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Posts Tagged ‘God’s Grace’

Of Sin

OF SIN

SIN is the great block and bar to our happiness, the procurer of all miseries to man, both here and hereafter. Take away sin, and nothing can hurt us; for death, temporal, spiritual and eternal, is the wages of it.

Sin, and man for sin, is the object of the wrath of God. How dreadful therefore must his case be who continues in sin! for who can bear or grapple with the wrath of God!

No sin against God can be of little; because it is against the great God of heaven and earth; but if the sinner can find out a little God, it may be easy to find out little sins.

Sin turns all God’s grace into wantonness: it is the dare of his justice, the rape of his mercy, the jeer of his patience, the slight of his power, and the contempt of his love.

Take heed of giving thyself liberty of committing one sin, for that will lead thee to another, till by an ill custom it become natural.

To begin a sin is to lay a foundation for a continuance: this continuance is the mother of custom, and impudence at last the issue.

The death of Christ giveth us the best discovery of ourselves, in what condition we were in that nothing could help us but that; and the most clear discovery of the dreadful nature of our sins: for if sin be so dreadful a thing as to wring the heart of the Son of God, how shall a poor wretched sinner be able to bear it?

Mr. John Bunyan’s Dying Sayings

The Wednesday Word: Gospel Peace

And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, (Colossians 1:20 a)

The blood of Christ gives us a profound insight into God’s estimation of sin. God, being the God of justice, will by no means clear the guilty (Exodus 34:7). Sin has earned an awful debt, and all debts must be paid. We ought not to fool ourselves into thinking that God is some easy going, doddery, old grandfather who doesn’t notice sin. He notices and has done so from the beginning. And because He saw our sin, the Lamb of God went to the cross with this scripture in mind, “It is the blood that makes atonement for the soul” (Leviticus 17:11). Because Christ poured out His blood, peace has now been established between God and us. Indeed, there is only one foundation for peace, and that is the blood of Jesus. To enjoy this peace, therefore, our daily spiritual occupation is to, “Behold the Lamb of God” (John 1:29). He is the one who has paid for and taken away our sin.

In Luke 15:2 we are told, “This man (Jesus) receives sinners.” That means that, when we come to Christ our mercy seat, we are fully accepted, and the free gift of eternal life is ours. But you say, I don’t feel that I have a right to go to Him, my sin ‘s too big! Well, it’s your word against His. He says to come to Him, and he knows what He is talking about.

Old Tom Farrell, a Scottish blacksmith, had lived a God-defying life. But, in His mercy, the Lord brought him to trust in Christ alone. Some years later, he was on his death bed, and his wife asked him if he were scared to die. He looked at her, smiled and then said, “What would I be afraid of? I’m going to be with the Man who died for me.” Old Tom knew that peace had been made by the blood.

God’s grace is demonstrated to us through the shed blood of our substitute. In the Old Testament, the High Priest came to the Mercy Seat with the blood. In bringing the blood, he was confessing that both he and the people were sinners. When he came with the blood, he found God waiting to be gracious. Was God gracious because the High Priest confessed everyone’s sin? No! God’s graciousness flowed because the demands of His justice had been met by the blood of a substitute. Because of the blood, there never was a flash of angry lightning there. Because of the blood, there never was one faint rumble of wrathful thunder there. Because of the blood, God looked and seemed to say, “I am well pleased with the blood of this substitute because it points towards the blood of my Son. Because of My Son, I will spare sinners.”

Not only did God gaze upon the blood, but the High Priest, as representative of the people, also fixed his eye on the same blood that lay on the mercy-seat. As he stood gazing on the blood, it was as if he said, “Lord, there is my death and the people’s death for each sin; there is my wrath offering; there is your law’s demand.”

And this is the position of all believers. Our eye is on Jesus, the Christ who was crucified. Our hearts believe that because of the blood, God has given us eternal life (1 John 5:11). Because of the blood, our mouths boldly confess, “Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone that believes” (Romans 10:4). In other words, the believer is free from having to present His strenuous efforts at law-keeping as the method of gaining favour with God. The law, as a means of saving righteousness, is now obsolete. There is no peace, therefore, available to the man who tries to establish his righteousness other than by the doing, dying and rising again of Christ.

I hear the words of love,

I gaze upon the blood,

I see the mighty sacrifice,

And I have peace with God.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

Happy New Year 2016!

January 1, 2016 1 comment

Reformed on the Web would like to wish everyone a Happy New Year 2016!

I will leave you with Spurgeon as you think about what this year might bring to the Glory of God:

 

 

THE Philippians had several times sent presents to Paul, to supply his necessities. Though they were not themselves rich, yet they made a contribution, and sent Epaphroditus with it, “an odour of sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable, well pleasing to God.” Paul felt very grateful: he thanked God, but he did not forget also to thank the donors; he wished them, every blessing, and he did as good as say, “You have supplied my need, and my God shall supply yours. You have supplied my need of temporal food and raiment out of your poverty; my God shall supply all your need out of his riches in glory.” “As,” he says, in the eighteenth verse, “I have all and abound: I am full,” “so,” he adds, “‘my God shall supply all your need.’ You have sent what you gave me by the hand of a beloved brother, but God will send a better messenger to you, for he will supply all your need ‘by Christ Jesus.’“ Every single word sounds as if he had thought it over, and the Spirit of God had guided him in his meditation, so that he should to the fullest extent wish them back a blessing similar to that which they had sent to him, only of a richer and more enduring kind.

Now, on this New Year’s Day I would desire, somewhat in the spirit of Paul, to bless those of you who have supplied, according to your abilities, the wants of God’s work in my hands, and have given, even out of your poverty, to the cause of God, according as there has been need. I count myself to be personally your debtor though your gifts have been for the students, and the orphans, and the colporteurs, and not for myself. In return for your kindness, after the manner of his gracious love, “my God shall supply all your need, according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.”

This verse is particularly sweet to me, for, when we were building the Orphanage, I foresaw that, if we had no voting, and no collecting of annual subscriptions, but depended upon the goodness of God, and the voluntary offerings of his people, we should have times of trial, and therefore I ordered the masons to place upon the first columns of the Orphanage entrance, these words, “My God shall supply all your need, according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” The text therefore is out in stone upon the right hand and upon the left of the great archway. There stands this declaration of our confidence in God; and is long as God lives, we shall never need be remove it, for he will certainly supply the needs of his own work. While we serve him, he will furnish our tables for us.

Charles H. Spurgeon- A New Years Wish- A Sermon published on Thursday, January 5th, 1911

The Gospel as Taught by Calvin

February 18, 2014 3 comments

GospelTaughtByCalvinby R. C. Reed

Book Description

The book you hold in your hands is a rare gem. It was written to help Christians come to a clearer understanding of and appreciation for ‘the gospel of the grace of God’. Its author, drawing on the legacy of John Calvin, takes up and answers the following important questions:

 

What are the origins of Calvinism and Arminianism?

What effect had Adam’s fall upon human nature?

Is God’s grace in the conversion of a sinner invincible?

Who makes the first choice in salvation- Christ or the sinner?

Is the atonement limited in its design and scope?

Is it true that ‘once in grace always in grace’?

How does Calvinism square with the love of God?

Do the fruits of Calvinism show it to be biblical?

 

This book can be purchased from Amazon.com or directly from Banner of Truth

Question 33-Puritan Catechism

August 22, 2013 4 comments

CharlesSpurgeonQ. What is adoption?

A. Adoption is an act of God’s free grace, (1 John 3:1) whereby we are received into the number, and have a right to all the privileges of the sons of God. (John 1:12; Romans 8:17)

Charles Haddon Spurgeon-A Puritan Catechism

Thinking about God’s Graciousness

January 23, 2012 3 comments

As I sit here and think about what I have in Christ, I rejoice. God has forgiven my sins, clothed me with Christ righteousness, and seated me in the heavens in Christ. I was a beggar, a poor wretch, who needed saving. Why did the God of all grace reach down and decide to save this wretch? I do not mean to exalt my wretchedness above God’s grace. O but no that is not my intent. Yet I can look over my life and see that I was not worthy for the God of all grace to save.

Nevertheless this is what glorifies God. This is what exalts him as the Supreme Being of this universe. He is the only one who can take a filthy vessel and make it white as snow. He is the only and true Potter that can make a broken vessel over again. If it were not for his great mercy, where would I be? Better yet, if it were not for his great mercy, where would any of us be? All that have received his grace knows the answer to this. Hell would be our abode for eternity.

Therefore I want too say with the Psalmist this morning,

“So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.” Psalms 90:12

 To many times we get caught up with the things of this life and forget that we need to seek God. We forget the great gifts he has given us and forget to be thankful and to apply our hearts to wisdom. Therefore let us apply our hearts to wisdom, so that we may have an abundant entrance into God’s presence.

This is my hearts desire as I go into this New Year with my upgraded means of communicating the Gospel. I pray that it is your desire as well.

God bless,

Hershel Lee Harvell Jr.