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In the Greek emphasis is indicated by the order of words in a sentence

In the Greek emphasis is indicated by the order of words in a sentence:

“Now of Jesus Christ the birth was on this wise” (Matthew 1:18);

“But commendeth His love toward us” (Romans 5:8).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

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Hebrew Parallelism

In the Old Testament many examples are found of what is called Hebrew parallelism, in which the same thought is expressed in different language. For instance,

“He shall judge the world in righteousness, He shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness” (Psalm 9:8).

Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18, and compare Isaiah 1:18). In other cases the truth is driven home by a contrast:

“The curse of the Lord is in the house of the wicked: but He blesseth the habitation of the just” (Proverbs 3:33, and 15:17).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

A simple form of structural repetition occurs in the adoring language found at both the beginning and the end of Psalm 8

A simple form of structural repetition occurs in the adoring language found at both the beginning and the end of Psalm 8, “O Lord our Lord, how excellent is Thy name in all the earth!” Other forms of this principle are what are technically known as cyloides, or circular repetition, where the same phrase occurs at regular intervals, as in “Turn us again, O God” (Psalm 80:3, 7, 9); epibole, or overlaid repetition, where the same phrase is used at irregular intervals, as “the voice of the Lord” (Psalm 29:3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9); epimone, or lingering, where the repetition is with the design of making a more lasting impression, as in John 21:15-17, where our Lord continued to challenge the love of His erring disciple, and evinced His acceptance of his responses by His “feed My lambs, feed My sheep.”

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Another means and method employed by the Spirit to arrest our attention and focus our minds upon distinct portions of the Truth is His use of a great number of “figures of speech”

Another means and method employed by the Spirit to arrest our attention and focus our minds upon distinct portions of the Truth is His use of a great number of “figures of speech.” In them He has arranged words and phrases in an unusual manner for the purpose of more deeply impressing the reader with what is said. The learned author of The Companion Bible (now almost unobtainable) dealt more fully with this subject than any English writer, and from him we now select one or two examples. The figure of anabasis or graduation, in which there is the working up to a climax, as in

“Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justifieth. Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Romans 8:33, 34).

So again in 2 Peter 1:5-7, “add to your faith virtue… charity.” The opposite figure is that of catabasis or gradual descent, a notable instance of which is found in Philippians 2:6-8.

The more common form of emphasis is that of repetition. This is found in the Word in quite a variety of ways, as in the doubling of a name: “Abraham, Abraham” (Genesis 22:11). There were six other individuals whom the Lord thus addressed: “Jacob, Jacob” (46:2), “Moses, Moses” (Exodus 3:4), “Samuel, Samuel” (1 Samuel 3:10), “Martha, Martha” (Luke 10:41), “Simon, Simon” (22:10), “Saul, Saul” (Acts 9:4). Then there was our Lord’s pathetic “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem” (Matthew 23:37), and His cry of anguish, “My God, My God” (Matthew 27:46); as there will yet be the urgent “Lord, Lord” of the lost (Luke 13:25). Such intensified forms of expression as “the holy of holies,” “the song of songs, vanity of vanities,” and the unspeakable “for ever and ever,” express the same principle. Again,

“Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and He shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the Lord” (Psalm 27:14);

“Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice” (Philippians 4:4). Yet more emphatic is the “holy, holy, holy” of Isaiah 6:3, the

“O earth, earth, earth, hear the word of the Lord” (Jeremiah 22:29), and because it will not, the “I will overturn, overturn, overturn” (Ezekiel 21:27), with the resultant

“Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabitants of the earth” (Revelation 8:13).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

The Law of Emphasis

25. The law of emphasis. The fundamental importance and perpetuity of the moral law was intimated in its being written by God’s own finger, and by the two tables on which it was inscribed being placed for safe custody within the sacred ark. The inestimable value of the Gospel was signified in its being announced to the shepherds by an angel, “Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people,” and his being joined by a great multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

“Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men” (Luke 2:10, 14).

The relative weightiness of anything is generally indicated by the place and prominence given to it in the Scriptures. Thus, only two of the evangelists make mention of the actual birth of Christ; only one of them supplies us with any details about His boyhood; Mark and Luke alone refer to His ascension; but all four of them describe His sacrificial death and victorious resurrection! How plainly that tells us which should be most pressed by His servants, and which should most engage the hearts and minds of His people!

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Deity hesitates not to take as one of His titles “the Lord God of recompences” (Jeremiah 51:56), and has shown, all through His Word, that He deals with sinner and saint as such

Deity hesitates not to take as one of His titles “the Lord God of recompences” (Jeremiah 51:56), and has shown, all through His Word, that He deals with sinner and saint as such. Unto Joshua He said that if he gave His Word its proper place, meditated in it day and night, that he might observe to do according to all that is written therein, “then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success” (1:8, and cf. Job 36:11; Proverbs 3:1-4). On the other hand, He said to wayward Israel

“Why transgress ye the commandments of the Lord, that ye cannot prosper? because ye have forsaken the Lord, He hath also forsaken you” (2 Chronicles 24:20).

That is an unvarying principle in His government. Of Uzziah we read,

“as long as he sought the Lord, God made him to prosper” (2 Chronicles 26:5).

The judgment of God even upon Ahab’s kingdom was postponed “because he humbled himself before Me” said God (1 Kings 21:29). Contrariwise, He told David that the sword should never depart from his house “because thou hast despised Me” (2 Samuel 12:9, 10). The New Testament teaches the same thing.

“Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy” (Matthew 5:7).

“If ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (6:15);

“with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again” (7:2).

“Because thou hast kept the word of My patience, I also will keep thee” (Revelation 3:10).

God has established an inseparable connection between holiness and happiness, and it is no small part of the expositor’s work to point out that as our ways please Him His smile is upon us; but when we are wayward, we are greatly the losers; to show that though God’s people are not under the curse of the rod they are under its discipline; and for him to note scriptural illustrations of that fact. It is one thing to have our sins pardoned, but it is quite another to enjoy God’s favors in providence and nature as well as spiritually, as the lives of biblical characters clearly exemplify. God does not afflict willingly (Lamentations 3:33), but chastens because we give Him occasion to do so (Psalm 89:30-33). When we grieve not the Holy Spirit, He makes Christ more real and precious to the soul; the channel of blessing is unchoked, and real answers are received to prayer. But alas, how often we give God occasion to say “your sins have withholden good things from you” (Jeremiah 5:25). Then let the preacher miss no opportunity of proving from Scripture that the path of obedience is the path of blessing (Psalm 81:11-16), and demonstrate that God orders His ways with us according to our conduct (Isaiah 48:10) — He did so with Christ Himself (John 8:29; 10:17; Psalm 45:7).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

David recognized the laws of cause and effect and sowing and reaping in God’s governing of mankind

David acknowledged,

“The Lord recompensed me according to my righteousness, according to the cleanness of my hands in His eyesight” (Psalm 18:24).

He was alluding to God’s delivering him from his enemies, particularly from Saul. How had he conducted himself toward the king? Did he commit any sin which warranted his hostility? Did he injure him in any way? No, he neither hated Saul nor coveted his throne, and therefore that monarch was most unjust in so relentlessly seeking his life. So innocent was David in this respect that he appealed to the great Searcher of hearts:

“Let not them that are mine enemies wrongfully rejoice over me” (Psalm 35:19).

Thus, when he said, “The Lord recompense me according to my righteousness” he was far from giving vent to a pharisaical spirit. Instead, he was avowing his innocence before the bar of human equity. Since he bore his persecutor no malice, he enjoyed the testimony of a good conscience. In all that he suffered at the hand of Saul, David retaliated not: he not only refused to slay, or even injure, him when he was at his mercy, but he took every opportunity to serve the cause of Israel, notwithstanding the ingratitude, envy and treachery he received in return. In his deliverance and in having the throne conferred upon him, David recognized one of the basic principles operating in the Divine government of this world, and owned that God had graciously rewarded him because of his integrity.

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures