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Posts Tagged ‘Confessions of Faith’

Charles H. Spurgeon is in the Sola Gratia Library

Just wanted to let everyone know that Charles H. Spurgeon is now part of the Sola Gratia Library. If you would like to read through his 63 volumes of sermons or maybe read his “All of Grace,” his “Commentary on Matthew,” or any of his other 60 plus books, then give my site a visit.

Also several more books have been added to the ‘Works of History’ page. Several Works have also been added to the main page of the library, such as: ‘The Works of Johnathan Edwards,’ several books by John Owen, etc…; and several commentaries have been added to my ‘Bible Commentary’ page.

The ‘Baptist Issues’ page has several new links and my ‘Creeds-Confessions’ page has several new links, including two links by my friend and Brother, Randall Klynsma: “A Case For Explicit Creedalism: Meaningful Togetherness Is Impossible Without It” By Randall Klynsma (and Rev. David Fagrey) (Pdf) and “The Complete Gospel: Biblical Faith as Summarized in the Creeds of the Early Church and the Heidelberg Catechism” by Randall Klynsma

I hope you enjoy these latest additions.

Hershel L. Harvell Jr.

To access the home page or any of the pages mentioned above, then click a link below

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Confessions of Faith Help Us Obey Biblical Mandates

by Tom Nettles

A Twofold Duty

Two consistent expectations of biblical Christianity—the declaration and the protection of the purity of the faith—gave rise to confessions. Apart from some statement of the content of the Faith, no one can give a convincing profession of personal faith. The believing heart proclaims its confidence toward both the Person and the truth that saves. Romans 10:9, 10 includes both of these: “If you confess with thy mouth that Jesus is Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes and is justified, and with the mouth one confesses and is saved” (ESV). The credo of righteousness through the completed work of Christ alone to which the heart gives consent is expressed publicly by submission to the Lordship of Christ. Before one can confess, he must understand and believe. When one confesses, it must be of truths previously embedded within the heart. Not only, therefore, is faith a matter of the heart, but it cordially consents to the testable proposition that “God raised him from the dead.”

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Six Ways a Church Should Use a Confession of Faith

by Jeff Robinson

Particular Baptist churches planted in the tumultuous soil of 17th century England grew up and bore fruit under a nasty set of doctrinal and methodological accusations, including that they subscribed to libertarian free will, denied original sin, that their pastors baptized women in the nude, and were opponents of church and crown.

Perhaps their most virulent and colorful opponent, Daniel Featley—a separatist persecutor deluxe—derisively dismissed our Baptist forebears, writing in a venom-filled pamphlet, “They pollute our rivers with their filthy washings.” Such was Baptist life under Charles I.

These nefarious charges and numerous others arose from leaders of the state church and led to decades of grinding persecution….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Confessions of Faith: The Bible, therefore, the Creed

by Tom Nettles

The Bible is a big book with numerous themes and doctrines. Consider the following four realities that drive us to summarize the doctrines of the Bible in a confession of faith.

1. The Progressive History of Graphe Drives us to Doctrinal Summary

Faithfulness to the Bible as the Word of God, singular in its meaning and authoritative for mind and heart, means that creedal formulas of doctrine serve the cause of real biblical knowledge. They neither detract from it nor substitute for it. When all the varieties of biblical literature are put together, from historical narrative to closely reasoned doctrinal instruction, the confidence of the biblical writers themselves….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

What are creeds and confessions?

by Paul Helm

At a time when Christian people are taken up with issues of human conduct and gender, and it seems that doctrine of God has been left behind, it is a great thing that people are discussing the Trinity. This post is about what sort of documents creeds and confessions are. I am chary about imputing to them a finality that they cannot possess. People have the liberty to think further. Confessions cannot be exact, final.

History

I think that those churches who recite the Nicene Creed in their liturgy, as the Church of England does in her communion service, cannot hope that history is a way of achieving further understanding. History tells us what happened and (more uncertainly) why. Perhaps the inclusion of the word ‘begotten’, said of the Son, was to match neo-Platonism. Interesting. But that does not help worshippers today. What is needed for understanding is meaning, in order to mitigate the puzzlement as the congregation recite the phrases, ‘begotten of the Father before all time’, ‘begotten not created’.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Confessions of Faith: “No Creed But The Bible”

by Tom Nettles

1. The Bible: A Matter of Faith

At the most basic level, every Christian should confess, “I have no creed but the Bible.” The Bible is meant to be believed. In matters of faith dependent upon revealed truth, therefore, the Christian should make no commitment of heart or head to a proposition not founded immediately upon Scripture.

In its first chapter, the Second London Confession makes clear this principle after discussing many of the various doctrines of Scripture:

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Keach’s Articles of Faith

December 29, 2015 Leave a comment

H/T Kenneth Clayton

In 1697, Benjamin Keach published “The articles of the faith of the Church of Christ, or, Congregation meeting at Horsley-down” because “the General and more Large Confession of the Faith of our Churches, is now out of Print; but that is not all, for that being 12 d. price, some cannot well purchase it.” and because certain beliefs held by his congregation (“that of Imposition of Hands upon baptized Believers as such, and singing of God’s Praise, &c.”) were not included in the 2nd London Baptist Confession.

Here are the sections related to covenant theology:

Of Original Sin.

*VII. WE do believe, that God having created Man, he entered into a Covenant of Life with him, upon the condition of perfect Obedience; making the first Adam a common Head to all his Seed: and that our first Parents being left to the freedom of their own Will, fell from the Estate wherein they were created, by eating of the forbidden Fruit: and that Adam being set up as a pub∣lick Person, we all sinned in him, and fell with him into a state of Sin, of Wrath and Misery; the Sinfulness of which state consists in the guilt of Adam‘s first Sin, the want of Original….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.