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Posts Tagged ‘Creeds’

The Baptist Library Vol I Video

To buy the Baptist Library Vol I click here

Charles H. Spurgeon is in the Sola Gratia Library

Just wanted to let everyone know that Charles H. Spurgeon is now part of the Sola Gratia Library. If you would like to read through his 63 volumes of sermons or maybe read his “All of Grace,” his “Commentary on Matthew,” or any of his other 60 plus books, then give my site a visit.

Also several more books have been added to the ‘Works of History’ page. Several Works have also been added to the main page of the library, such as: ‘The Works of Johnathan Edwards,’ several books by John Owen, etc…; and several commentaries have been added to my ‘Bible Commentary’ page.

The ‘Baptist Issues’ page has several new links and my ‘Creeds-Confessions’ page has several new links, including two links by my friend and Brother, Randall Klynsma: “A Case For Explicit Creedalism: Meaningful Togetherness Is Impossible Without It” By Randall Klynsma (and Rev. David Fagrey) (Pdf) and “The Complete Gospel: Biblical Faith as Summarized in the Creeds of the Early Church and the Heidelberg Catechism” by Randall Klynsma

I hope you enjoy these latest additions.

Hershel L. Harvell Jr.

To access the home page or any of the pages mentioned above, then click a link below

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Website Update! More Pdf’s!

Just wanted to let everyone know that I have done another major update to my website. However, it isn’t as big as the one I announced a week or so ago. By the way, if you haven’t seen the newly designed site, then check it out here. Every url to every page has slightly changed, so be sure to book mark the site.

Now for the update: When you build a site offline, then you have to build every single page separately. This means that whatever is on your tool bars or side bars has to remain consistent because if it changes, if you get one broken link, then every toolbar or side bar has to be fixed on every single page. It is not like a site built online, whereby you fix the broken link on your tool bars or side bars in one place and it fixes the tool bar or side bar for every page. The reason being is that the online tool bars or side bars are the same for every page. In other words, you have a tool bar or side bar that is one unit which is used on every page. Considering I have around 34 pages, then what I link on the tool bar or side bar needs to remain consistent, in order that I have no broken links on these bars.

Therefore, this past weekend I have finished editing and building 60 pdf books consisting of catechisms, creeds, confessions, and Church councils. All 60 pdf’s contain my own personal title page. All 60 pdf’s have been uploaded and linked to my creeds-confessions page. Therefore, if you would like to download some catechisms, creeds, confessions, and Church councils, then please visit my page here. Some of these are linked to my tool bars, so I wanted them to stay linked.

Some of these documents are not found on your average website, so download and peruse them in your ministry or for personal study.

Here is a list of what has been placed up over the weekend:

Catechisms:

Catechism of the Waldenses (Pdf)

The Larger Catechism by Martin Luther 1529 (Pdf)

The Small Catechism by Martin Luther 1529 (Pdf)

The Catechism of the Church of Geneva by John Calvin 1545 (Pdf)

The Heidelberg Catechism 1563 (Pdf)

The Westminster Larger Catechism 1647 (Pdf) Put in Scripture proofs when I have time

The Westminster Shorter Catechism: Scripture proofs 1649 (Pdf)

A Catechisme for Babes, or, Little Ones by H. Jessey 1652 (Pdf)

A Short Catechism About Baptism by John Tombes 1659 (Pdf)

Instruction for the ignorant , John Bunyan’s Catechism 1675 (Pdf)

The Baptist Catechism–Keach’s Catechism 1677 (Pdf)

The Orthodox Catechism 1680 (Pdf)

The 1695 Baptist Catechism (Pdf)

The Philadelphia Baptist Catechism 1742 (Pdf)

A Catechism for Girls and Boys 1798 (Pdf)

Gadsby’s Catechism 1800 (Pdf)

A Catechism or Instructions for Children & Youth 1810 (Pdf)

The Baptist Catechism-Charleston Association of 1813 (Pdf)

Baptist Scriptural Catechism by Henry Clay Fish, D. D. 1850 (Pdf)

A Puritan Catechism with Proofs Compiled by C. H. Spurgeon 1855 (Pdf)

A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine by James P. Boyce, D. D. About 1872 (Pdf)

A Catechism of Bible Teaching by John Broadus 1892 (Pdf)

A Collection of Baptist Catechisms (Pdf)

 

Confessions:

The Schleitheim Confession 1527 (Pdf)

Anabaptist Confessions of Faith (Pdf)

The Augsburg Confession by Philip Melanchthon 1530 (Pdf)

The Second Helvetic Confession 1536 (Pdf)

The Scots Confession of 1560 (Pdf)

The Belgic Confession 1561 (Pdf)

Thirty Nine Articles of Religion 1571 (Pdf)

John Spilsbury and His Confession (Pdf)

Early English Baptist Associational Confessions (Pdf)

English Baptist General Confessions (Pdf)

English Baptist Separatists Confessions (Pdf)

London Baptist Confession of 1644 (Pdf)

The First London Baptist Confession of Faith 1646 Edition (Pdf)

An Appendix to a Confession of Faith, Benjamin Cox 1646 (Pdf)

The Westminster Confession of Faith 1647 (Pdf)

The Faith and Practice of Thirty Congregations 1651 (Pdf)

The True Gospel Faith Declared According to the Scriptures 1654 (Pdf)

Midland Confession of Faith 1655 (Pdf)

The Somerset Confession of Faith 1656 (Pdf)

1677-89 London Baptist Confession of Faith (Pdf)

Principles of Faith of the Sandy Creek Association (Pdf)

The Philadelphia Confession 1742 (Pdf)

Carter Lane Declaration of Faith 1757 (Pdf)

1833 New Hampshire Confession (Pdf)

The Abstract of Principles at adoption of charter by Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 1858 (Pdf)

American Baptist Confessions (Pdf)

 

Councils:

The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon 451 (Pdf)

The Canons of the Council of Chalcedon 451 (Pdf)

Council of Orange 529 A.D. (Pdf)

The Canons of Dordt 1618-1619 (Pdf)

 

Creeds:

Apostles Creed (Pdf)

The Nicene Creed (Pdf)

The Anthanasian Creed (Pdf)

 

Other:

The 95 Theses of Martin Luther (Pdf)

The Smalcald Articles-Luther 1537 (Pdf)

The TABLE-TALK of Martin Luther 1566 (Pdf)

 

Articles:

What is Catechism? by Zacharias Ursinus 1563 (Pdf)

Ligon Duncan on Why ‘No Creed But the Bible’ Is a Lousy Creed

What does it mean to be a confessional church? When making our case for a particular doctrine, is it fine to reference our confession of faith, or would it be best to just stick to Scripture? Isn’t the Bible enough for Christians in establishing our doctrine and practice? Should we demand church members subscribe to a particular view of a third-level doctrine?

These are among the practical questions that sit at the heart of confessional Christianity. I put these questions to Ligon Duncan, a longtime confessional Christian and TGC Council member. Duncan, former pastor of the historic First Presbyterian Church in Jackson, Mississippi, now serves as chancellor of Reformed Theological Seminary.

Is it biblical for the church to write and use confessions of faith?

Yes! It is absolutely biblical for a church to use a confession of faith. The famous shema of Deuteronomy 6:4—“Hear, O Israel: the LORD your God, the LORD is one”—is a confession of faith. It affirms the two ideas most basic to the Israel’s religion: that Yahweh exists, and that he is the one true God. In the New Testament, Paul calls these fundamental affirmations “trustworthy sayings.” Such basic statements highlighting the fundamental commitments of God’s people are found throughout Scripture.

What about writing confessions of faith? Again, yes. If you look at the history of creeds and confessions, you’ll see that human-created creeds and confessions arose out of the church’s desire to be faithful to Scripture’s clear teaching. Whenever false teachers were appealing to the Bible and twisting it to suit their own purposes, Christians defended the truth by clearly articulating their scriptural convictions with the most faithful language they could muster—and which the false teachers could not affirm. For instance, the word homoousios is not found in Scripture, but is designed to convey an indisputably scriptural idea about the deity of Christ and the consubstantiation of the Son with the Father. Arius and his company were unwilling to affirm it, and therefore that word was used to uphold biblical truth against heresy.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

How the Bible Relates to Man-Made Creeds

by Tom Nettles

The pivotal question of how one concedes authoritative force to a creedal, or confessional, proposition holds paramount importance in their use in pedagogical and disciplinary ways. If churches, associations, or denominations as a whole are to use their creeds as instruments of ordination, church instruction, and discipline, then some method of demonstrating the biblical character of their propositions must be clearly conceived. Phillip Schaff rightly reminds Christians, that “the Bible has, therefore, a divine and absolute, the Confession only an ecclesiastical and relative, authority.” Additionally, he warns that “any higher view of the authority of symbols is unprotestant and essentially Romanizing.” Having issued that caveat, he proposed, “Confessions, in due subordination to the Bible, are of great value and use.” He called them “summaries of the doctrines of the Bible, aids to its sound understanding, bonds of union among their professors, public standards and guards against false doctrine and practice” (Philip Schaff, Creeds of Christendom, 3 volumes, 1:7, 8.)

Confidence in the biblical authenticity of a creed’s content comes by familiarity with its historical and doctrinal context compared with…

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Ligon Duncan on Why ‘No Creed But the Bible’ Is a Lousy Creed

Jeff Robinson and Ligon Duncan

What does it mean to be a confessional church? When making our case for a particular doctrine, is it fine to reference our confession of faith, or would it be best to just stick to Scripture? Isn’t the Bible enough for Christians in establishing our doctrine and practice? Should we demand church members subscribe to a particular view of a third-level doctrine?

These are among the practical questions that sit at the heart of confessional Christianity. I put these questions to Ligon Duncan, a longtime confessional Christian and TGC Council member. Duncan, former pastor of the historic First Presbyterian Church in Jackson, Mississippi, now serves as chancellor of Reformed Theological Seminary.

Is it biblical for the church to write and use confessions of faith?

Yes! It is absolutely biblical for a church to use a confession of faith. The famous shema of Deuteronomy 6:4—“Hear, O Israel: the LORD your God, the LORD is one”—is a confession of faith. It affirms the two ideas most basic to the Israel’s religion: that Yahweh exists, and that he is the one true God. In the New Testament, Paul calls these fundamental affirmations “trustworthy sayings.” Such basic statements highlighting the fundamental commitments of God’s people are found throughout Scripture.

What about writing confessions of faith? Again, yes. If you look at the history of creeds and confessions, you’ll see that human-created creeds and confessions arose out of the church’s desire to be faithful to Scripture’s clear teaching. Whenever false teachers were appealing to the Bible and twisting it to suit their own purposes, Christians defended the truth by clearly articulating their scriptural convictions with the most…

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Confessions of Faith: The Bible, therefore, the Creed

by Tom Nettles

The Bible is a big book with numerous themes and doctrines. Consider the following four realities that drive us to summarize the doctrines of the Bible in a confession of faith.

1. The Progressive History of Graphe Drives us to Doctrinal Summary

Faithfulness to the Bible as the Word of God, singular in its meaning and authoritative for mind and heart, means that creedal formulas of doctrine serve the cause of real biblical knowledge. They neither detract from it nor substitute for it. When all the varieties of biblical literature are put together, from historical narrative to closely reasoned doctrinal instruction, the confidence of the biblical writers themselves….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.