? and as he has given it to us, he has said-”Drink it, drink it: you have thought to find a God on earth, but drain the cup and know its bitterness “When we have drunk it, nauseous the draught was, and we have cried, “Ah! God, I will drink no more from these things; thou art God, and beside thee there is none else.” And ah! how often, too, have we devised schemes for the future, without asking God’s permission? Men have said, like those foolish ones whom James mentioned, “We will do such-and-such things on the morrow, we will buy and sell and get gain.” whereas they knew not what was to be on the morrow, for long ere the morrow came they were unable to buy and sell, death had claimed them, and a small span of earth held all their frame. God teaches his people every day by sickness, by affliction, by depression of spirits, by the forsakings of God, by the loss of the Spirit for a season, by the lackings of the joys of his countenance, that-he is God, and that beside him there is none else. And we must not forget that there are some special servants of God raised up to do great works, who in a peculiar manner have to learn this lesson. Let a man for instance, be called to the great work of preaching the gospel. He is successful; God helps him, thousands wait at his feet, and multitudes hang upon his lips; as truly as that man is a man, he will have a tendency to be exalted above measure, and too much will he begin to look to himself, and too little to his God. Let men speak who know, and what they know let them speak and they will say, “It is true, it is most true.” If God gives us a special mission we generally begin to take some honor and glory to ourselves. But in the review of the eminent saints of God, have you never observed how God has made them feel that he was God, and beside him there was none else; Poor Paul might have thought himself a god; and been puffed up above measure, by reason of the greatness of his revelation, had there not been a thorn in the flesh. But Paul could feel that he was not a god, for he had a thorn in the flesh, and gods could not have thorns in the flesh. Sometimes God teaches the minister by denying him help on special occasions. We come up into our pulpits, and say, “Oh! I wish I could have a good day to-day!” We begin to labor we have been just as earnest in prayer, and just as indefatigable; but it is like a blind horse turning round a mill, or like Samson with Delilah: we shake our vain limbs with vast surprise, “make feeble flight,” and win no victories. We are made to see that the Lord is God, and that beside him there is none else. Very frequently God teaches this to the minister, by leading him to see his own sinful nature. He will have such an insight into his own wicked and abominable heart, that he will feel as he comes up the pulpit stairs, that he does not deserve so much as to sit in his pew, much less to preach to his fellows. Although we feel always joy in the declaration of God’s Word, yet we have known what it is to totter on the pulpit steps, under a sense that the chief of sinners should scarcely be allowed to preach to others. Ah! beloved, I do not think he will be very successful as a minister, who is not taken into the depths and blackness of his own soul, and made to exclaim, “Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ.” There is another antidote which God applies in the case of ministers. If he does not deal with them personally, He raises up a host of enemies that it may be seen that he is God, and God alone. An esteemed friend sent me, yesterday, a valuable old MS. of one of George Whitfield’s hymns which was sung on Kennington Common. It was a splendid hymn, thoroughly Whitfieldian all through. It showed that his reliance was wholly on the Lord, and that God was within him. What! will a man subject himself to the calumnies of the multitude, will he toil and work day after day unnecessarily, will he stand up Sabbath after Sabbath, and preach the gospel, and have his name maligned and slandered, if he has not the grace of God in him? For myself, I can say, that were it not that the love of Christ constrained me, this hour might be the last that I should preach, so far as the case of the thing is concerned. “Necessity is laid upon us, yea, woe is unto us if we preach not the gospel.” But that opposition through which God carries his servants, leads them to see at once that he is God, and that there is none else. If every one applauded, if all were gratified, we should think ourselves God; but, when they hiss and hoot, we turn to our God, and cry,

“If on my face, for thy dear name,

Shame and reproach should be,

I’ll hail reproach and welcome shame

If thou’lt remember me.”

Charles H. Spurgeon- Sovereignty and Salvation-A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath Morning, January 6

God has taught empires the truth that He alone is God

Spurgeon 3Mark ye, yet again, how God has taught this truth to empires. Empires have risen up, and have been the gods of the era; their kings and princes have taken to themselves high titles, and have been worshipped by the multitude, But ask the empires whether there is any besides God. Do you not think you hear the boasting soliloquy of Babylon-”I sit as a queen, and am no widow; I shall see no sorrow, I am god, and there is none beside me?” And think ye not now, if ye walk over ruined Babylon, that ye will meet ought save the solemn spirit of the Bible, standing like a prophet grey with age and telling you that there is one God, and that beside him there is none else? Go ye to Babylon, covered with its sand, the sand of its own ruins; stand ye on the mounds of Nineveh, and let the voice come up- ” There is one God, and empires sink before him; there is only one potentate, and the princes and kings of the earth with their dynasties and thrones are shaken by the trampling of his foot.” Go, seat yourselves in the temple of Greece; mark ye there what proud words Alexander once did speak, but now where is he, and where his empire too? Sit on the ruined arches of the bridge of Carthage; or walk ye through the desolated theatres of Rome, and ye will hear a voice in the wild wind amid those ruins-”I am God, and there is none else.” “O city, thou didst call thyself eternal. I have made thee melt away like dew. Thou saidst ‘I sit on seven hills, and I shall last for ever,’ I have made thee crumble, and thou art now a miserable and contemptible place, compared with what thou wast. Thou wast once stone, thou madest thyself marble. I have made thee stone again, and brought thee low.” Oh! how has God taught monarchies and empires that have set themselves up like new kingdoms of heaven, that he is God, and that there is none else!

Charles H. Spurgeon- Sovereignty and Salvation-A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath Morning, January 6