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The Translation of the Phrase “the Lord’s Day”

Copyright © 2016 Richard C. Barcellos. All rights reserved.

Note the translation of the particular phrase under consideration—“the Lord’s day.” It is not translated “the day of the Lord,” as in 2 Peter 3:10, because it is a different construction and uses a different word for “Lord.” Second Peter 3:10 reads, ἡμέρα κυρίου (hēmera kyriou [“the day of the Lord”]). The word κυρίου (kyriou [“of the Lord”]) is a genitive masculine singular noun. It comes from κύριος (kyrios), a noun meaning “Lord.” In the context of 2 Peter 3, “the day of the Lord” clearly refers to the eschatological day of the Lord, “the day of God, because of which the heavens will be destroyed by burning” (2 Pet. 3:12). Peter is clearly referring to the last day judgment, the day of the resurrection (see John 5:28-29 and 6:40).

Revelation 1:10, however, reads τῇ κυριακῇ ἡμέρᾳ (tē kyriakē hēmera [“the Lord’s day”]). The word κυριακῇ (kyriakē), translated “Lord’s,” is a dative feminine singular adjective, agreeing in case and gender with the noun it modifies…

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

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New Bible Translation

I came across this article over the weekend concerning a new Bible translation. Some believe that the Bible should be translated without cultural, political, or theological biases; while others think that the scriptures are to be translated to make them relevant to today’s society.

To be truthful about the matter, I would have to say that there is no translation that hasn’t been influenced by some bias; one way or another. Nevertheless, when translating the Bible, the Christian community needs to be as true to the original languages as possible; while at the same time making them readable in today’s society. Sometimes this might require a bias concerning which words to use. This is because when one translates a word from one language to another, there are at times words that are not equivalent in the translated language, to the word that is being translated. In other words, there are words that are in one language that have a particular meaning, but in the language being translated to, there may not be a word that would carry the same definition of the word being translated. This is why at times translators have to use a word that has the same idea as the one they are trying to translate.

This much said, I will leave you with the article. You can go to it here.