Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Eric Ayala’

8 Ways To Become A Heretic

by Eric Ayala

Very few people set out to intentionally become heretics. In fact, many heretics not only of today but also of the past started with the best of intentions but slid into heretical doctrines. Some heresy is blatant, bold and unmistakable for its error, but most of the time is it far more subtle than that. It can be surprisingly easy to become a heretic. Heresy often takes good concepts, good terms, or good ideas and changes them ever so slightly. This makes them hard to detect, and it also makes them incredibly dangerous. So while most of you don’t want to slip into heresy, listed below are 8 sure fire ways to become a heretic for those who do:

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

How Do You Learn To Pray?

By Eric Ayala

How do you learn how to ride a bike? Well, you read the instruction manual, watch presentations on YouTube, listen to podcasts, take a college lecture and study the views of famous bike riders, right? Well all of those things will expand your knowledge about bike riding, but it won’t help you at all to practically ride a bike unless you actually get on one. The best information or tips will only aid you if you are actually practicing the bike riding concepts. So how do you learn how to pray? Well I read books and study sermons on it and… you see where this is going. Prayer isn’t just something we learn about, it’s something that we do. Now I am, of course, not against studying about prayer as that will aid you in your proper practice of it. However, the only real way to learn how to pray… is by praying.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 3

By Eric Ayala

For the past two weeks we have been examining “The Trail of Blood” by J.M. Carroll. You can view those posts here: Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 1 and Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 2

Last time we looked at the beliefs of the various groups that J.M. Carroll places in his “Trail of Blood.” Mostly, it was simply a collection of heretics. It would seem that Carroll’s only real criteria of if someone was Baptist or not is that the church in general did not accept them. I know that some who may be adherents of the book may claim that the heretical beliefs mentioned of these groups were mere slander against them from the Papists. The problem however, is that Carroll offers no defense of them or explanation; he never interacts with these groups or their beliefs. Carroll merely mentions their name and then moves on without even linking any of his own marks of Baptist practice or distinctives to them. Not only does Carroll not excuse these groups, he doesn’t even acknowledge there is a problem with them, slanderous or otherwise. They are mere names on a list. There are many other points that we could talk about, but in the end, his thesis is disproven.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 2

September 30, 2015 Leave a comment

By Eric Ayala

Last week we examined the problems of J.M. Carroll’s anachronistic understanding of history. That post can be read here Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 1 Because Carroll claims that the Baptist line can be traced through various historical groups; we will thus examine them in this post, as it is central to his thesis. Carroll actually does little to establish these groups with any factual link to Baptists, but nonetheless he does list them in support of his claim.

So what groups comprise this Trail of Blood from his title?

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Mopping Up the Trail of Blood: Part 1

September 23, 2015 Leave a comment

By Eric Ayala

For those who, like me, grew up in an independent, fundamental Baptist church you may be familiar with a little book by J.M. Carroll entitled, “The Trail of Blood: Following the Christians Down through the Centuries or, The History of Baptist Churches from the Time of Christ, Their Founder, to the Present Day.” While that is quite a mouthful to say, this book published in 1931 is commonly referred to as simply, “The Trail of Blood.”

The main thesis of this booklet is that Baptists are not protestants, were thus never part of the Roman Catholic Church and can trace their continued denominational line all the way back to John the Baptist (which Carroll on more than one occasion implies may be a proper denominational name given to John by Christ himself). This post, and the next two that will follow, will examine the claims of the book and show them to be without any historical warrant.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

In Defense of Systematic Theology

September 9, 2015 Leave a comment

by Eric Eyala

There has been a welcomed rise in the field of Biblical Theology, especially in the areas of the covenants and redemptive history. Sometimes, however there is a perceived superiority or even direct combativeness of Biblical Theology to Systematic Theology. Some even go so far as to offer a narrative type of theology as an alternative to the man-made doctrinal systematic structures that have plagued Christianity for so long. The problem with the disdain of Systematic over Biblical theology however is, as the old adage goes, “there is no need to reconcile friends.” Biblical and Systematic Theology live in harmony with one another and support and defend each other.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The 1000 Year Blind Spot Of Church History

September 7, 2015 Leave a comment

by Eric Ayala

More people are awakening to appreciate the historic Christian church. The first step for many in this awakening was to be reintroduced to the tenets and confessions of the Protestant Reformation. This helped clear up some of the historic myopia of those who were only raised understanding general modern evangelicalism. While that initial awakening is good, considering the two thousand year history of Christianity, tracing your faith back to only the last five hundred years of the Reformation doesn’t exactly ground you in the wealth of the Christian heritage. So there has been another awakening as people look back to those whom the reformers consistently appealed to, the Church Fathers. This renewed interest in the Patristic era of Christianity has provided a necessary link between the New Testament history and the continued history of the church as it spread. This vital era gave us the great creeds and councils of the early church that provided clear statements of Biblical doctrines that help us guard against heresy and error. The problem, however, is that the church didn’t go straight from Nicaea to Westminster. When we focus on the first 500 years of the Christian church and then skip over to the last 500 years of the Christian church, we are leaving out 1000 years of our very own heritage.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.