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The Wednesday Word: Speaking Blood

But you are come ….. to Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling, that speaks better things than that of Abel (Hebrews 12:24).

In our text, we have both the blood of Abel and the blood of Jesus. Both men were murdered! Both men presented a sacrifice before the Father. Both sacrifices were accepted but, strictly speaking, Abel’s sacrifice was accepted only because of Christ’s future work at the cross. It was impossible that the blood of Abel’s lamb could, in and of itself, take away his sin. But it did, because the Father accepted it, as it were, by credit, based on the final payment for sins that was yet to be made at Calvary.

Abel’s sacrifice had no merit in it, but Christ’s sacrifice was so overflowing with value that it encompassed Abel’s sacrifice of his lamb. When Abel’s lamb died, the blood was the blood of an everyday lamb. Although it was a far inferior sacrifice to Christ’s sacrifice, it was accepted because it was offered by faith and pointed to Christ.

Christ’s blood, however, was atoning blood, poured out once for the sins of His people from every generation. It was a well pleasing and satisfactory sacrifice which guaranteed that no charge made against us would prosper.

There is, however, a deeper meaning to this verse in that Abel’s own blood, is to be contrasted with that of Christ’s. Abel’s blood was speaking blood. God said to Cain, “What have you done, the voice of your brother’s blood cries unto Me from the ground” (Genesis 4:10). So here we have two men, two sets of blood, two voices. What’s the difference? The difference is this, Abel’s blood called for vengeance and vindication, but Christ’s blood calls for mercy!

Both Abel and Christ were murdered. Abel was killed by his brother and Christ was murdered by his “own” for, “He came to His own, and His own received Him not” (John 1:12). And there at the cross, Jesus bled and died. But listen and listen intensely. Do you hear it? Listen to what? The silence! There is only silence from Christ’s blood on the subject of vengeance. We hear no call for vengeance upon His people. But listen again to what Christ’s blood is saying. It is speaking mercy and salvation to those who believe. Abel’s blood cries out for justice and judgment, but Jesus’ blood declares redemption and acquittal. Christ’s blood makes a much better speech than that of Abel’s.

Spurgeon said it like this,

“You came to the blood with no merits of your own. Guilty, lost, and helpless, you came to take that blood, and that blood alone, as your everlasting hope. You came to the cross of Christ, with a trembling and an aching heart; and oh! what a precious sound it was to you to hear the voice of the blood of Jesus! ….it cries “It is finished; I have made an end of sin; I have brought in everlasting righteousness.”

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

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Salvation is not by our own merit, but is of the Lord alone

October 26, 2015 2 comments

Spurgeon 3Effectively, it all comes of God; and I am sure we must add, meritoriously. We have experienced that salvation is wholly of him. What merits have I? If I were to scrape together all I ever had, and then come to you and beg all you have got, I should not collect the value of a farthing among you all. We have heard of some Catholic, who said that there was a balance struck in his favor between his good works and his bad ones, and therefore he went to heaven. But there is nothing of the sort here; I have seen many people, many kinds of Christians, and many odd Christians, but I never yet met with one who said he had any merits of his own when he came to close quarters. We have heard of perfect men, and we have heard of men perfectly foolish, and we have thought the characters perfectly alike. Have we any merits of our own? I am sure we have not, if we have been taught of God. Once we thought we had; but there came a man called Conviction into our house one night, and took away our gloryings. Ah! we are vile still. I don’t know whether Cowper said quite right, when he said, —

“Since the dear hour that brought me to thy foot
And cut up all my follies by the root
I never trusted in an arm but thine —
Nor hoped but in thy righteousness divine!”

I think he made a mistake, for most Christians get trusting in self at times, but we are forced to own that “salvation is of the Lord,” if we consider it meritoriously.

Charles H. Spurgeon- God Alone the Salvation of His People-A Sermon Delivered On Sabbath

Dwight L. Moody’s Arminian Doctrines Pt 3

April 7, 2014 1 comment

Dr. Kennedy continues in discussing Moody’s preaching:

“True, much use is made of Christ’s substitutionary death. But it is usually referred to as a disposing of sin, so that it no longer endangers him, who believes that Christ died for him—who accepts Christ as his substitute. This use of the doctrine of substitution has been very frequent and very effective. Christ, as the substitute of sinners is declared to be the object of faith. But it is His substitution rather than Himself. To believe in substitution is what produces the peace. This serves to remove the sense of danger. There is no direct dealing with the Person who was the substitute. There is no appreciation of the merit of His sacrifice, because of the Divine glory of Him by whom it was offered. Faith, in the convenient arrangement for deliverance from danger, is substituted for trust in the Person who glorified God on the earth, and ‘in whom’ alone we can ‘have redemption through His blood.’ The blood of Jesus was referred to, and there was an oft-repeated ‘Biblereading’ on the subject of ‘the blood’; but what approximation to any right idea regarding it could there be in the mind, and what but misleading in the teaching, of one who could say, ‘Jesus left His blood on earth to cleanse you, but He brought His flesh and bones to heaven.’

William MacLean-Arminianism-Another Gospel

The Wednesday Word: A Bad Case of SDS!

The Wednesday Word: A Bad Case of SDS!

 

There are many Christians who have not as yet grasped the applications of the gospel. They have no idea how much God loves them.

Let me ask you—do you enjoy being a Christian—a follower of Jesus? Some folks, if they are honest, would have to answer “no” to that. They are not satisfied; they have a bad case of ‘SDS’… They’re ‘Saved, Dissatisfied and Stuck!

Does this description fit you? You are earnest, but you have no joy, you are sincere, but you have no peace. You are not sure whether or not God accepts you and your performance! You quietly think that if you can obey God He will accept you, but if you fail and disobey, He will reject you. You, my friend have caught a bad dose of religion! You are not walking in the gospel.

In the gospel, we learn that we are accepted with God, not because of our doing, but because of the doing of another, the Lord Jesus Christ (Romans 5:19). This is good news—this is Gospel Truth. We are accepted because of His performance. And yes, we do obey the Lord …but not to gain acceptance, rather, we obey because we have already been graciously accepted (Titus 3:8).

Acceptance with God is a central benefit of the gospel (Ephesians 1:6; John 1:16). This is a demonstration of God’s wisdom. After all, there can be no acceptable worship unless there are acceptable worshippers. This is not the way that religion tells it. The religious man thinks that by worship and performing his religion he can find acceptance with God: But the truth is just the opposite. Man must first be accepted and only then can he worship. He must first be accepted before He can present any acceptable worship to the Father.

The great mystery, when we consider things, is how the all-holy God can possibly accept us. We are, after all, by nature corrupted and vile sinners (Psalm 148:2; Mark 7:21-23). The gospel, however, answers this question for, by the gospel, we understand that our acceptance is in Christ alone! He has bought and paid for us with blood … His blood! Faith grasps and confidently holds to this.Faith knows that our works, prayers and tears cannot save us! Faith grasps that we are saved by Christ alone apart from any contribution we might hope to make. Faith causes us to rest in the truth that Christ’s blood has powerfully redeemed us!

Someone once said it like this;

 

“Faith is looking to Christ, not to how much faith I have. It is not faith that saves, but it is Christ who saves!

Faith is looking to Christ and not to my prayers, my worship, nor my meditations.

Faith is looking to Christ and neither to the name I wear nor the doctrines I hold. It is not what, but Whom we believe.

Faith is looking to Christ and not the law. The law wounds but never heals; it kills but never gives life.

Faith is looking to Christ and not to His mother, nor His apostles, nor to an image of a cross. There is one God and one Mediator.

Faith is looking to Christ, and not to the brethren; neither the best nor the worst of them – we put no confidence in the flesh.

Faith is looking to Christ, neither to my strength nor to my weakness. All grace or strength we have is by His grace, and when I am weak, then I am strong.

Faith is looking to Christ, not my works! Without Him our righteousness is filthy rags.

Faith is looking to Christ yesterday, today and tomorrow.

Faith is looking to Christ at all times, and we never stop coming, looking, resting, trusting, believing, depending nor leaning on the Lord Jesus Christ.”

 

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles McKee

 

Minister of the Gospel

The Grace Centre

6 Quay Street, New Ross,

County Wexford, Ireland.

www.milesmckee.com 

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Deepsouth Conference 2013

waldron-012013: God’s Covenant

The sixth annual Deep South Founders Conference gathered under the banner of “God’s Covenant,” January 17-19, 2013 on the Reformed Theological Seminary Jackson, Mississippi campus. Our special guest, Dr. Sam Waldron brought three messages regarding covenant theology. Three other speakers, Dale Crawford, Chas Rowland, and Dewey Wise, filled the pulpit as we explored the biblical truth expressed in chapter seven of the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. Attenders enjoyed a weekend of sound biblical preaching, rich theological discussion, and encouraging ministerial fellowship, which have become hallmarks of this conference.

Dr. Sam Waldron is the academic dean of the MidwestCenter for Theological Studies and professor of Systematic Theology. He is also one of the pastors of HeritageBaptistChurch in Owensboro, KY. Dr. Waldron received a B.A. from CornerstoneUniversity, an M.Div. from TrinityMinisterialAcademy, a Th.M. from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. From 1977 to 2001 he was a pastor of the Reformed Baptist Church of Grand Rapids, MI. Dr. Waldron is the author of numerous books including A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith, The End Times Made Simple, Baptist Roots in America, To Be Continued?, and MacArthur’s Millennial Manifesto: A Friendly Response. Dr. Waldron is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society.

 

Conference Audio:

Whatever happened to the Covenant of Works? – Dr. Sam Waldron

Should you believe in the Covenant of Grace? – Dr. Sam Waldron

Are the Old and New Covenants really one and the same? – Dr. Sam Waldron

The Requirement of Faith – Dr. Chas Rowland

The Eternal Covenant Transaction Between The Father and The Son – Pastor Dale Crawford

The Holy Spirit’s Influence on the Creature’s Will – Dewey Wise

 

Pre-Conference Debate:

On Thursday evening, January 17, 2013 (6:30 pm) Dr. Samuel E. Waldron and Dr. Elliott E. Johnson debated the topic of Covenant Theology vs Dispensationalism in the chapel of the Reformed Theological seminary, Jackson MS. Dr. Johnson serves as Senior Professor of Bible Exposition at Dallas Theological Seminary.

Covenant Theology vs Dispensationalism

 

Source [DeepSouthFounders]

A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine-15-Good Works

January 30, 2014 1 comment

Good Works

 

1. Has not God offered life and happiness upon the performance of good works?

He has.

2. Have any of mankind ever been justified in that way?

None have been thus justified.

3. Why is this?

Because, having a sinful nature, no man can perform good works in an acceptable manner.

4. Since, then, we are saved by faith alone, does God still require good works?

He does, and gives us grace to help us do them.

5. Are they to be performed with any hope of attaining salvation?

They are not; for we can never perfectly perform them in this life.

6. From what motive then?

From a spirit of love and obedience.

7. What, then., is the position of works in God’s way of justification?

They are the fruits and evidence of a change of heart and of love to God.

8. With what motive should we let men see our good works?

With the hope that thus they may be led to glorify God.

 

James P. Boyce-A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine

A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine-14-Justification

January 23, 2014 1 comment

Justification

 

1. What is Justification?

It is an act of God, by which He fully acquits us of all sin.

2. Is it based upon any works of our own?

It is not; by our own works we could never secure it.

3. Is it not, however, intimately connected with some act of ours?

Yes, with the exercise of faith.

4. Is it due to our faith in Christ?

It is not; that faith becomes the instrument only, not the cause of our justification.

5. To what, then, is it due?

Simply to the merits and sufferings of Christ, which are accounted by God as ours.

6. What do the Scriptures mean when they say that we are justified by faith?

In part, they are teaching that our justification is not by works.

7. What else do they mean?

They also speak thus, because in the act of faith the believer takes hold of the meritorious work of Christ, which is the true ground of justification.

8. Why does the Apostle James say that we are justified by works and not by faith only?

He refers to the fact that every one that has true faith also performs good works.

 

James P. Boyce-A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine