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Posts Tagged ‘Miracles’

The Wednesday Word: The Man Who Walked on Water

December 19, 2018 Leave a comment

God moves in a mysterious way

His wonders to perform;

He plants His footsteps in the sea

And rides upon the storm.

William Cowper

Matthew 14: 25-27

Some years ago in India, a noted exponent of yoga claimed he would walk upon water. Six hundred spectators came to observe him perform this feat and paid good money just to watch.

The Yogi warmed up by swallowing what he said were tacks and nitric acid. And then in order to warm his feet, walked over some hot embers. Then he climbed to the top of a steel tank filled with water, tried to stand on top of the water and sank immediately to the bottom.

Walking on water? Impossible!!..well almost.

Do you remember the story of Matthew 14?

Christ’s disciples were out on the lake struggling in the midst of a tempest. The once calm sea had turned to a boiling cauldron. They were in distress, and here comes the Master to their rescue.

Look at Him, Master of Land and Sea … Here He comes, walking on the waves. Look at him. Observe His regal bearing. Look at Him with the wind in His hair. Look at Him planting His footsteps on the water. Look at Him, His garments billowing back, …What majesty!

What a demonstration of Deity.

Some hours before these events transpired, Jesus had sent His disciples across the lake in a boat while He retired to pray. But when the disciples were in the middle of the sea, a storm broke out. The disciples were in deep, deep trouble and Jesus came walking to them.

This is amazing … how did He know the disciple’s location? It was pitch black. There would have been no visibility. It was the Fourth Watch…after 3 AM. Despite this, Jesus walked straight out to them, in the middle of the lake, in complete darkness.

Not surprisingly, the disciples are in shock and horror. They think they are seeing a ghost. But their horror soon turns to Hallelujahs when they hear the Master say, “It is I; be not afraid.”

What Jesus literally said is, “Don’t be afraid, I Am.” He used the name for Yahweh. He claimed to be the ‘I Am’ to identify Himself. What He told them was, ‘I am GOD the Most Holy and Only One.’

Walking on water is spectacular but that’s not the point we want to take away from this. The point is that it is the divine prerogative of Yahweh alone to walk on water. Job 9:8 says; “He alone spreads out the heavens and treads upon the waves of the sea.”

Yahweh alone treads upon the sea.

Jesus walked on water.

Therefore, Jesus is Yahweh!

Think about it, when’s the last time you saw anyone walk on water that wasn’t frozen? Indeed, the possibility of such a thing as a person walking on waster is non-existent. I’ve read that the Egyptian hieroglyphic for ‘impossibility’ is a man walking on waves. Even Neptune, the Roman God of the Sea, was never depicted as walking on water. This would have been too great a feat for Him so instead of walking, he swam.

Many of us who have grown up knowing about the events in Christ’s life can easily miss their significance. We are not surprised when we see Jesus demonstrating His power and majesty because, after all, that’s the kind of thing He does. However, one of the reasons He did these wonderful things was to demonstrate that He was God in flesh appearing!

When it came to crossing the Red Sea, God opened the water for Moses.

When it came to crossing the Jordan River, God opened the waters for Joshua.

But when it came to Himself, God just walked over the water like it was a paved road. If Jesus had split the water, we would have seen that he was a great prophet but since he walked on water, we see that He, in fact, is God.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

Don’t Put God in a Box

by Erik Raymond

When you read the NT you see the demonstration and description of miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit. Right away on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2) the people are speaking in tongues. Not long after we see the dead raised, lame healed, and people transported. It is a powerful outbreaking of the Holy Spirit in an arresting way.

When you read these things (and their corresponding descriptions, instructions, and warnings) a Christian must ask if these so-called miraculous gifts are operative today (i.e. the gifts of tongues, healing, & prophecy). Do we today see the same types of things happening as we did in the early chapters of Acts?

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Did Christ die for our sicknesses or our sins?

February 4, 2014 5 comments

Arthur PinkFirst it must be said that much of the teaching which has been given out on this subject is decidedly unscriptural. For example, the majority of those who emphasize “Divine healing” insist that it was “in the Atonement,” that on the Cross Christ was as truly our sickness-bearer as our sin-bearer, that He purchased healing for the body as well as salvation for the soul, and that therefore every Christian has the same right to appropriate by faith the cure of bodily disorders as he has forgiveness for his transgressions. In support of this contention appeal is made to Christ who

 

“healed all that were sick, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Isaiah the prophet: Himself took our infirmities and bare our sicknesses” (Matthew 8:16, 17).

 

Here is where the expositor is needed if the unlettered and unstable are to be preserved from jumping to an erroneous conclusion, where the mere sound of the words is likely to convey a wrong impression unless their sense be carefully ascertained—just as, “the dead know not anything” (Ecclesiastes 9:5) is not to be understood absolutely, as though they who have departed this life are in a state of utter unconsciousness.

Had those words “Christ bare our sicknesses” occurred in some passage in the Acts or Epistles where one of the apostles was explaining the purpose and character of Christ’s death, then we should have been obliged to regard them as meaning that the Lord Jesus vicariously endured the sicknesses of His people while on the Cross, though this would present a very great difficulty, for there is no hint anywhere in the Word that the Redeemer experienced any illness at that time. But instead, Matthew 8:16, 17 has reference to what transpired during the days of His public ministry, the meaning of which we take to be as follows. Christ employed not the virtue that was in Him to cure infirmity and sickness as a matter of mere power, but in deep pity and tenderness He entered into the condition of the sufferer. The great Physician was no unfeeling stoic, but took upon His own spirit the sorrows and pains of those to whom He ministered. His miracles of healing cost Him much in the way of sympathy and endurance.

Thus He “sighed” (Mark 7:34) when He loosed the tongue of the dumb, “wept” by the grave of Lazarus, and was conscious of virtue going out of Him (Mark 5:30) as He cured another. By a compassion, such as we are strangers to, He was afflicted by their afflictions.

That the interpretation we have given above (briefly suggested by the Puritan, Thomas Goodwin) is the correct meaning of “Himself took our infirmities and bare our sicknesses” appears from several considerations. If those words signified what the “Divine healing” cults say they do, then they mean that in His act of healing the sick Christ was then making atonement, which is absurd on the face of it. Again, if the healing of the body were a redemptive right which faith may humbly but boldly claim, then it necessarily follows that the believer should never die, for every time he fell ill he could plead before God the sacrifice of His Son and claim healing. In such a case, why did not Paul exhort Timothy to exercise faith in the Atonement rather than bid him “use a little wine for his stomach’s sake”

(1 Timothy 5:23), and why did he leave Trophimus at “Miletum sick” (2 Timothy 4:20)? A glorified body, as well as soul, is the fruit of Christ’s atonement, but for that the believer has to wait God’s appointed time.

Arthur W. Pink-Divine Healing-Is It Scriptural?

Arthur Pink used the term “strange fire” before John MacArthur did

January 21, 2014 5 comments

Arthur PinkEvery once in a while we receive an inquiry or a request for help on this subject, usually from one who has come into contact with some belonging to a cult which gives prominence to “Divine healing,” to the removal of physical ills without the aid of a doctor and medicine, in response to faith and prayer. Such inquiring friends are generally more or less perplexed. They have heard nothing on the subject in their own churches and feel they are more or less in the dark on the matter. Those who press this “Divine healing” teaching upon them appear to be ill-balanced people and not at all orthodox in doctrine. If they are induced to attend their meetings they are not favorably impressed, and sense that something is wrong. The absence of reverence, the allowing of women to take part in the services before a mixed congregation, the prominence of the spectacular element, and the general spirit of excitement which prevails, makes the normal child of God feel quite out of place in such a gathering. The zeal displayed does not appear to be according to knowledge and the fervid emotionalism strikes him as being “strange fire” (Leviticus 10:1)—not kindled at the Divine altar.

Arthur W. Pink-Divine Healing-Is It Scriptural?

Moses’ prophecies confirm that scripture is divine revelation

January 15, 2014 3 comments

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015The prophecies of Moses as to the scepter not departing from Judah, and the calling of the Gentiles.

7. Moreover, it is impossible to deny that he was guided by a prophetic spirit in assigning the first place to the tribe of Judah in the person of Jacob, especially if we take into view the fact itself, as explained by the event. Suppose that Moses was the inventor of the prophecy, still, after he committed it to writing, four hundred years pass away, during which no mention is made of a scepter in the tribe of Judah. After Saul is anointed, the kingly office seems fixed in the tribe of Benjamin, (1 Samuel 11:15; 16:13.) When David is anointed by Samuel, what apparent ground is there for the transference? Who could have looked for a king out of the plebeian family of a herdsman? And out of seven brothers, who could have thought that the honor was destined for the youngest? And then by what means did he afterwards come within reach of the throne? Who dare say that his anointing was regulated by human art, or skill, or prudence, and was not rather the fulfillment of a divine prophecy? In like manner, do not the predictions, though obscure, of the admission of the Gentiles into the divine covenant, seeing they were not fulfilled till almost two thousand years after, make it palpable that Moses spoke under divine inspiration? I omit other predictions which so plainly betoken divine revelation, that all men of sound mind must see they were spoken by God. In short, his Song itself (Deuteronomy 32) is a bright mirror in which God is manifestly seen.

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 8-Henry Beveridge Translation

Moses’ miracles and trials confirm that scripture is divine revelation

January 8, 2014 1 comment

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015Another profane objection refuted.

6. For it is also worthy of remark, that the miracles which he relates are combined with disagreeable circumstances, which must have provoked opposition from the whole body of the people, if there had been the smallest ground for it. Hence it is obvious that they were induced to assent, merely because they had been previously convinced by their own experience. But because the fact was too clear to leave it free for heathen writers to deny that Moses did perform miracles, the father of lies suggested a calumny, and ascribed them to magic, (Exodus 9:11.) But with what probability is a charge of magic brought against him, who held it in such abhorrence, that he ordered every one who should consult soothsayers and magicians to be stoned? (Leviticus 30:6.) Assuredly, no impostor deals in tricks, without studying to raise his reputation by amazing the common people. But what does Moses do? By crying out, that he and Aaron his brother are nothing, (Exodus 16:7,) that they merely execute what God has commanded, he clears himself from every approach to suspicion. Again, if the facts are considered in themselves, what kind of incantation could cause manna to rain from heaven every day, and in sufficient quantity to maintain a people, while any one, who gathered more than the appointed measure, saw his incredulity divinely punished by its turning to worms? To this we may add, that God then suffered his servant to be subjected to so many serious trials, that the ungodly cannot now gain anything by their glamour. When (as often happened) the people proudly and petulantly rose up against him, when individuals conspired, and attempted to overthrow him, how could any impostures have enabled him to elude their rage? The event plainly shows that by these means his doctrine was attested to all succeeding ages.

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 8-Henry Beveridge Translation

Evidence for the miracles which Moses wrought is found in the fact that no witness disputed what he wrote concerning his miracles

January 1, 2014 1 comment

calvin.jpg_7MA21605611-0015The miracles and prophecies of Moses. A profane objection refuted.

5. The many striking miracles which Moses relates are so many sanctions of the law delivered, and the doctrine propounded, by him. His being carried up into the mount in a cloud; his remaining there forty days separated from human society; his countenance glistening during the promulgation of the law, as with meridian effulgence; the lightnings which flashed on every side; the voices and thunderings which echoed in the air; the clang of the trumpet blown by no human mouth; his entrance into the tabernacle, while a cloud hid him from the view of the people; the miraculous vindication of his authority, by the fearful destruction of Korah, Nathan, and Abiram, and all their impious faction; the stream instantly gushing forth from the rock when struck with his rod; the manna which rained from heaven at his prayer; — did not God by all these proclaim aloud that he was an undoubted prophet? If any one object that I am taking debatable points for granted, the cavil is easily answered. Moses published all these things in the assembly of the people. How, then, could he possibly impose on the very eye-witnesses of what was done? Is it conceivable that he would have come forward, and, while accusing the people of unbelief, obstinacy, ingratitude, and other crimes, have boasted that his doctrine had been confirmed in their own presence by miracles which they never saw?

John Calvin-Institutes of the Christian Religion-Book I-Chapter 8-Henry Beveridge Translation