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An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith- Appendix Point 20

20. Though a believer’s right to the use of the Lord’s Supper do immediately flow from Jesus Christ apprehended and received by faith; yet in as much as all things ought to be done not only decently, but also in order; I Cor. 14:40, and the word holds forth this order, that disciples should be baptized, Matt. 28:19, Acts 2:38, and then be taught to observe all things (that is to say, all other things) that Christ commanded the Apostles, Matt. 28:20, and accordingly the Apostles first baptized disciples, and then admitted them to the use of the Supper; Acts 2:41,42, we therefore do not admit any to the use of the Supper, nor communicate with any in the use of this ordinance, but disciples baptized, lest we should have fellowship with them in their doing contrary to order.

Benjamin Cox- An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith

An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith- Appendix Point 18

18. As the preaching of the Gospel, both for the conversion of sinners, and the edifying of those that are converted; so also the right use of baptism, and the Lord’s Supper, ought to be till the end of the world, Matt. 28:19,20; I Cor. 11:26.

Benjamin Cox- An Appendix To A Confession Of Faith

Definitions of Doctrine-Volume 3- Chapter 30- The Lord’s Supper

CHAPTER 30-THE LORD’S SUPPER #Mt 26:26-30 Mr 14:22-26 Lu 22:14-20 #1Co 10:16,17,20,21 11:17-34

The Old Covenant religion was characterized by ceremonies and the priest was the important person. He offered sacrifices for his own sins and then for the sins of the people. These ceremonies were typical and found their fulfillment in Christ. This made them temporary. They passed away with the coming of Christ and the one sacrifice He made.

In the New Covenant religion there are but two ceremonies or ordinances: baptism and the Lord’s Supper. Baptism symbolizes the work of Christ in death and resurrection; and also our legal union with Him in death and resurrection. In Him we are dead to sin and alive unto God. The Lord’s Supper symbolizes our participation of the benefits of Christ’s death and resurrection.

Baptism says that the believer is in Christ; the Lord’s Supper says that Christ is in the believer. These two ordinances gave us a full picture to the eye of the whole gospel. Do not save but give us a picture of what saves.

We will try to answer some pertinent questions concerning the Lord’s Supper.

1. What is it?

2. Why observe it?

3. How should we observe it?

1. WHAT IS THE LORD’S SUPPER?

1. It is a memorial supper. It is to be done in memory of Christ.

2. It is a church ordinance, a church act. The church must act in concert. Christ is one bread or loaf and the church is one body. At Corinth it was observed individually or in groups or parties. One group would come and bring their basket and eat, then another group, and so on. The rich would have a big meal and get drunk; the poor would have nothing and go away hungry. Paul says tarry one for another. Thinking of it as a church ordinance, we might ask, Who is to come to the table? What are the steps to take to get to the table?

2a) Salvation- one must be a believer.

2b) Baptism-all Christians say that baptism must precede the Lord’s Supper.

2c) Church membership.

2d) Self examination.

2. WHY OBSERVE IT?

1. Because Christ commanded it. “And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me” (#1Co 11:24).

2. It is to help us remember His blood shed for us. “And he said unto them, This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many” (#Mr 14:24).

3. HOW SHOULD WE OBSERVE IT?

1. It is to be done worthily. That is, in a worthy manner. Not a question of personal worthiness. It is not to honor ourselves as if we were worthy. He is to be honored as the one altogether worthy.

2. What is the worthy manner of observing it? Answer: There must be the exercise of three faculties: memory, faith, and hope.

2a) Our memory must work. Memory looks back. We are to remember Christ, not father or mother or wife, or any other human being. And we are to remember Christ on the cross dying for our sins. Christ said: “This do in remembrance of me”. We are not to remember Jesus lying in the cradle or Jesus going about doing good. We are to remember Him as He hung on the cross.

2b) Faith must be exercised. What does faith do? It discerns his body. In partaking of the emblems of the body and blood of Christ we are symbolizing our faith. Just as eating is appropriating food for the body; so faith is appropriating the benefits of His shed blood.

2c) Our hope is exercised. “For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come” (#1Co 11:26). In observing the Lord’s Supper we should look back at the cross and look forward to the future when we will have all the benefits of the cross in glorification.

Communion is a misunderstood word. We talk about communing with one another at the Lord’s table. It is not communing with one another but with Christ. We commune with one another only in the sense that we are physically together, but we all participate together as a unit of His blood by means of the symbol. We participate symbolically occasionally while we participate by faith continually.

The Corinthians perverted the Lord’s Supper:

1. By mixing with heathen ceremonies, “Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord’s table, and of the table of devils” (#1Co 10:21).

2. By making it a common meal to satisfy hunger. “For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged” (#1Co 11:31).

3. By failure to discern the Lord’s body. “Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord” (#1Co 11:27).

4. The order and meaning of the Lord’s table. “For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come. Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord’s body. For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep. For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged. But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world. Wherefore, my brethren, when ye come together to eat, tarry one for another. And if any man hunger, let him eat at home; that ye come not together unto condemnation. And the rest will I set in order when I come” (#1Co 11:23-34).

C. D. Cole-Definitions of Doctrine-Volume 3

Thoughts on Baptism, Communion, and Reformation21

by Tom Chantry

I would probably be a happier, healthier Baptist if I just kept my nose out of the ongoing kerfuffle debate over at Reformation21 over the question of closed communion among Baptists. I just wanted to say that right up front so that you would all realize that I recognize the fact.

However, having been critical of some of the Presbyterian brethren there in the past when their treatment of Baptists – and particularly of Reformed Baptists – left just a bit to be desired, and having once written that both sides should “reign in the bullies,” I don’t know that I have a choice. So here are my thoughts in what is so far an unfinished discussion. I’ll try to keep them brief.

Some History

Obviously “Baptists” are those who believe that true baptism is the immersion of those who have professed faith in Christ. Other baptism, whether of infants who can make no profession or by some other mode than immersion, is not regarded as pure baptism in the New Testament sense. That this is what it means to be “Baptist” is scarcely controversial.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

The 1677 Confession on Open vs Closed Communion

The editors of the confession intentionally avoided addressing open and closed communion in order to allow more churches to be able to subscribe to the confession. The majority of its subscribers were advocates of closed communion, but there had been a strand of open-communion going as far back as Henry Jessey and others among the original Particular Baptists of the 1640’s. To accommodate those, and especially Bunyan, the confession is silent here.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Free Ebook- John Spilsbury

February 26, 2016 Leave a comment

GOD’S ORDINANCE,

THE SAINT’S PRIVILEGE

Discovered and Proved in Two Treatises.

The First,

The Saint’s Interest by Christ in all the Privileges of Grace;

Wherein Their Right to the Use of Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper,
Even Now During the Reign of Antichrist, is Cleared;

and

the Objections of Those that Oppose the Same, Are Answered.

The Second,

The Peculiar Interest of the Elect in Christ, and His Saving Grace:
Wherein it is Proved That Christ Has Not Presented To His Father’s
Justice a Satisfaction for the Sins of all men; but only for the sins of
those that do, or shall believe in Him; Which are His Elect Only:

And

The Objections of Those That Maintain the Contrary, are also Answered.

Both Written by John Spilsbery

And the Last Transcribed, and Somewhat Enlarged, by Benjamin Cox.

 

 

Download the book here. (Pdf)

Definitions of Doctrine-Volume 3-Chapter 8-The Lord’s Supper-1 Cor. 11:17-34

February 19, 2016 Leave a comment

CHAPTER 8-THE LORD’S SUPPER -1Co 11:17-34

The old covenant religion of the Old Testament was characterized by ritual or ceremonies and the priest was the important person in worship. He offered sacrifices for his own sins and then for the sins of the people. These ceremonies were typical. They found their end and fulfillment in Christ when He offered one sacrifice never to be repeated. This made them of a temporary nature.

The new covenant religion of the New Testament has only two ceremonies or ordinances: baptism and the Lord’s Supper. These, are not sacraments of saving efficacy, but symbols of what does save. Together they give us a picture of the whole gospel. Paul defines the, gospel as the death, burial, and resurrection of Christ. “For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures” (#1Co 15:3-4). Baptism is a picture or symbol of the burial and resurrection of Christ and the Lord’s Supper sets forth His death. Baptism takes us to the place where Christ was buried and arose again. The Lord’s Supper takes us to Calvary where He died for OUR sins. Baptism tells us what we are in Christ; dead to sin and alive unto God through Christ. As a burial, baptism presupposes the believer to be dead and alive. Baptism is for a dead person.

We have met as a church, to observe the Lord’s Supper. We should be as Scriptural as possible; and to do this, we shall ask three questions:

1. What is it?
2. Why should we observe it?
3. How should we observe it?

1. WHAT IS THE LORD’S SUPPER?

1. It is a memorial service. It is to be observed in memory of Christ. This implies His absence from us. We never hold a service in remembrance of someone who is still in our midst. Christ is present with us in the Holy Spirit, but not in person. While alive, He instituted the Lord’s Supper as a means of remembering Him after He was gone.

2. It is a church ordinance a church act. There is no example of the Lord’s Supper being observed by an individual or in a private home by the family. Christ is one bread or loaf and the church that observes the Lord’s Supper is one body. At Corinth it was observed individually, or, in groups for gratification of appetite and resulted in some being drunk and others hungry. Paul says tarry one for another- wait until all members are present. Do not make a common meal of it.

Thinking of it as a church ordinance, we might ask; Who is to come to the table? Is it for everybody or are there restrictions? In one sense it is for everybody-nobody is barred. But there are certain steps to be taken in coming to the table.

2a) One must be saved. He must come to Christ before coming to His table.

2b) One must be a baptized believer. Baptism is the initial ordinance to be observed only once; Lord’s Supper is the recurring ordinance to be repeated again and again. No differences among denominations on this question.

2c) One must be a church member. The believers at Corinth were members of the church there and as such were told to wait for one another.

2d) There must be self examination. We will consider what this is later on.

2. WHY SHOULD WE OBSERVE IT?

Because Christ commanded it. Why did he command it? As a way of helping us remember His death. Paul said: “ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come.” (#1Co 11:26) The word for “shew” here is translated “preach” 10 times, “declare,” 2 times and “show” 3 times. It is a sort of visual aid-a picture of Christ’s death to the eyes.

As a mother might tell her children to meet at her grave to commemorate her sacrificial toll for them, so Christ bids His people to meet to commemorate His dying love for them.

3. HOW SHOULD WE OBSERVE IT?

We are not left in the dark about how to observe the Supper.

1. It must be observed worthily, that is, in a worthy manner. It is not a question of personal worthiness, or else none could come to the Lord’s table. It is not to honor ourselves as if we were worthy. It is to honor Him, Who is altogether worthy.

2. Now what is the worthy manner of observing it? There must be the exercise of three faculties: memory, faith, and hope.

2a) Memory must work. Memory looks back. We must remember Christ; not father, mother, wife, brother, sister or any other person. We must look back to Christ dying on Calvary. He said, “This do in rememberance of me”
(#1Co 11:24). We must do this to show His death. We are taken to think of Christ as a baby in the manger, or as going about doing good. We are to think of Him as He hung on the cross.

2b) Faith must be exercised. What does faith do? It discerns His body. By faith we commune or participate in His broken body and shed blood. We do not have His actual body and blood, but only the emblems of them and we are symbolizing our faith in His death for our salvation. Just as eating is appropriating food for our body, so faith is an act of appropriating the benefits of His death. We symbolically appropriate or eat the emblems of His body and blood and thus declare our faith in what He did for us at Calvary.

2c) Hope must be exercised. We show His death till He comes. He is absent now. The Romanist insists that the real body and blood of Christ are in the elements, “That by and at the consecration of the elements they are changed into the real body and blood of Christ; and that it is bread and wine only in appearance.” What a travesty of the truth! Paul taught the very opposite. He said, “For as often as ye eat this bread and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come” (#1Co 11:26). Paul says we eat of this bread and drink of this cup, emblems of His body and blood.

Communion is a much misunderstood word. We are talking about communing with one another. It is not communing with one another but with Christ. Dr. Bob: “It is a spiritual participation in the blood of Christ which is symbolized by the cup.” While He is away we show our faith in His death by eating and drinking the elements that represent His body and blood.

C. D. Cole-Definitions of Doctrine-Volume 3