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Posts Tagged ‘Cleansed’

An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith- Appendix Point 12

12. Though there be no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus, yet are they taught, and that effectually, to be ashamed of their sins Rom. 6:21; and to be sorry for them after a godly sort, 2 Cor. 7:9, 10, 11; yea to loath themselves for them; Ezek. 36:31. Because that sin is an evil and a filthy thing, and in its own nature tends to the provoking and dishonoring of God, being disobedience against God, and a thing which the most holy GOD declares Himself to loath and abhor; so that nothing but the blood of Christ could purge us from our sins, and reconcile us to God, Whom by sin we had offended. Therefore, the Saints both are, and must be grieved, and must judge themselves, because they have sinned against their holy and glorious God, and merciful and loving Father, I Cor. 11:31.

Benjamin Cox- An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith

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The Wednesday Word: The Purged Conscience

The work that purges the conscience has already been done and dusted. The more we understand this, the more we see there is no need for a guilty dread before the Father. The truth of the Gospel really does set us free. That is why a Gospel-educated conscience keeps us in perfect peace.

Of course, the truth of the purged conscience is only for those who have come to terms with their personal guilt. If you’ve seen, that by nature, you are a sinner, a dyed in the wool, incurable sinner. And, if you, as that wretched sinner, have by faith embraced the cross in repentance and are resting on the finished work alone, then a cleansed conscience is part of your inheritance.

The cleansed conscience sees that God Himself has disposed of our sins in a manner which has satisfied Him (Isaiah 38:17).

The question now is not whether or not the Father is satisfied that our sins have been paid for and put away. The question is, are we convinced that this has been done? Is our conscience informed about the accomplishments of God through the blood? Or is the guilt of old sins proving to have a longer than usual shelf life? Are old sins casting long shadows? If so, we need to apply the Gospel to ourselves.

Here’s the newsflash. The Father has laid all our sins on His spotless, sinless Son. This is the Lord’s doing and it is marvellous in our sight. Christ the Lamb poured out His blood and took our sins away. The blackest and worst of our sins have gone. They were laid on Christ Jesus, and now they are no more. The man who represents us before God has taken them away, and they will never again be found (Isaiah 43:25).

These truths, when received by faith, will heal the conscience.

But our capacity for unbelief is staggering. We know, in theory, that the Father is satisfied with the blood. We say we believe that to be the case, yet we scrape out an ever limping, frustrating Christian existence supported only by a broken and troubled conscience. Is it that our sin is too great for the blood? Is it that our case is too extreme for God? I hate to tell you, but if you think like that, it is nothing other than self-righteousness. What is so extraordinary about your sin that the blood of Christ cannot take it away?

If God assures us that our sins are taken away, then they are taken away! The man who represented you at the cross is now in heaven seated on the Throne of Cosmic Majesty! This means that we can, right now, enjoy the truth of a purged conscience.

May these truths sink into us. We will never be any more righteous than the blood of Christ has made us. We will never be more accepted than we already are in the ‘Beloved One’ (Ephesians 1:6). Works could not get us into right standing with God, and our failings cannot get us out. Peace with God and freedom from all condemnation can only be obtained and maintained in the Gospel.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

The Wednesday Word: Counted Dead

“For you are dead and your life is hid with Christ in God” (Colossians 3:3).

Here’s the good news: our salvation rests entirely upon the penal, substitutionary sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ. He, as our substitute, by Himself and on our behalf, exclusively satisfied the righteous demands of divine holiness and justice.

In the Old Testament, when the priest sprinkled the blood of the sacrifice on the worshipper (Exodus 24:8; Hebrews 9:19), that person was counted or reckoned as being dead! Being dead, it was further reckoned that he had, therefore, paid the penalty of the broken law. The worshipper was counted as having died in the person of his substitute. As long as the worshipper had not paid the death penalty, he was counted as unfit for God. However, as soon as he had paid the death penalty, through the death of his substitute, he was reckoned as now being unsoiled and fit for the Lord’s service.

For peace of conscience, we really need to grasp the great gospel truth of Christ our Substitute!

During the American Civil War, Union Army recruiters arrived at a certain home demanding that the man of the house join the army immediately. The man replied that he could not do so because he had already been killed in action two years ago. As it turned out, a neighbour had signed a ‘Substitute Volunteer’ paper and had gone to war in this man’s place. It was all done legally and since the substitute had died, the man the army had wanted to recruit was now reckoned as having already been killed in action. He, therefore, did not have to go to war as he had already been there and had died in the person of his substitute.

Because of the work of the Lord Jesus, our substitute, we are now reckoned as having already been punished for our sins (Isaiah 53:5). Yes, I know we weren’t physically punished at the cross, but legally we were (Romans 4:25). When Christ hung upon the cross, we legally hung there with him. His death was our death; His punishment was our punishment. We are now cleansed by His blood—- which is another way of saying that we have been made partakers of the death of Christ. The blood of Christ cleanses us by totally identifying us with the death of our Substitute.

We were once covered with guilt and under sentence of death, but our substitute, the Lord Jesus shed His blood (Matthew 26:28). In God’s eyes, that blood represents both his death and ours. He died as our substitute. The blood is shed for us, and in that way death, which is the law’s penalty, is reckoned legally to us. Legally we have died. We have been crucified with Christ and have undergone the death sentence; as a result, our guilt has passed away. We are cleansed! The fires of Hell have been doused for us with the blood of Jesus. This is good news we can live in!

Furthermore, our sin is taken away and Christ’s own righteousness is reckoned to us in its place (Philippians 3:9). This is how the believer makes use of the blood of Christ. Faith simply embraces and enjoys what the blood has already accomplished.

At the cross, Jesus was treated as having our sin. He was reckoned as the greatest sinner and rebel who had ever existed. All our sins were put on Him.

We know this, but have we ever paused to think about what it means? It means that our blasphemies and adulteries were reckoned as His. He took responsibility for all our lying, thieving, fornications and murders. This was awful for Him but wonderful for us. Martin Luther grasped this truth and wrote to a friend saying, “Learn to know Christ and him crucified. Learn to sing to him, and say, ‘Lord Jesus, you are my righteousness, I am your sin.”

Spurgeon said it like this; “The man, Christ Jesus, is exalted at the right hand of the majesty on high; and we, His elect, are in Him, crucified with Him, risen with Him .”(Ephesians 2:6)…….

We were:

One, when He died;
One, when He rose;
One, when He triumphed over His foes;
One, when in heaven He took His seat
And angels sang of hell’s defeat.

And that is the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Happy Debtor

Ten thousand talents once I owed, and nothing had to pay;

But Jesus freed me from the load, and washed my debt away.

Yet since the Lord forgave my sin, and blotted out my score,

Much more indebted I have been, than e’er I was before.

My guilt is cancelled quite I know, and satisfaction, made;

But the vast debt of love I owe can never be repaid.

The love I owe for sin forgiven, for power to believe,

For present peace and promised heaven, no angel can conceive.

That love of Thine, Thou sinner’s Friend! Witness Thy bleeding heart!

My little all can ne’er extend to pay a thousandth part.

Nay more, the poor returns I make I first from Thee obtain;

And ’tis of grace that Thou wilt take such poor returns again.

‘Tis well – it shall my glory be (Let who will boast their store)

In time and to eternity, to owe Thee more and more.

John Newton