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Posts Tagged ‘Anguish’

Trials and afflictions will prove whether or not you are of this world

December 8, 2014 1 comment

Spurgeon 1II. But now for treating this text EXPERIMENTALLY.

Do we, dearly beloved, feel this truth? Has it ever been laid to our souls, so that we can feel it is ours? “They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.” Have we ever felt that we are not of the world? Perhaps there is a believer sitting in a pew to-night, who says, “Well, sir, I can’t say that I feel as if I was not of the world, for I have just come from my shop, and worldliness is still hanging about me.” Another says, “I have been in trouble and my mind is very much harassed — I can’t feel that I am different from the world; I am afraid that I am of the world.” But, beloved, we must not judge ourselves rashly, because just at this moment we discern not the spot of God’s children. Let me tell you, there are always certain testing moments when you can tell of what kind of stuff a man is made. Two men are walking, part of the way their road lies side by side. How do you tell which man is going to the right, and which to the left? Why, when they come to the turning point. Now, to-night is not a turning point, for you are sitting with worldly people here, but at other times we may distinguish.

Let me tell you one or two turning points, when every Christian will feel that he is not of the world. One is, when he gets into very deep trouble. I do believe and protest, that we never feel so unearthly as when we get plunged down into trouble. Ah! when some creature comfort hath been swept away, when some precious blessing hath withered in our sight, like the fair lily, snapped at the stalk; when some mercy has been withered, like Jonah’s gourd in the night — then it is that the Christian feels, “I am not of the world.” His cloak is torn from him, and the cold wind whistles almost through him; and then he says, “I am a stranger in the world, as all my fathers were. Lord, thou hast been my dwelling-place in all generations.” You have had at times deep sorrows. Thank God for them! They are testing moments. When the furnace is hot, it is then that the gold is tried best. Have you felt at such a time that you were not of the world? Or, have you rather sat down, and said, ‘Oh! I do not deserve this trouble?” Did you break under it? Did you bow down before it and let it crush you while you cursed your Maker? Or did your spirit, even under its load, still lift itself unto him, like a man all dislocated on the battle-field, whose limbs are cut away, but who still lifts himself up as best he can, and looks over the field to see if there be a friend approaching. Did you do so? Or did you lie down in desperation and despair? If you did that, methinks you are no Christian; but if there was a rising up, it was a testing moment, and it proved that you were “not of the world,” because you could master affliction; because you could tread it under foot, and say —

“When all created streams are dry,
His goodness is the same;
With this I well am satisfied,
And glory in his name.”

 

Charles H. Spurgeon-The Character of Christ’s People-Delivered on Sabbath Morning, November 22, 1855

A Converted Man Thinks it Good to be Afflicted

September 4, 2012 Leave a comment

When the mind is thoroughly convinced that God can, consistently with His honour, willingly receive to favour the most naked, forlorn, wretched, guilty, hell-deserving of the human race, and become a Father and Friend to him, he is happier than if all the world was his own. When God is his sensible Portion, everything else fades into utter insignificance. The fig tree may not blossom, nor any fruits be in the vine, yet he will “joy in the God of his salvation” (Hab. 3:18). The Apostle, Paul, although a prisoner at Rome, not in the least dejected, cries “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice” (Phil. 4:4). When God is chosen as our supreme Good, all earthly idols are rejected, and our treasure is laid up in Heaven. In proportion as grace flourishes in the heart our comforts will remain, let outward things go as they will; yea, it will be found that it is “good to be afflicted” (Psa. 119:71).

Arthur W. Pink–Studies in the Scriptures February, 1937 The Spirit Transforming.

God’s Wrath Awaits Unrepentant Sinners

Because God is so good, etc. Thus despising the riches of divine goodness, and forbearance and longsuffering-not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth him to repentance, after his hardness and impenitent heart, and with a stiff neck, he perseveres in his course of rebellion, treasuring up unto himself wrath against the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God. O, the awful reckoning that awaits such offenders!

Asahel Nettleton-The Destruction of Hardened Sinners       

Concerning Entertaining Sorrows

Sorrows, because they are lingering guests, I will entertain but moderately, knowing that the more they are made of the longer they will continue: and for pleasures, because they stay not, and do but call to drink at my door, I will use them as passengers with slight respect. He is his own best friend that makes the least of both of them.

Joseph Hall

God’s Chastisements Should Melt our Hearts

February 20, 2012 Leave a comment

For a Christian to defy adversities is to “despise” chastisement. Instead of hardening himself to endure stoically, there should be a melting of the heart.

Arthur W. Pink

Concerning God’s Chastisement

February 16, 2012 Leave a comment

Chastisement is designed for our good, to promote our highest interests. Look beyond the rod to the All-wise hand that wields it!

Arthur W. Pink

Life Carries Pain

October 11, 2011 1 comment

“What!” cries one, “Is there not a terrible amount of pain connected with death?” I answer, No. It is life that has the pain; death is the finis of all pain. You blame death for the disease of which he is the cure.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) _Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit_