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Posts Tagged ‘Early Church’

Stream for Free: 2017 Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College

January 30, 2017 2 comments

You can now stream all the messages from last week’s Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College for free on Ligonier.org, the Ligonier app, and YouTube.

Preaching God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Haykin

Living God’s Word: The Life of Augustine by Stephen Nichols

God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Kruger

Questions & Answers with Haykin, Kruger, Nichols, and Sproul

Generosity in the Early Church by David Briones

Heresy in the Early Church by Keith Mathison

The Reformation & the Early Church by John Tweeddale

We’re thankful for the partnership of Ligonier Ministries in hosting this conference at Reformation Bible College. We encourage you to learn more about their numerous upcoming conferences and study opportunities in 2017.

Source [Ligonier Ministries]

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A Reminder- February Module: Early Church Fathers taught by Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin

Early+Church+-+Feb+Mod+opt+2-1

The lectures will serve as a part of the curriculum for RBS’s course HT 511 Early Church and will provide an overview of the theological and literary history of the Patristics from the end of the Apostolic era to the rise and spead of Islam. The course aims to equip the student with a basic understanding of the key figures, events, and issues in the history of the Patristic era, as well as to offer the student an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the Patristic leaders and writers.

 

Syllabus

Schedule

Register- Go to source page below and click register.

 

 

Source [Reformed Baptist Seminary]

Sam Storms and Two Types of Tongues

April 22, 2014 1 comment

In last week’s post, we introduced a series about the gift of tongues. Cessationists generally define the gift of tongues as the supernatural ability to speak authentic foreign languages that the speaker had not previously learned. Continuationists, by contrast, generally allow for the possibility that the gift produces speech that does not correspond to any human language. The question we are asking in this series is whether or not that possibility is biblically warranted.

Does the Gift of Tongues Produce Non-Human Languages?

Most continuationists acknowledge that modern tongues-speech predominately consists of something other than human foreign languages.

Of course, some continuationists point to anecdotal evidence to claim that modern glossolalia (tongues-speaking) can sometimes consist of human languages. But even supporters of modern tongues, like George P. Wood of the Assemblies of God, admit the infrequency of such reported occurrences. After commenting on alleged accounts “where one person spoke in a tongue that a second person recognized as a human language,” Wood is quick to state: “Admittedly, such occurrences are rare” (from his review of Strange Fire, published Jan. 13, 2014).

 
Read the entire article here.

Are Tongues Real Languages?

February 25, 2014 5 comments

Here is an outstanding article that explains what the gifts of tongues actually consisted of and was believed to be: by the Early Church, the Reformers, and the founders of the modern Pentecostal movement. All affirmed that this gift was the ability to speak in other languages, of which the speaker had never learned. The founders of the modern Pentecostal movement also confessed that this is what the gift of tongues consisted of, until they began to speak in utterances and realized that none of them had actually spoken a foreign language. The founders of the modern Pentecostal movement, then came up with a new doctrine, in which they taught, that some tongues are unintelligible prayer languages. This false view of tongues is not found anywhere in scripture. Here is a portion of the article:

 

We begin today’s post with a question: In New Testament times, did the gift of tongues produce authentic foreign languages only, or did it also result in non-cognitive speech (like the private prayer languages of modern charismatics)? The answer is of critical importance to the contemporary continuationist/cessationist debate regarding the gift of tongues.

From the outset, it is important to note that the gift of tongues was, in reality, the gift of languages. I agree with continuationist author Wayne Grudem when he writes:

It should be said at the outset that the Greek word glossa, translated “tongue,” is not used only to mean the physical tongue in a person’s mouth, but also to mean “language.” In the New Testament passages where speaking in tongues is discussed, the meaning “languages” is certainly in view. It is unfortunate, therefore, that English translations have continued to use the phrase “speaking in tongues,” which is an expression not otherwise used in ordinary English and which gives the impression of a strange experience, something completely foreign to ordinary human life. But if English translations were to use the expression “speaking in languages,” it would not seem nearly as strange, and would give the reader a sense much closer to what first century Greek speaking readers would have heard in the phrase when they read it in Acts or 1 Corinthians. (Systematic Theology, 1069).

But what are we to think about the gift of languages?

If we consider the history of the church, we find that the gift of languages was universally considered to be the supernatural ability to speak authentic foreign languages that the speaker had not learned.

 

Read the entire article here.

CHAPTER I-III

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN MARTYRS TO THE FIRST GENERAL PERSECUTIONS UNDER NERO

III. Philip

Was born at Bethsaida, in Galilee and was first called by the name of “disciple.” He labored diligently in Upper Asia, and suffered martyrdom at Heliopolis, in Phrygia. He was scourged, thrown into prison, and afterwards crucified, A. D. 54.

John Foxe-Foxe’s Book of Martyrs

Foxe’s Book of Martyrs-Contents

CHAPTER I HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN MARTYRS TO THE FIRST GENERAL PERSECUTIONS UNDER NERO

I. St. Stephen

II. James the Great

III. Philip

IV. Matthew

V. James the Less

VI. Matthias

VII. Andrew

VIII. St. Mark

IX. Peter

X. Paul

XI. de

XII. Bartholomew

XIII. Thomas

XIV. Luke

XV. Simon

XVI. John

XVII. Barnabas

 

CHAPTER II THE TEN PRIMITIVE PERSECUTIONS

CHAPTER III PERSECUTIONS OF THE CHRISTIANS IN PERSIA

CHAPTER IV PAPAL PERSECUTIONS

CHAPTER V AN ACCOUNT OF THE INQUISITION

CHAPTER VI AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERSECUTIONS IN ITALY, UNDER THE PAPACY

CHAPTER VII AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE AND PERSECUTIONS OF JOHN WICKLIFFE

CHAPTER VIII AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERSECUTIONS IN BOHEMIA UNDER THE PAPACY

CHAPTER IX AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE AND PERSECUTIONS OF MARTIN LUTHER

CHAPTER X GENERAL PERSECUTIONS IN GERMANY

CHAPTER XI AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERSECUTIONS IN THE NETHERLANDS

CHAPTER XII THE LIFE AND STORY OF THE TRUE SERVANT AND MARTYR OF GOD, WILLIAM TYNDALE

CHAPTER XIII AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE OF JOHN CALVIN CALVIN AS A FRIEND OF CIVIL LIBERTY

CHAPTER XIV AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERSECUTIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, PRIOR TO THE REIGN OF QUEEN MARY I

CHAPTER XV AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERSECUTIONS IN SCOTLAND DURING THE REIGN OF KING HENRY VIII

CHAPTER XVI PERSECUTIONS IN ENGLAND DURING THE REIGN OF QUEEN MARY

CHAPTER XVIII THE RISE, PROGRESS, PERSECUTIONS, AND SUFFERINGS OF THE QUAKERS

CHAPTER XIX AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE AND PERSECUTIONS OF JOHN BUNYAN

CHAPTER XX AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE OF JOHN WESLEY

CHAPTER XXI PERSECUTIONS OF THE FRENCH PROTESTANTS IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, DURING THE YEARS 1814 AND 1820

CHAPTER XXII THE BEGINNINGS OF AMERICAN FOREIGN MISSIONS

MISSIONARY BEGINNINGS