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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 173

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mrs. Higgs].

WESTWOOD, January 6, 1883.

DEAR MRS. HIGGS, —

L____ and G____ have now told me all about our dear one’s death. The Lord has dealt well with him. I wonder how he lived so long to cheer us all: and I feel relieved that he lived no longer, for it would have been great anguish to him. He has gone at the right time. The Lord will be your comfort and help. I meant to go to you this morning, but I found my foot would not let me go up and down steps. It is a double pain to be kept from you and your sorrowing family …. We shall all meet again Let us bless God. Can we?

Your loving friend,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 172

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mr. Thomas H. Olney].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, October, 1875.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I could not say much to Mr. M____, for I felt stunned by the tidings of your brother’s death, and could not realize it; indeed, I cannot now.

God bless you, beloved brother; and as He comes so very near in solemn deeds, may He come just as near in love! Peace be to you in the hour of sore amazement!

I send my deepest sympathies to the bereaved wife. I can do no better than pray that she may now be very graciously sustained. If she can calmly bow before the Lord, it will be for her own good. Grief so natural, and so likely to prove excessive, must be restrained for the sake of herself and babes.

God help her, poor soul! What a loss is hers!

Yours lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 171

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spurgeon].

WESTWOOD, Sept. 11, 1890.

MY DEAR CHILDREN,—

The Lord Himself comfort you. I want comforting myself. To think of that dear little creature being taken away! It must be right! It must be goody Our Father is never mistaken nor unkind.

You are acting wisely in not bringing the little one from the place. You will be setting an example of common sense which is greatly needed in an age which is so sentimental as it is false-hearted.

If you would like a wreath from me, kindly order it in Herne Bay, and send the bill to me. I would try to send one, but if you are not going to have any, I should be setting an ill example.

I feel sure you will both find a secret strength poured into your souls, and in this also faith shall have the victory.

I shall never forget the day. For a wonder your dear mother went with me to the Orphanage, and was very happy. We came home, and the telegram came at once, — just the bitter herbs with the feast.

To you it must be a sharp cut; but our Lord has an almighty salve.

Your loving father,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 170

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, Nov. 8, 1890.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Hearty thanks for notes better than those of the Bank. I shall try to issue notes on Genesis like your notes. Any on the first six chapters greatly valued.

My head! My head!

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 169

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, Oct. 17, 1890.

DEAR FRIEND,—

The Lord be with you! My grievous trial in the striking down of W. Olney makes me ask your loving sympathy. What shall I do? The Lord will be with me.

I am grateful for your papers for S. & T., which I will use by degrees. Narratives are the scarcest and most useful sort of articles.

May you have a grand time at Tabernacle when I am away!

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 168

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

MENTONE, Jan. 12, 1889.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I felt sure that the Lord would bless you at the Tabernacle, and now I feel grateful that He has done so. Although the weather was horrible everybody feels that warmth and power were abundant in your testimony. It is to me a joy unspeakable to be associated with a brother so sound in the faith, and so earnest for souls. The blend is one which only a divine hand can make.

May this be the best year we have ever seen! Do not make too many meetings. Yours is killing work: die at great length.

Now that you have no Home Evangel, can you sometimes help me with a narrative for Sword and Trowel? This must be kept up or funds will go down.

I feel very grateful for your circulating All of Grace. I believe the Lord will more and more bless that little book. According to Promise is in the same line, from another point of view.

I have been very ill but I now feel convalescent. I have had say four days’ real holiday: the rest belongs to the head of illness and getting better. No, I had a good week at first.

Kindest regards to Mrs. Fullerton. She remembers the tea-drinking here. The old Hotel de la Paix remains shut up, and is very dilapidated.

I wish you the largest success at Westbourne Grove. I am right glad you are there. I wish to both church and minister the full sunlight of the Lord.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 167

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

MARSEILLES, Wednesday noon, [1888]. We have arrived here happily after travelling all night. I am very frequently thinking of you and the work at the Tabernacle. Send me word to Mentone, where I hope to be to-morrow (Thursday). May some of the lapstones be broken: I have not many, but the few are hard. May some of the rolling stones be fixed in the temple wall. May adamant become flesh. May flint be taken quite away. May the Lord Jesus be to thousands the head-stone of the Corner. Who else should be? Where else would they put HIM?

My love to all my beloved fellow-workers and yourselves.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.