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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 209

February 21, 2019 Leave a comment

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Rev. A. S. Patton].

LONDON, March 26, 1884.

DEAR SIR, —

I do not know who “the sainted gentleman” may be, but he did not speak the truth if he reported me as saying that I hated a close-communion Baptist as I hate the devil. I never even thought of such a thing, and assuredly it is not and never was true of me. The “saint” must have dreamed it, or have mistaken the person.

The most unaccountable statements are made by men of known integrity, and they can only be accounted for by misunder-standing or forgetfulness. I know my own mind and views, and I can say, without reserve, that the expression could not have been used by me. As compared with the bulk of English Baptists, I am a strict-communionist myself, as my churchfellowship is strictly of the baptized.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 208

February 14, 2019 Leave a comment

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Prof. W. S. Aldis].

WESTWOOD, Oct. 18, 1882.

DEAR SIR,—

My son was weak in the lungs, but the climate of Auckland has quite set him up. I should think it is the place for an invalid; at any rate, it is the place for him.

My knowledge is slender, but all encouraging.

Your letter asking for an interview on Saturday did not reach here till Monday, or I would gladly have seen you.

May you be guided; and I think the oracle will say “Go.”

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 207

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, June 30, 1877.

DEAR FRIENDS,—

We are both bound to be in Scotland upon the joyful occasion of Aug. I, but we are grateful for your kindness in asking us, and we wish for the bride and bridegroom a mint of blessings, and for the friends on both sides the favor of the Lord.

We shall hope to remember the happy couple at the time, though we hope to be among the Islands of the Northern Sea.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 206

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Rev. Newman Hall, LL.B.].

WESTWOOD, July 4, 1888

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

I have only just heard that to-day is your anniversary. I congratulate you, and I pray that you may have a right good day. If I had been well enough, I would have accepted your invitation, you may be quite sure. I thank you and your friends for many kindnesses received by way of help in my hour of sickness. The Lord bless you who preached, and the people who spared you! In these days, we are two of the old school. Our experience has taught us that, both for conversion and edification, the doctrine of Christ crucified is all sufficient. A childlike faith in the atoning sacrifice is the foundation for the purest and noblest of characters. As the hammer comes down on the anvil ever with the same ring, so will we preach Christ, Christ, CHRIST, and nothing else but Christ.

Our friends leave us for the suburbs, but I trust the Lord will raise up around us another generation of faithful men. God bless those attached brethren who stick to us, and bear the brunt of the battle with us! I feel a deep gratitude to all such, both at the Tabernacle and at Christ Church. To you I desire continued health and joyous communion with God.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 205

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Rev. Newman Hall, LL.B.].

MENTONE, Jan. 20.

BELOVED BROTHER, —

Your love allows brevity. Thank you. I am arising from stupor to pain, from pain to intervals of ease, from coughing hard to a weak voice, from writhing to wriggling about in an initial style of walking with a chair for a go-cart. I have had an escape which makes me shudder with gratitude. Here is a man who knocked out his teeth and yet did not cut his flesh, and turned over twice so completely as to put his money into his boots. Something of the comic attends solemnity when I am in the midst of it. I have not lost a grain of peace or even of joy, yet I pity a dog that has felt so much in all his four legs as I have had in one. All is well. I shall be home soon.

Yours most lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 204

January 17, 2019 2 comments

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Saturday Evening

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

Can your course of lectures commence with the second week of the New Year and last through six Fridays from three to four? This would carry my men over my absence, and be, you scarcely can tell how great, a relief to me. I am in some trouble, which I carry to my Lord, but I want human help and sympathy. Mr.____ grows old, and we begin to feel it; I want more help; if God moves you to render it, it will be a boon indeed. I am in my very soul heart to heart with you, and I think we grow towards one another. I could trust you as I could not everyone, or scarcely one.

Lectures and sermons already in your hand might be made invaluable to me, with less toil to you than benefit to a rising race of ministers. I know you are overworked, and if you feel you cannot do it I will not press, but just now my need is urgent, and your aid will come in as a great boon. You will do it if you can.

I ought to be getting my sermon, but cannot readily settle to it because of cares which toss my brain. Having tried the human side, I shall now cast all my care on the Divine Helper; but I feel as if I had you here sympathizing with me now that I have written you.

Breathe a prayer for me, and believe me ever to be —

Your loving brother,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 203

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

CLAPHAM, February 18, 1865.

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

I owe you very many thanks for the splendid addition your kindness has made to my library. I shall very greatly value the books as coming from yourself in so kind a manner, and for their own sakes too.

Mrs. Spurgeon desires her kindest thanks for your kind remembrance of her. May you have every blessing, abounding in your path, work, home, and person.

Yours very thankfully,

C. H. SPURGEON.