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Atheism is foolishness and leaves the world to chance

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015Stubbornness the companion of impiety.

2. The expression of David, (Psalm 14:1, 53:1,) “The fool has said in his heart, There is no God,” is primarily applied to those who, as will shortly farther appear, stifle the light of nature, and intentionally stupefy themselves. We see many, after they have become hardened in a daring course of sin, madly banishing all remembrance of God, though spontaneously suggested to them from within, by natural sense. To show how detestable this madness is, the Psalmist introduces them as distinctly denying that there is a God, because although they do not disown his essence, they rob him of his justice and providence, and represent him as sitting idly in heaven. Nothing being less accordant with the nature of God than to cast off the government of the world, leaving it to chance, and so to wink at the crimes of men that they may wanton with impunity in evil courses; it follows, that every man who indulges in security, after extinguishing all fear of divine judgment, virtually denies that there is a God. As a just punishment of the wicked, after they have closed their own eyes, God makes their hearts dull and heavy, and hence, seeing, they see not. David, indeed, is the best interpreter of his own meaning, when he says elsewhere, the wicked has “no fear of God before his eyes,” (Psalm 36:1;) and, again, “He has said in his heart, God has forgotten; he hideth his face; he will never see it.” Thus although they are forced to acknowledge that there is some God, they, however, rob him of his glory by denying his power. For, as Paul declares, “If we believe not, he abideth faithful, he cannot deny himself,” (2 Timothy 2:13; so those who feign to themselves a dead and dumb idol, are truly said to deny God. It is, moreover, to be observed, that though they struggle with their own convictions, and would fain not only banish God from their minds, but from heaven also, their stupefaction is never so complete as to secure them from being occasionally dragged before the divine tribunal. Still, as no fear restrains them from rushing violently in the face of God, so long as they are hurried on by that blind impulse, it cannot be denied that their prevailing state of mind in regard to him is brutish oblivion.

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 4-Henry Beveridge Translation

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Those who opposed the Reformers claimed knowledge, but were ignorant of the things of God

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-00152. It is owing to the same ignorance that they hold it to be doubtful and uncertain; for this is the very thing of which the Lord complains by his prophets “The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master’s crib; but Israel does not know, my people does not consider,” (Isaiah 1:3.) But however they may sport with its uncertainty, had they to seal their own doctrine with their blood, and at the expense of life, it would be seen what value they put upon it. Very different is our confidence — a confidence which is not appalled by the terrors of death, and therefore not even by the judgment-seat of God.

John Calvin-Prefatory Address to Francis King of the French-Institutes of the Christian Religion

Chapter IV : Of Creation

1. In the beginning it pleased God the Father, (a) Son, and Holy Spirit, for the manifestation of the glory of (b) his eternal power, wisdom, and goodness, to Create or make the world, and all things therein, (c) whether visible or invisible, in the space of six days, and all very good.

a  John 1.2,3. Heb. 1.2. Job 26.13

b Rom.1.20.

c Col.1.16. Gen 2.1,2.

2. After God had made all other Creatures, he Created (d) man, male and female, with (e) reasonable and immortal souls, rendring them fit unto that life to God; for which they were Created; being (f) made after the image of God, in knowledge, righteousness, and true holyness; having the Law of God (g) written in their hearts, and power to fulfill it; and yet under a possibility of transgressing, being left to the liberty of their own will, which was (h) subject to change.

d Gen. 1.27.

e Gen. 2.7.

f Eccles. 7.29. Gen. 1.26.

g Rom.2.14,15.

h Gen. 3.6.

3. Besides the Law written in their hearts, they received (i) a command not to eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil; which whilst they kept, they were happy in their Communion with God, and had dominion (k) over the Creatures.

i Gen. 6.17. & ch. 3.8,9,10.

k Gen. 1.26,28.

 

The 1677/89 London Baptist Confession

Concerning our Sloppy Prayers

God tolerates even our stammering, and pardons our ignorance whenever something inadvertently escapes us — as, indeed, without this mercy there would be no freedom to pray.

John Calvin 1509-1564