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Posts Tagged ‘Justified by Faith Alone’

The Empty Hand of Faith – Vintage

“Now to the one who works, his wage is not credited as a favor, but as what is due. But to the one who does not work, but believes in Him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is credited as righteousness . . . For this reason it is by faith, in order that it may be in accordance with grace, so that the promise will be guaranteed to all the descendants.”

—Romans 4:4-5, 16

“That I may be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own derived from law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which comes from God on the basis of faith.”

—Philippians 3:9

“Faith is chosen by God to be the receiver of salvation, because it does not pretend to create salvation, nor to help in it, but it is content humbly to receive it. Faith is the tongue that begs pardon, the hand which receives it, and the eye which sees it; but it is not the price which buys it. Faith never makes herself her own plea, she rests all her argument upon the blood of Christ. She becomes a good servant to bring the riches of the Lord Jesus to the soul, because she acknowledges whence she drew them, and owns that grace alone entrusted her with them.”

—Charles Spurgeon, All of Grace

The single most amazing truth about the Gospel of Jesus Christ is this: it is all of grace. It is the work of God, not of man. It is the story of a powerful Savior who redeems His people, and He does so completely. It is about a sovereign God, a perfect Savior, and an accomplished redemption.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The Wednesday Word: Gospel Forgiveness

December 9, 2015 1 comment

Since the believer’s sins have been punished on Christ, we can say with assurance that we are saved. Believers are simply this ….forgiven sinners!

But what kinds of sins was Jesus punished for?

Was it for our big sins?

Yes!

What about our little sins?

Yes!

And, what about the sins of omission?

Yes, for those too!

We are forgiven because Christ Jesus was punished in our place and in our stead.

The gospel truth is this, believers are covered with the righteousness of Christ. We are in Christ! We are reckoned not to have done the sins we actually have done. This is beautiful, matchless grace! I hope we never get tired of hearing this good news.

The Bible teaches that there are two kinds of righteousness. The first is the righteousness by which the uninstructed and ignorant attempt to get to heaven. The Bible, however, is ruthlessly scathing in describing this kind of righteousness. It calls it “filthy rags” (Isaiah 64:6). The second kind of righteousness is the imputed righteousness God gives us as a free gift … the very righteousness of Christ.

Unfortunately, if we are not bathed in the gospel, we continually revert to believing that there is something we can do to get right with God. We are like the Jews of whom Paul wrote, “They are zealous for God, but their zeal is not based on knowledge. For they being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone that believes. (Romans 10:2-4).

So consider this, by grace, the Lord chose and accepted us. We are not saved by anything we do! Salvation is by grace alone. Don’t let anyone rob you of that precious truth.

As Dr David Dykes says, “If you could burn one single calorie of effort to bring about your salvation, then you could take a tiny part of the credit and boast about your part.” Excellent statement! … But he understates the matter…in actuality, we would take all the credit! The gospel truth is this, salvation is all of God and none of us. Charles Spurgeon expressed it this way: “If there is one stitch in the celestial garment of our righteousness which we are to insert ourselves, then we are lost.”

To further grasp this matter of being saved by someone else, we read in Colossians 2:14 that Christ has blotted out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross.

Some have reasoned that the handwriting of ordinances alludes to the custom of affixing to the cross the charges which earned the criminal the death sentence. Remember how, at our Lord’s crucifixion, the charge read, “This is Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews.” That had been His claim. He was the King, the heavenly King, who would rule the earth. To the Jews, this was blasphemy. To the Romans, it stood for insurrection.

Others reason that by the ‘handwriting of ordinances’ is meant that God took the obligations of Mosaic Law and nailed them to the cross of Christ. By His saving work, the Lord Jesus exposed all systems of works salvation as being fraudulent.

Christ died as a substitute for the people of God. So beware of these grace robbers who tell you that you have something to do to earn heaven.

We are saved by grace alone…we make no contribution.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

Abounding Grace Part 3

Grace is threefold: It is for the past, present and future. We see this threefold grace demonstrating itself in the Incarnation … one of the supremely important truths of the gospel. At the Incarnation, God became a man and was thus able, as a man, to die. The writer to the Hebrews puts it this way,

Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; (Hebrews 2:14).

In other words, the death of the cross could not have happened if Jesus Christ had not assumed human nature. That’s grace for the past! But in the Incarnation, we are also instructed about grace for the present. At this very moment, we have a great, merciful and faithful high priest in Heaven. He is one of us. He is appearing even now for us before the presence of God. As He appears, He continually supplies His perfection to our constant imperfection. That’s grace for the present!

Listen to these grace-filled words,

“We do not have a high priest who cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities (our weaknesses) but (one who) was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15).

The man who is God, is the God who became man. His incarnation not only gives us grace for the past and present but also pledges us grace for the future. He is coming back for us as the reigning rightful King of the Earth and the cosmos.

In 1 Timothy 1:1, we discover that Christ Himself is our future hope. We read, “Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Saviour, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope; Grace is abounding towards us. Consider this scripture; “Of his fullness have we all received, and grace for grace” John 1:16.

In Christ, grace is replaced by even more grace. That’s the heritage of every believer. But, what do we do when the grace runs out? The answer is nothing. Why? Because grace never runs out! In this New Covenant, we have grace following grace, following grace, following grace. It’s like standing on the seashore and watching wave after wave coming in one after the other. When one wave crashes, another is on the way. We don’t make this happen, we are not called upon to contribute anything to the scene. So it is with grace. It is never ending in its supply to us.

Colossians 2:9 says, “In him (Christ) dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily.” Fullness is the Greek word ‘Pleroma’ which means, among other things, ‘complete totality.’ It is stunning to grasp that the complete totality of the Godhead dwells bodily in the Lord Jesus Christ. Compare this with what is taught in John 1:16; “For of his fullness (Pleroma) have all we received.” This means that we, therefore, have limitless resources in the Lord Jesus Christ. In Christ, grace is abounding to us.

Celsus, a Greek philosopher of the 2nd century, used to jeer at Christ. He didn’t deny Christ’s historical existence but, rather, said that Jesus was both illegitimate and a sorcerer. According to Celsus, every reputable teacher typically attracted the noble and wise people of his day, but Jesus attracted the down and outs and the scum of society.

Yes, that part is correct. Thank God it’s true. Christ Jesus demonstrates His grace by the kind of people he chooses. But, although we are morally down and out, He does not leave us like that. He clothes us with His righteousness. He saves us by grace and makes us Heavenly royalty. When He returns, we shall be like Him for we shall see Him as He is. That’s grace! Salvation is all of grace! Abounding Grace,

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Gospel for Roman Catholics

Recently there has been a surge in prominent Evangelicals calling for unity with Roman Catholicism. In one sense there seems to be strong foundational similarities that would justify these calls to unity. Catholics are baptized in the name of the Trinity. God’s revealed word in the Bible — setting aside their addition of the Apocryphal books, for argument’s sake — is foundational to their worldview. Catholics love Christ and believe that he died on the cross and rose again to provide grace for sinners.

Obviously there are theological differences associated with the specific teachings of each one of these perceived similarities, and I do not want to minimize the importance of these differences. But for argument‘s sake, at least on the surface, there is some common ground.

There is also a strong agreement in ethical standards. Both Roman Catholics and Evangelicals ground morality on God’s holy nature as revealed in the law of God. This means that on the hot button moral issues of the day; the murder of the unborn, human sexuality, the sanctity of marriage there is solidarity between Roman Catholic and Evangelical ethics because they are coming from the same source. Again, this seems to justify a call to some sense of unity.

Are these good enough reasons to publically stump for visible unity with Roman Catholics? That question is beyond the scope of this post. But there is a more fundamental question that must be answered first. That question serves as the dividing line between followers of Christ and the world, which separates biblical Christianity from every other worldview; does Rome possess and preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ?

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Imputed Righteousness without Works

This article is a little lengthy, but if someone really wanted to understand this doctrine of imputed righteousness, then he will take the time to read this.

I leave you with this article:

The Doctrine of Imputed Righteousness without Works Asserted and Proved by John Gill

This Epistle is written on purpose to state, explain, and vindicate, the doctrine of a sinner’s justification before God, by the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ. In order to which, the Apostle takes up his two first chapters, and part of the third, in proving, that both Jews and Gentiles are under sin, that they have by sinning broke the law of God, and so are become liable to its curses and condemnation, and therefore cannot be justified in the sight of God, by their obedience to it; and then strongly and justly concludes, that a man is justified by faith, in the imputed righteousness of Christ, without the deeds of the law. This doctrine he confirms in the beginning of this chapter, by instances of two of the greatest men, for religion and godliness, that ever were in the Jewish nation. The one is Abraham, who was the friend of God, and the father of the faithful, and yet he was not justified before God by his works; for what saith the Scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness, in verse 3. The other is David, a man after God’s own heart, raised up by the Lord to fulfill all his will. Who yet was so far from trusting to, or depending upon his own righteousness, for justification, that he wholly places the happiness of men, and so unquestionably his own, in a righteousness imputed to him by God, without works, as in the words I have read unto you. In speaking to which, I shall,

To read the rest of this article click here.