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Posts Tagged ‘Councils’

Website Update! More Pdf’s!

Just wanted to let everyone know that I have done another major update to my website. However, it isn’t as big as the one I announced a week or so ago. By the way, if you haven’t seen the newly designed site, then check it out here. Every url to every page has slightly changed, so be sure to book mark the site.

Now for the update: When you build a site offline, then you have to build every single page separately. This means that whatever is on your tool bars or side bars has to remain consistent because if it changes, if you get one broken link, then every toolbar or side bar has to be fixed on every single page. It is not like a site built online, whereby you fix the broken link on your tool bars or side bars in one place and it fixes the tool bar or side bar for every page. The reason being is that the online tool bars or side bars are the same for every page. In other words, you have a tool bar or side bar that is one unit which is used on every page. Considering I have around 34 pages, then what I link on the tool bar or side bar needs to remain consistent, in order that I have no broken links on these bars.

Therefore, this past weekend I have finished editing and building 60 pdf books consisting of catechisms, creeds, confessions, and Church councils. All 60 pdf’s contain my own personal title page. All 60 pdf’s have been uploaded and linked to my creeds-confessions page. Therefore, if you would like to download some catechisms, creeds, confessions, and Church councils, then please visit my page here. Some of these are linked to my tool bars, so I wanted them to stay linked.

Some of these documents are not found on your average website, so download and peruse them in your ministry or for personal study.

Here is a list of what has been placed up over the weekend:

Catechisms:

Catechism of the Waldenses (Pdf)

The Larger Catechism by Martin Luther 1529 (Pdf)

The Small Catechism by Martin Luther 1529 (Pdf)

The Catechism of the Church of Geneva by John Calvin 1545 (Pdf)

The Heidelberg Catechism 1563 (Pdf)

The Westminster Larger Catechism 1647 (Pdf) Put in Scripture proofs when I have time

The Westminster Shorter Catechism: Scripture proofs 1649 (Pdf)

A Catechisme for Babes, or, Little Ones by H. Jessey 1652 (Pdf)

A Short Catechism About Baptism by John Tombes 1659 (Pdf)

Instruction for the ignorant , John Bunyan’s Catechism 1675 (Pdf)

The Baptist Catechism–Keach’s Catechism 1677 (Pdf)

The Orthodox Catechism 1680 (Pdf)

The 1695 Baptist Catechism (Pdf)

The Philadelphia Baptist Catechism 1742 (Pdf)

A Catechism for Girls and Boys 1798 (Pdf)

Gadsby’s Catechism 1800 (Pdf)

A Catechism or Instructions for Children & Youth 1810 (Pdf)

The Baptist Catechism-Charleston Association of 1813 (Pdf)

Baptist Scriptural Catechism by Henry Clay Fish, D. D. 1850 (Pdf)

A Puritan Catechism with Proofs Compiled by C. H. Spurgeon 1855 (Pdf)

A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine by James P. Boyce, D. D. About 1872 (Pdf)

A Catechism of Bible Teaching by John Broadus 1892 (Pdf)

A Collection of Baptist Catechisms (Pdf)

 

Confessions:

The Schleitheim Confession 1527 (Pdf)

Anabaptist Confessions of Faith (Pdf)

The Augsburg Confession by Philip Melanchthon 1530 (Pdf)

The Second Helvetic Confession 1536 (Pdf)

The Scots Confession of 1560 (Pdf)

The Belgic Confession 1561 (Pdf)

Thirty Nine Articles of Religion 1571 (Pdf)

John Spilsbury and His Confession (Pdf)

Early English Baptist Associational Confessions (Pdf)

English Baptist General Confessions (Pdf)

English Baptist Separatists Confessions (Pdf)

London Baptist Confession of 1644 (Pdf)

The First London Baptist Confession of Faith 1646 Edition (Pdf)

An Appendix to a Confession of Faith, Benjamin Cox 1646 (Pdf)

The Westminster Confession of Faith 1647 (Pdf)

The Faith and Practice of Thirty Congregations 1651 (Pdf)

The True Gospel Faith Declared According to the Scriptures 1654 (Pdf)

Midland Confession of Faith 1655 (Pdf)

The Somerset Confession of Faith 1656 (Pdf)

1677-89 London Baptist Confession of Faith (Pdf)

Principles of Faith of the Sandy Creek Association (Pdf)

The Philadelphia Confession 1742 (Pdf)

Carter Lane Declaration of Faith 1757 (Pdf)

1833 New Hampshire Confession (Pdf)

The Abstract of Principles at adoption of charter by Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 1858 (Pdf)

American Baptist Confessions (Pdf)

 

Councils:

The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon 451 (Pdf)

The Canons of the Council of Chalcedon 451 (Pdf)

Council of Orange 529 A.D. (Pdf)

The Canons of Dordt 1618-1619 (Pdf)

 

Creeds:

Apostles Creed (Pdf)

The Nicene Creed (Pdf)

The Anthanasian Creed (Pdf)

 

Other:

The 95 Theses of Martin Luther (Pdf)

The Smalcald Articles-Luther 1537 (Pdf)

The TABLE-TALK of Martin Luther 1566 (Pdf)

 

Articles:

What is Catechism? by Zacharias Ursinus 1563 (Pdf)

Eight Reasons to Study Baptist History

by Jeff Robinson

I always begin church history classes the same way as our dear brother Tom Nettles, with a lecture called “Why Study Church History?” I’m not merely seeking to copycat my mentor; we live in an age in which what C.S. Lewis called “chronological snobbery”—the prioritizing of all things new and the despising of all things old—is beyond palpable.

Thus, students often need convincing that history is important. After all, many of their high school history courses were mere after-thoughts, taught by football coaches. But as my good friend Harry Reeder puts it, we must learn from the past to live effectively in the present and impact the future. Therefore, it is crucial that we know our history as Baptists. And here are eight fundamental reasons:

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The authority of scripture came not from the Church, but from the Spirit of God

October 30, 2013 1 comment

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015The authority of Scripture derived not from men, but from the Spirit of God. Objection, That Scripture depends on the decision of the Church.

Refutation,

I. The truth of God would thus be subjected to the will of man.

II. It is insulting to the Holy Spirit.

III. It establishes a tyranny in the Church.

IV. It forms a mass of errors.

V. It subverts conscience.

VI. It exposes our faith to the scoffs of the profane.

 

1. Before proceeding farther, it seems proper to make some observations on the authority of Scripture, in order that our minds may not only be prepared to receive it with reverence, but be divested of all doubt.

When that which professes to be the Word of God is acknowledged to be so, no person, unless devoid of common sense and the feelings of a man, will have the desperate hardihood to refuse credit to the speaker. But since no daily responses are given from heaven, and the Scriptures are the only records in which God has been pleased to consign his truth to perpetual remembrance, the full authority which they ought to possess with the faithful is not recognized, unless they are believed to have come from heaven, as directly as if God had been heard giving utterance to them. This subject well deserves to be treated more at large, and pondered more accurately. But my readers will pardon me for having more regard to what my plan admits than to what the extent of this topic requires.

A most pernicious error has very generally prevailed; viz., that Scripture is of importance only in so far as conceded to it by the suffrage of the Church; as if the eternal and inviolable truth of God could depend on the will of men. With great insult to the Holy Spirit, it is asked, who can assure us that the Scriptures proceeded from God; who guarantee that they have come down safe and unimpaired to our times; who persuade us that this book is to be received with reverence, and that one expunged from the list, did not the Church regulate all these things with certainty? On the determination of the Church, therefore, it is said, depend both the reverence which is due to Scripture, and the books which are to be admitted into the canon. Thus profane men, seeking, under the pretext of the Church, to introduce unbridled tyranny, care not in what absurdities they entangle themselves and others, provided they extort from the simple this one acknowledgment, viz., that there is nothing which the Church cannot do. But what is to become of miserable consciences in quest of some solid assurance of eternal life, if all the promises with regard to it have no better support than man’s judgment? On being told so, will they cease to doubt and tremble? On the other hand, to what jeers of the wicked is our faith subjected — into how great suspicion is it brought with all, if believed to have only a precarious authority lent to it by the good will of men?

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 7-Henry Beveridge Translation