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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 126

TO REV. A. A. REES

WESTWOOD, May 17, 1880.

DEAR FRIEND,—

You shall have the Treasury as a present from me, and I shall count it only a very small token of my love to you. I think you will find good store in it of others’ thoughts, and mine may make the parsley on the dish.

May our Lord ever bless you.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 125

TO REV. A. A. REES

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Jan. 17, [1877].

DEAR FRIEND, —

I think that at the time I spoke the rebuke was deserved, but I never meant to impute neglect of the poor to the voluntary principle, but rather to the form of government which produces the isolation of the churches, and their absolute independency. The Presbyterian and Wesleyan form of polity axe well adapted to reach the poorest localities and we can give abundant evidences to show that in Scotland by the Free Church and United Presbyterians the power of voluntary aid among the poor is abundantly illustrated, and in England all along by the Primitive Methodists.

Please to note that since 1861 which is 15 or 16 years ago there have been remarkable changes, — churches have been removed from London into the suburbs, and on the other hand many noble missions of a purely voluntary character have arisen and have been successfully worked, as I hoped they would be when I spoke so severely.

If your antagonist has no better argument than this very stale one, his cause is nigh unto death.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 124

TO REV. A. A. REES

NIGHTINGALE LANE, May 7’

DEAR FRIEND, —

I wrote to Mr. N___ I am, like yourself, more and more grieved to see the worldliness of professors. I have sharp work with it in the church.

I have invited Messrs. M. & S. to the Tabernacle, but they say that if my preaching does not suffice neither will men be converted though one rose from the dead. They axe as humble as they are useful. I rejoice in them greatly. May you succeed in getting them to Sunderland.

I wish I could read all your note, but I cannot and therefore if I do not answer pray excuse me. I spell and spell but you axe such an awful aristocrat that I cannot make out your hieroglyphics.

Anyhow I love you.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 123

TO REV. A. A. REES

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Jan. 8.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Your letter is quite to my mind. The Lord reigneth. I feel low and weak and I am going away. Your paper was thankfully received, but the Australian letter took up all the space. Its early insertion will occur.

Dear Brother, the Lord smile upon thee ever, and never permit thee to feel my glooms, which yet never cover all the sky.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 122

TO REV. A. A. REES

CLAPHAM, April 14.

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

Thanks for check £2 10s. and thanks also for your good word. Oh! For divine keeping evermore, for it is as you say — one turning aside, and a life-long testimony is marred. Yet it shall not be so seeing we abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 121

TO REV. A. A. REES

CLAPHAM, 10/9.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Thanks! It should have been hearts. I am always much obliged for these hints.

Yours with much esteem,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 120

TO REV. A. A. REES

NEWINGTON, S.E., June 26, 1869.

DEAR FRIEND,—

In brief reply.

(1) Is a case of zeal overdoing its work. I don’t see how I can prevent it.

(2) I wish I did know some one with whom to advise a change. O____

would have been a fit man, but he is gone to his rest.

(3) H___ supplied for me once before and was capital. This time, probably his last, he was flat, stale and unprofitable I hear — but he is a good fellow and capable of good things. Why did not the Bishop of Sunderland let me know he would be in town, and I should have been, and others too, charmed to have his aid.

Your friend L____ has refused to dismiss to such a wretch as I am, and yet I don’t wear a hatband or shut up the Tabernacle. Dear soul, has he dyspepsia?

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.