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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 234

September 5, 2019 Leave a comment

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [The Editor of The Star].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, June 10, 1857.

SIR, —

I beg to call your immediate attention to several errors in an article in this morning’s Star headed” Mr. Spurgeon done by a pickle-selling Tartuffe.” I cannot imagine the origin of so extraordinary a statement, for it might as well have been said that Adam robbed my orchard as that Mr. had appropriated our funds. I am happy to say that the moneys for the new Tabernacle are “preserved” in the London and Westminster Bank, in two good names, and have never been placed in any jeopardy up to the present. It is very probable that Mr. was a hearer of mine; for, in a congregation of such magnitude, he may have been sometimes included; but he was not a member of my church, he did not hold a seat, nor did he regularly attend. He may have worn a white neckcloth, but he did not purchase it out of our funds, for he was in no way whatever connected with us beyond being an occasional attendant. If ever your informant has been under the sound of my ministry, I can only regret that I must put him down, with as one who did not hear to profit. Men should be cautious in their repetition of unfounded tales, and especially so in cases where the sacred name of religion is concerned.

I am,

Yours faithfully,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 233

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [A Correspondent].

NEWINGTON, S.E., June 12, 1869.

DEAR SIR, —

I have never, at any time in my life, said, believed, or imagined that any infant, under any circumstances, would be cast into hell. I have always believed in the salvation of all infants, and I intensely detest the opinions which your opponent dared to attribute to me. I do not believe that, on this earth, there is a single professing Christian holding the damnation of infants; or, if there be, he must be insane, or utterly ignorant of Christianity. I am obliged by this opportunity of denying the calumny, although the author of it will probably find no difficulty in inventing some other fiction to be affirmed as unblushingly as the present one. He who doubts God’s Word is naturally much at home in slandering the Lord’s servants.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 232

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [A Correspondent].

WESTWOOD.

DEAR SIR,—

One of the trials of my life is being perpetually requested to find situations of various sorts. How can I do this?

I am the last person to find a situation for anybody; for my study, my pulpit, and the duties of my calling fill up all my time, and I have no knowledge of any vacant situations.

No one ever writes me to tell me of vacant situations, and yet I am to find them. I am willing to do what I can, but I could as soon fly in the air as find a situation for anyone. It is out of my line altogether.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 231

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

WESTWOOD, 1887.

DEAR FRIEND, —

The Orphanage has a mouth which is for ever swallowing, and if it be not filled it will soon be crying out. This last calamity has never yet fallen upon me, for the Lord has supplied our needs from day to day most graciously. Glory be to His Name.

I am most grateful to you for your generous help….

The Lord recompense you according to His grace.

Now that we have girls as well as boys our expenses are doubled, but our subscriptions axe not increased to so large an extent, and sometimes we feel the water under the good ship to be a little shallow. Still, she floats.

I beg you to continue to remember me in your gifts and prayers.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 230

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

WESTWOOD.

DEAR FRIEND, —

If we are to rejoice with them that do rejoice, I am bound to shout with the boys and girls at Stockwell who are made happy by your bounty. You have helped to make a merry Christmas for them. May the Lord give you a full return in your own household and person!

May the blessing of the Father of the fatherless come into your soul like music from angelic harps.

Your kind gift…. was safely received.

Yours with all the good wishes of the season,

C. H. SPURGEON

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 229

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [Subscribers].

WESTWOOD.

DEAR FRIEND,—

Thank you heartily. Five hundred little mouths at Stockwell will be filled. My own heart is full already. How graciously does the Lord bless His people by causing them to bring forth the fruit of liberality to His cause.

By such kindness as yours I am kept free from all care about the needs of my large family of orphans, and thus I am the more free for the spiritual work which occupies me at all times.

Your gift…. has been received gratefully,

Yours most heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 228

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, March 4, 1887.

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

As the time for the College Conference draws nigh I am full of anxiety, and I would desire to let that anxiety condense into prayer. Please join me in that prayer.

Our sole desire is the glory of God, and this would be greatly promoted if we all made a distinct advance in the Divine life; this may be produced by the Holy Spirit through our communion with each other and the Lord. Let us bow low before the throne for this, and take hold upon the promises with a mighty faith.

It is comparatively a small matter to all but myself; but I hunger to be with you all the day every day. We love each other in the Lord, and yet see so little of each other that I am bitterly disappointed if taken from you by pain. Brother, pray that we may look each other in the face, and may together behold our Lord. ‘Would you do me the great service to set apart a little time privately to seek an unusual blessing? and it would, be a great gain if in addition you could lead your Church to pray with us. I pine for a heavenly shower to saturate us all.

Please answer the letters of Secretaries promptly. This is a huge business: ease us all you can.

Your loving friend,

C. H. SPURGEON.