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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 156

February 15, 2018 Leave a comment

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Sept. 9, ‘79.

DEAR FRIENDS, —

The Lord be with you. I like your plans well enough, but the less rule and regulation the better. Thursday nights we shall probably have some other preacher, but all else seems to me right enough.

May Burnley continue to burn with grace.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 155

TO REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS

WESTWOOD, Feb. 28, 1887.

DEAR FRIEND, —

It is proposed that on the Tuesday evening of the Conference, Apr. 19th, we should have meetings with the Orphans, seeking their conversion.

Would you oblige me by addressing the boys? I want Tuesday to be rather a holy day than a mere holiday.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 154

TO REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS

NIGHTINGALE LANE, June 20.

MY DEAR MR. WILLIAMS,—

Will you come over to-morrow afternoon and bring with you to take a cup of tea. I want to see him at once, for both you and Mr. C. think so much of him, though I fear he would never like to do the drudgery work and play second fiddle. I imagine him to be a great swell, fit to play the big bass viol, and! want more of a schoolmaster. I should, however, be glad to see him, and so would Mr.____.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 153

TO REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS

WESTWOOD, April 30, 1881.

DEAR FRIEND, —

You know that my great treat at the close of the Conference week, is to have a dozen brethren down here on Friday evening. Will you make one of them? Train leaves Elephant at 3.36.

Let me know please if you can come or not, so that I may fill up the gap if you cannot manage it.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 152

TO REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS

WESTWOOD, Jan. 21, 1881.

DEAR FRIEND,—

Harrald will be away to-morrow, and I shall be all alone, — not over bright. Can you leave the queen at the Crown, the circle at the Oval, and come and see one who is ill on the hill, and would be glad to see you.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 151

TO REV. W. J. MAYERS

PARIS, Wednesday.

DEAR MR. MAYERS, —

Mr. B___ tells me you have begun right hopefully. May the Lord grant you a good harvest time. I am very grateful to you, and to the other brethren “which were partners with Simon.”

Tell the people I am praying for a great blessing, and especially that those “not far from the kingdom of God” may be brought in. There are some of the most hopeful people in the world in the congregation. God bless them, and save them from being satisfied with blossoming. Fruit unto God, in repentance and faith is what we want at once. I hope the closing meeting will be so fruitful that there will be a demand for more such gatherings. I cannot ask you to come again — but if you and the others will, I shall be greatly the debtor to you all. With much love to you and the brethren Sawday and Stott, and all my elders and officers,

I am,

Ever your hearty friend,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 150

TO REV. W. J. MAYERS

WESTWOOD, Mar. 4, 1882.

DEAR MR. MAYERS, —

Your letter and gift cheer me much. God bless you. I love you heartily in the Lord.

I am of your mind as to the supper, but I know that my leading friends would not be. It will come as surely as Xmas. Christian people will one day be ashamed to have these things at their religious gatherings, but I have had proof of late that it must be growth, not force. I have no wine-glasses in the house, so that all who come here must go without, especially as there is no alcohol on the premises: but I do not feel a right to do the same with others. The wave is rising which will bear away our present customs, and I will not be behind it, but neither do I think it wise to precede it.

The supper costs about £200, but three of us pay for it — so that nothing comes from the fund, except certain incidental repairs, etc.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.