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Posts Tagged ‘grace’

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 223

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [One of his most earnest helpers].

WESTWOOD, June 24, 1884.

DEAR ____,

I was truly sorry to hear of your illness, but Elijah must faint if he runs before the chariot, and who is to prevent his running? I don’t wonder at your excitement, or blame you, but I do feel sad that it should lead to such illness, and place you in such great danger. You are a splendid engine, but you will burst up if you are worked at such high pressure. The most of our people need the fire to be poked, and very rarely do we need to be damped down; but you, dear____, are not so strong as you look to be, and must be careful.

Anyhow, we will rejoice together. The Lord hath done great things for us; whereof we are glad. Peace be unto you. The sycamore fig was bruised before it became sweet. The bruising has been done with heavy hand; but the sweetness is evidently coming. The Lord bless both you and dear ____ I am deeply grateful to you both for the generous present sent to me, which is the most personal gift I have received. I fear it rejoices a weakness, but it is certainly all my own.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 222

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [A valued Christian worker].

MENTONE. [Undated].

DEAR ______

I felt grieved to note how ill you seem to be, only kept up by your indomitable spirit. I am afraid you may undertake too much, and break down yet further under the strain. Better serve the Lord with five talents than kill yourself with trying to make them seven.

Mr.___ must have preached well, if I may judge his sermon by your extract. We have a nice company of some twenty-four to prayer each morning. The weather is perfect. Only Mr. and Mrs. — are with me.

May heaven’s own smile light up house and heart for you while the husband is away. Salem.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 221

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [An Elder].

MENTONE, December 21, 1877.

Dear ____,

This is a Sabbath with us, but not a Sunday. It is grey and windy, and I am not able to go out. Yet I am much better, although my middle finger is only middling, and will not let the gout go out.

The small punning which appears above is solely due to your letter. I am not in the habit of committing puns, but there is a contagion about persons who have the evil in its very worst form …. I desire you to tender my kindest love to each one of the elders …. I thank those who pray for me. In my pain and weakness I have had great need of your prayers, and now that I am getting well I feel it even more.

Oh, for a great blessing! I open my mouth wide, and there is the promise, “I will fill it.”

The weather is unsettled here, and cold for this place. The logs of olive blaze cheerfully, and are a necessity.

Remember me to _____. Peace be unto you f I cannot write more — the finger forbids.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 220

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [The Deacons, Metropolitan Tabernacle].

MENTONE, 1892.

BELOVED BRETHREN IN CHRIST, —

I know not how to express the wondering gratitude which continues to fill my mind and heart. That the Lord our God should hear the importunate prayers of His whole Church delights me, but does not surprise me. But that the Church should favor me with such a hearty and spontaneous outburst of loving solicitude, altogether amazes me. I am as one spared from the grave henceforth a double debtor to the people of God; and I can only acknowledge the debt, and seek to increase it by asking still to be remembered in prayer.

My recovery so far has been most remarkable. The cessation of the waste caused by the disease is very, very gradual; but as the case is altogether special, I expect, in answer to prayer, to receive a fuller cure than has been known aforetime. I desire this that I may, according to your desire, return to my public service, bearing witness for truth, wooing the souls that stray, and feeding the faithful of the flock.

I pray that to you, my brethren, the Lord may send a gracious recompense for your careful sympathy with me. From my inmost soul I thank you. Peace and prosperity be with all the churches of our Lord Jesus of every name and nation! May loving union prevail over all divergences of judgment, and may HE come, Who will be the consummation of our hopes!

Yours with hearty gratitude,

C. H. SPURGEON.

The Wednesday Word: SAVED

“Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved”(Acts 4:12).

SAVED! What a great Bible term. Some people say it is antiquated, but I disagree. It means deliverance instead of destruction, life instead of death, acquittal instead of punishment and rescue instead of ruin. Saved! What a wonderful multi-faceted word! May we never drop it from our vocabulary.

We are saved!

And how did we get saved? We got saved on the basis of Christ’s finished work outside of us in history (1 Corinthians 15:1-4).

Believers have been delivered from damnation (Romans 5:1). We are saved.

Believers are no longer under wrath (Romans 5:9)…..we are saved.

Jesus said, ¨I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and find pasture¨ (John 10:9).

Again, In Acts 2:21 we learn that “whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

‘But surely I am saved by giving up my bad habits?’ Not at all! As Harry Ironside said, “The Gospel is not a demand that you give up the world, that you give up your sins, that you break off bad habits and try to cultivate good ones. You may do all these things, and yet never believe the Gospel and consequently never be saved at all.”

Inspite of our unworthiness, we, by faith, receive a complete and finished salvation. We are not half condemned, we are saved. We are not half accepted, we are saved.

Because of the doing, dying and rising again of Christ Jesus we are saved completely (Colossians 2:10).

We are saved forever, (Romans 11:29).

And, we are saved for his glory (Romans 15:7).

Notice how our salvation begins with grace and ends with glory. Grace is the forerunner of Glory. Glory is the consummation of grace.

Across the history of the believer’s life is now written in large bold letters ..SAVED. The more we understand the Gospel the more we realise that the Father cannot discover any state to ‘unfit’ us for Jesus. (see Romans 8:33-39). We are saved!

It’s a wonderful thing to know that the Lord Jesus has nothing against us. We are saved! We are saved because Christ Jesus suffered on the cross. He was charged with our sin and He acknowledged our sin to be his. We are saved! In His life, He gave himself for us. At the cross, He gave Himself for us. We are saved!

What sin can keep the believer out of Glory?

Would you say blasphemy? No it can’t be blasphemy for Saul of Tarsus said, “I was a blasphemer”(1 Timothy 1:13). Yet, God saved him.

Would adultery keep a person out of Glory? That can’t be so. Rahab the harlot had practiced prostitution (Joshua 2:1). Yet God saved her.

Would you say murder would keep a person out of glory? Well, David had a hit man go and kill Uriah; that’s murder. (2 Samuel 12). Yet God saved him.

Would you say divorce would keep you out of Glory? The woman at the well was married five times (John 4:16-18). But God saved her.

We have too small a view of the Lord’s power, grace and mercy. He is the Saviour! We are the saved.

As you remember, the name Jesus comes from the Hebrew ‘Jehoshua’, meaning “Jehovah saves”. Jesus was born as our Saviour. If he loses us, he’s not the saviour who was born to save. But He died on the cross as our saviour. He was buried and rose again as our Saviour! Therefore, we are safe and we are saved!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com  

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 219

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [The Church Officers, Metropolitan Tabernacle].

MENTONE, Jan. 12, ‘91.

MY BELOVED BRETHREN,—

Another death among us, and so soon! It is a loud voice to us all to stand ready.

I greatly wish I had been at home, for Mr. Carr was an old comrade and perhaps better known and valued by me than by anyone else, — since he served me in many private literary ways. He was true as steel to the old faith, and to me as an advocate of it. He was eccentric in manner, but in doctrine he kept to the form of sound words with great firmness. I am sure you will, in my absence, do all that the severe weather allows to make the family and the world see how we respect an ancient comrade, and a brother-officer. Some letter of sympathy would come well from you as a body of deacons and elders; but this you will have thought of apart from my suggestion.

Also pray for Mrs. Carr, with that large family, and so many of them young men and boys. What a charge for her! The Lord bless them!

Hearing of the continued badness of the weather, I accepted the advice telegraphed by deacons, and supported by letters from many valued friends, and I will remain here another week, — not idle, but storing powder and shot for the fight.

Brethren, you know I love you, and I know the same of you.

Yours in Christ Jesus,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 218

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

To [Mrs. Bartlett’s Class].

MENTONE, Saturday evening. [Undated.]

BELOVED FRIENDS, —

I write to salute you all, and especially your beloved mother in the gospel, my dear friend, Mrs. Bartlett. I hope you are enjoying times of power such as have been so usual with the class. The Lord’s own daughters among you— each one a princess, not in her own right, but by marriage to King Jesus,— are, I trust, living in the enjoyment of their high privileges.

Why should the children of a King

Go mourning all their days?”

Yours it is to wear a girdle of joy; “For the joy of the Lord is your strength.” See to it that your lives are consistent with your high callings, for it ill becomes the daughters of Zion to demean themselves like the children of earth. “Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ.” Be watchful for the souls of others, and support by your prayers the earnest efforts of your beloved leader, Mrs. Bartlett.

For those of you who are unsaved, I have this word, — “How long halt ye between two opinions?” Years roll on; and each one spent in alienation from God swells your dreadful account. Have you not sinned enough? Have you not run risks enough, that you must still imperil your souls? An hour even of the toothache is too much; but what is that compared with the disease of sin and the anger of God? Yet these you bear as if they were mere trifles. Will the time of decision never come? Or will you linger till you perish in your sin? “Remember Lot’s wife.” She is a monument of salt; take a little of that salt, and season your thoughts with it. Your graves are yawning for you, hell also enlargeth itself. Flee from the wrath to come; start up, like those who have been asleep upon the brink of death; and “strive to enter in at the strait gate.”

Yours lovingly, for Christ’s sake,

C. H. SPURGEON.