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Posts Tagged ‘Charismatic Beliefs’

Is the Existence of the NT Canon Incompatible with Claims of New Revelation?

January 12, 2016 1 comment

By Michael Kruger

“God has spoken to me.”

There are few statements that will shut down debate more quickly than this one. If Christians disagree over a doctrine, a practice, or an idea, then the trump card is always “God has spoken to me” about that. End of discussion.

But, the history of the church (not to mention the Scriptures themselves) demonstrates that such claims of private, direct revelation are highly problematic. Of course, this doesn’t mean that God doesn’t speak to people. The Scripture is packed with examples of this. But, these were typically individuals with a unique calling (e.g., prophet or apostle), or who functioned at unique times in redemptive history (e.g., the early church in Acts).

After the first century was over, and the apostles had died, the church largely rejected the idea that any ol’ person could step forward and claim to have direct revelation from God. This reality is probably best exemplified in the early Christian debate over Montanism.

Montanism was a second-century movement whose leader Montanus claimed to receive direct revelation from God. In addition, two of his “prophetesses,” Priscilla and Maximilla also claimed to receive such revelation. Such revelations were often accompanied by strange behavior. When Montanus had these revelations, “[He] became obsessed, and suddenly fell into frenzy and convulsions. He began to be ecstatic and to speak and to talk strangely” (Hist. Eccl. 5.16.7).

 

 

 

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Why Is the Prosperity Gospel Attractive?

January 13, 2014 1 comment

“Being poor is a sin” (Robert Tilton).

“If we please God we will be rich” (Jerry Savelle).

“God wants his children to wear the best clothes…drive the best cars and have the best of everything; just ask for what we need” (Kenneth Hagin, Sr.).

These are some bewildering but common statements from “prosperity gospel” preachers. Their god is a sort of cosmic entrepreneur who can be used, by tithing and offering, to attain what really matters: a prosperous life in merely earthly terms.

FROM SUCH PEOPLE TURN AWAY”

Paul compels us to stay away from “men of corrupt minds and destitute of the truth, who suppose that godliness is a means of gain” (1 Tim. 6:5). And in his second letter to Timothy he warns his son in the faith “that in the last days perilous times will come: For men will be lovers of themselves, boasters, proud… lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having a form of godliness but denying its power. And from such people turn away!” (2 Tim. 3:1-5).

Peter also advises us that, just as there were false prophets among the people of God in the old covenant, “there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies…And many will follow their sensuality, and because of them the way of truth will be blasphemed. And in their greed they will exploit you with false words” (2 Pet. 2:1-3; cf. Jude 11-16).

Sadly, in spite of the Scriptures’ clear warnings, the prosperity gospel has a large and growing group of followers. This isn’t hard to understand, since the message appeals so directly to our native greed. Yet it is sad and bewildering that many people remain in the movement for a long time, even their whole life, since its preachers cannot fulfill their promises.

 

Read the entire article over at 9Marks by clicking here.

Positive Confession in the Word of Faith Movement

November 19, 2013 2 comments

Positive Confession in the Word of Faith Movement by William F. Leonhart III

 

This paper was initially submitted in April of 2012 to Justin Peters in partial fulfillment of the requirements for his Winter 2012 course on The Theology of the Word of Faith Movement, which he taught at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, TX.

From the beginning, the essence of false religion has been false worship. When Satan tempted Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden, he did so by enticing them to give into the temptation to worship themselves. He told them, “You will be like God” (Genesis 3:5b; NASB).[1] Likewise, when Jesus told the rich, young ruler to sell all he had, give it to the poor, and follow Christ, “he was saddened, and he went away grieving, for he was one who owned much property” (Mark 10:22). This young man had fashioned the idol of riches in his heart and made it the object of his worship. Thus, it was “impossible” (vs. 27) for him to turn from his sin and follow Christ. The enemy has not changed from the beginning. Even today, there is a movement that teaches men to worship self, wealth, and even health. The Word of Faith movement teaches that Christians can have whatever they desire if they employ a method called positive confession. This doctrine is nothing more than a doctored version of Satan’s first lie. The church must employ a working knowledge of both the Word of Faith movement and the Scriptures in demonstrating to Word / Faith adherents the error of their doctrine of positive confession.

 

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Do Charismatics have a Specific Bible Commentator they Use?

It is really hard to define what Charismatics believe because they have no set beliefs that have been embedded in a creed, confession, or statement of faith. I am not saying that there are not several Charismatic denominations which have not put out some kind of small statement of what they believe the scriptures to teach; nevertheless, for the more part, Charismatic beliefs vary from Church to Church.

One of the main sources where Charismatics get their false views is from a Bible called ‘The Dake’s Annotated Bible.” Finis Jennings Dake was the compiler of all the notes and commentary that is prevalent in this annotated Bible.

Finis Jennings Dake was born in 1902 and died in 1987. He claimed that upon receiving conversion that he was able to quote thousands of scriptures, even though he had never once read the Bible. I want to say that there has never been any person in the history of the world who has ever received such a gift. God does not bypass our intellect when he works through us.

What most Charismatics do not know is that Finis Dake is not far removed from the Charismatics of today when it comes to gross and immoral sins. Finis Dake served six months in jail in 1937 because he had plead guilty to having sex with a sixteen year old girl, of whom he registered at a motel with, feigning to be husband and wife.

The doctrines taught in the Dake’s Bible are being used by Kenneth Hagen, Kenneth Copeland, Benny Hinn, Paul Crouch, and a host of others through the TBN network. These doctrines have more to do with occultic beliefs such as those put forth by Mormons.

I will retire from speaking for now and leave you to the article:

The Dake’s Bible and Confused Charismatic Theology by Joseph Chambers

This quote from Dake’s Bible is the very first New Testament note in the edition that I have owned since the early seventies. The edition I am quoting from is the sixth printing, December 1971.“Gr. Christos, ‘Anointed.’ – Used in N.T. 577 times. Like the name “Jesus” it has no reference to deity, but to the humanity of the Son of God, who became the Christ or the “Anointed One” 30 years after He was born of Mary. God “made” Him both Lord and Christ. The Heb. Is ‘Messiah’.” (Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible, Finis Jennings Dake, published by Dake Bible Sales, Inc, Lawrenceville, Georgia, New Testament, p. 1.)No Biblically solid minister or Bible student would accept the quote above. It is rank heresy and must be totally rejected or our view of Jesus Christ as the eternal Son of God is compromised. To suggest that Jesus became the Christ or the “Anointed One” thirty years after His birth is to commit heresy. This is an ancient heresy that is called “adoptionism.” Kenneth Scott Latourette stated in his book, History of Christianity, Volume I, the following:

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