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Posts Tagged ‘Particular Baptist’

Updated Links: Reformed Baptist and Particular Baptist Links

Over the past year, I have been away from my home and thus, away from my blog. During that time I have received countless emails, from those who follow my blog and website, of which have notified me that many links were broken on my sites. I am putting this post out today to let everyone know that all links, except for the Free Ebooks Page (1), have been fixed or deleted. Those links that were deleted will be discussed below.

Sometimes in life a man must make a decision that will cause him to leave the comforts of his home, in order to better provide for his family. When a job plays out, a job which a man has been used to doing for many years, a man must seek out a job that will make him valuable in other fields of industry. That being said, I chose to go back to driving a big rig or tractor trailer for a year. Now mind you, I had not driven a big rig in 17 years however, I knew that a shortage in this industry would readily provide me with a job and after a year would make me valuable as a local driver. I have driven all over the United States in the last year. I have been in California, Washington, Massachusetts, and Florida; from one corner of the US to another. I have endured: driving in extreme weather conditions, loneliness, being away from family, missing birthdays and holidays, and being away from what I enjoy most; namely: studying theology and updating my blog and website. I have missed interacting with those, with whom I have had discussions concerning theology on the internet. So that being said, I am now back at home and seeking that local driving position. I am asking everyone to be in prayer for me that I will find a local driving job that will provide for my family and allow me to get back to studying the things of God.

Deleted Links

When I left a year ago Reformed Baptists were making strides in recovering a covenantal heritage which had been obscured or lost over time. Articles were being written, sermons preached, and Ebooks made available online, which defended what we believe, concerning faith and practice of that faith within the local Church. Articles which defended believers-only-baptism and that showed infant baptism to be an erroneous position not supported by scripture were only a click away. Sadly, this is not now the case.

I have links on my website from Reformed paedobaptists. Also on my Apologetics page I have links from Catholic Apologists(2) that defend God’s existence. These links, for the most part, were still working and have not been deleted. However, among my Particular Baptists brethren, things have changed quite a bit within a year.

Reformed Baptist, Particular Baptist, Sovereign Grace Baptist (5 Point Baptist those called Calvinistic Baptist) and Primitive Baptist links no longer work. (From now on I will just use the term Particular Baptist because all these branches, of what is known as Baptist, have this doctrine in common; although not all adhere to covenant theology). Articles that argued from a covenantal Baptist position or articles which proved infant baptism to be an erroneous position, not supported by scripture, have disappeared. Some articles which can be found with a search of the internet are no longer free, but one must buy some book in order to gain access to these materials. I am not saying that just articles have disappeared, whole websites which have been up and running for years, of which had free Ebooks from Spurgeon, Pink, Gill, etc… have completely shut down. Blogs that I followed which supported and defended the Particular Baptist position have been deleted. So you will notice, on my sidebar to the right, that my Blog Roll has decreased drastically.

What caused these blogs and websites to completely shut down or what caused articles to be taken down and concealed inside books that require a reader to purchase them? I do not know. Did someone at the top of the ladder fall into sin and have to be disciplined? Did a huge controversy over doctrine breakout in the Particular Baptist movement? At the present time, I have no answers.

The large majority of books or articles, which I thought defended our positions concerning doctrine, I possess within my own personal library. Even though I have much space within my own website to upload these materials, nevertheless to keep from infringing on copyrights, I had no choice but to remove the broken links and just allow what remains on my sites to suffice any student of theology.

So to close, I welcome everyone back to my sites, as the links have been restored or deleted.

God bless,

Hershel Lee Harvell Jr.

(1) The Free Ebooks page links will be fixed within the next few weeks. I appreciate your patience.

(2) I can hear the critics now. You mean you provide links to Roman Catholic Apologists? Yes, I most certainly do. Most of them defend a Christian worldview from a Classical Apologetics position and have some good articles against: moral relativism, the problem of evil, atheism and the defense of God’s existence, etc… Someone might say, “Well Classical Apologetics is not a good or true apologetic methodology for defending the Christian worldview.” However, this is an in-house debate, even among Protestants themselves. There is not a mutual agreement among Protestant theologians concerning epistemology.

As a disclaimer: Every link on my site is not there because I agree with every position that the writer of the article holds, but is there to provide a student of theology access to topics which will increase his knowledge in all areas of theology. For instance: On my Baptismal Debates Page, I have articles linked which defend a credo-Baptist position. I also have articles linked which either critic the credo-Baptist position or that defend a paedo-baptist position. The reason being, is that a student of theology can read both sides of the argument and decide for himself which position he will take. About 6 months after I came to the knowledge of Calvinism, I made an appointment with a PCA Pastor and questioned him concerning what I was learning. I wanted to make sure that I had a right understanding of the doctrines of grace. This Pastor did not rail on me and tell me that his position was the correct one concerning all that he believed, but instead encouraged me to keep studying and told me that I needed to study baptism and church government and decide whether or not I was going to hold to credo-baptism and congregationalism or whether I was going to hold to paedo-baptism and a Presbyterian form of church government.(a) So I studied both sides of the doctrinal positions and came to a point where I decided that the Reformed Baptist position was the correct one.

(a) The advise of this PCA Pastor was unlike that of the Pentecostal Pastor I sat under after I first got saved. The Pentecostal Pastor I sat under, after I first got saved, was adamant in stating that if I did not hold to every doctrine he does or if I did not interpret every scripture as he does, then I was a heretic. This is brainwashing and was not the signs of a true Pastor of a Church, but instead was the signs of a cult. I have come to realize, through study, that he was holding heretical positions. He even thinks that Martin Luther was wrong concerning being saved by faith alone. He believes, as Roman Catholics do, that salvation is through faith plus works. That was straight out of his mouth.

Free Ebook- Honey Out of the Rock

honey-rockby Thomas Wilcox

Available in ePub, Kindle .mobi and .pdf formats

Thomas Wilcox was born in August, 1621 at Lyndon, Rutland, and probably was well educated. He was a Particular Baptist elder of a small congregation, which met at his house in London before the Plague. In those days of persecution, he was known for moderation, and preached frequently among the Presbyterians and independents. He was imprisoned in Newgate more than once, and suffered much for the sake of Nonconformity. After 1665, he pastored a Particular Baptist church, whose meeting-house was a small wooden building in Three Cranes Alley, Tooley Street in the Borough of Southwark. He labored lovingly, with pen as well as tongue, until his death on May 17, 1687 at the age of 65, leaving a widow and three children.

Wilcox’s well-known tract, “A Choice Drop of Honey from the Rock Christ,” often reprinted, and also translated, was much used of God. In the early 18th century there lived in central Finland a farmer named Paavo Ruotsalainen; here in the wilderness of Savo he had no other schooling apart from attending confirmation classes, but he loved reading, and in his early years was given a Bible, a very rare gift in those days; he had read it through three times by the time he was sixteen. For a long time he was unable to find peace for his soul, so much so that his family feared for his mind. Then Willcox ’s tract came his way,and showed him the one thing needful. Also he heard of a smith who might help him, and having found him, he was given the news that Christ would make himself known to him, a needy sinner; and it was but a short time before the Lord granted peace.

Soon we find that Ruotsalainen was going about preaching; it is estimated that if all of his journeys were added together,it would amount to a voyage around the world, and all the time he was a farmer needing to attend to his fields, and making most journeys by foot. He found that communion with Christ is not only made a reality to those alone who recognize their own wretchedness, but also that only by the same acknowledgement can this communion be maintained. For many, the sweet sensations of forgiveness are experienced solely in the early stages of conversion. One of his much quoted statements goes like this: “You started on your way with honey, but now have pitch and tar for food.” He feared a false security based on a dead faith. Only in the school of the cross is grace given; only the re, is the Christian assured of his salvation.

In his old well-thumbed Bible, preserved in Aholans aari, the farm in Nilsia where he spent the last years of his life, he had someone write the following words: “In this book lies the secret and kernel of the whole of life, and no one, neither the good nor the clever, can know or understand this great and precious secret, when his eyes have not been opened to his own wretchedness.” Taught thus by the Lord, he thought deeply and knew well what was in the heart of man. He became the Huntington of Finland. Many valued his counsel, and he saw the Lord raise up a generation of preachers, and many communities of the Lord’s people gathered as a result of his ministry; and so much stemmed in the first place, under God’s blessing to the reading of “A Choice Drop of Honey from the Rock Christ.” We now send forth his tract, which was recommend ed by William Romaine in his day, desiring the Lord’s rich blessing upon it.

 

Source [Monergism.com]

Baptist Confession of 1689 (2013)

October 14, 2015 1 comment

Shubal Stearns and the Separate Baptist Tradition

by Josh Powell

This article was written in collaboration with Tom Nettles. Dr. Nettles has expanded and edited this material further for inclusion in The Baptists, Vol. 2.

The year was 1758 and God had richly blessed the gospel strategy of the Separate Baptists in North Carolina. Just three years before, a group led by Shubal[1] Stearns had settled at Sandy Creek and constituted a church. Within those short three years with “a few churches having been constituted, and these having a number of branches which were fast maturing for churches,”[2] Stearns thought it would be a good idea to start an association. The Separates’ remarkable personalities, novel practices, and fiery style of worship and preaching prompted some special attention from the Particular Baptists. Because some gave credit to disturbing reports about these ecclesiological kin, John Gano , who had been commissioned to his work in North Carolina by the Philadelphia Association, attended the 1759 meeting of the Sandy Creek Association. “He was sent, it seems, to inquire into the state of these New Light Baptists.”[3] Robert Baylor Semple reports the visit in this way:

He was received by Stearns with great affection. But the young and illiterate preachers were afraid of him, and kept at a distance. They even refused to invite him into their Association. All this he bore patiently, sitting by while they transacted their business. He preached also every day. His preaching was in the Spirit of the Gospel. Their hearts were opened, so that before he left they were greatly attached to him…. This Association was also conducted in love, peace and harmony. When Mr. Gano returned to his own country, being asked what he thought of these Baptists, he replied, that “doubtless the power of God was among them; that although they were rather immethodical, they certainly had the root of the matter at heart.”[4]

Read the entire article here.

Tom Nettles expanded article can be downloaded here.

The Raw Calvinism of the North Carolina Separates of the Sandy Creek Tradition

A Product of Right Doctrine
In the Right Place at the Right Time

Gene M. Bridges

On November 7, 2005, the Sandy Creek Baptist Church celebrated its 250th Anniversary. The church was founded in 1755 by Shubal Stearns and his brother-in-law Daniel Marshall. In 1758, they established an association. Within seventeen years, the church grew to a membership of over six hundred. It spawned forty-two other churches. Many Southern Baptist historians look to the Sandy Creek Church as one of two tributaries that eventually formed the Southern Baptist Convention in the 19th century, and they often perpetuate a popularized theory from Walter Shurden and Fisher Humphreys[1] alleging that the “high church” Charlestonians were confessional Calvinists, while those in the Sandy Creek Association were either opposed to Calvinism or believed in a “softer” or “moderate” or “kinder, gentler” Calvinism. Moreover, they imply that the Charlestonians were less evangelistic than the Sandy Creek Association.

Read the entire article here.

This article can also be found in the Founders Journal-Issue 66. Download the Pdf here.

Sandy Creek Revisited

by Tom Ascol

One of the most popular and widely repeated explanations for the doctrinal make up of the Southern Baptist Convention is that the denomination was formed by the convergence of two distinct, if not opposite theological traditions. These traditions are often referred to as the “Charleston” and “Sandy Creek” streams, named after the two churches and associations that best represent those traditions.

Charleston refers to the First Baptist Church of Charleston (established in 1682 and relocated to Charleston in 1696) and the Charleston Baptist Association of churches (established in 1751). The Second London Baptist Confession of Faith was the doctrinal foundation of the church and was formerly adopted by the association, as well. As a result it became known throughout the south as the “Charleston Confession.” This association, like its sister association in Philadelphia that was formed in 1707, was thoroughly committed to the Particular (or Calvinistic) Baptist viewpoint on the sovereignty of God in salvation. In America, those of this persuasion became known as Regular Baptists.

Sandy Creek is the name of the church that was founded in North Carolina in 1755 by Shubal Stearns and his brother-in-law, Daniel Marshall. Three years later an association of churches by that same name was formed. These Baptists largely came out of the Great Awakening in the middle of the 18th century and were known as Separate Baptists. The churches that joined together in forming the Sandy Creek Association had a healthy skepticism regarding confessions and creeds. This grew out of experience with the dead orthodoxy that many of them had left behind in their former Congregationalism. This distinguished them from the Regular Baptists, who were enthusiastically confessional in their churches. However, this distinction must not be stretched beyond what the historical record will bear.

Read the entire article here.

This article can also be found in the Founders Journal-Issue 66. Download the Pdf here.

“Things are bad where there is need of so many remedies”

September 9, 2015 Leave a comment

Christopher Blackwood, a Particular Baptist minister, said the following regarding infant baptism:

“It fills the conscience with scruples. Some question whether they were ever baptized. Some question how could I make a covenant by myself, much less by others, being an infant. Some think there is no word at all for what is herein done, but it’s only a laudable Apostolic tradition. Some think it a sign of faith in present, others in infants. But that which causeth most scruple is, about the formalis ratio, the formal cause that [entitles] a man to this infant baptism. Some think the faith of the parents, or of those that offer them, doth [entitle] them hereto. Others think that the faith of their Grand-father, great-grandfather to many generations if none be neerer, that were godly of the race, the faith of Noah shall serve. Others think the faith of the whole Church. Others think that Children’s seminal faith makes them capable hereof, the nature whereof who can understand, seeing all faith requires an act of the understanding which infants have not. Some think Abraham’s faith doth it. Some think there is an inward covenant which was made to Abraham, whereby whatsoever God is to a godly man, he is the same to all the seed. Nay say others; seeing many of the godly’s seed are wicked, this is impossible but there is a certain outward covenant, formerly in circumcision, now in baptism whereby infants do partake. Talk with ten men, and you shall see them divided into five parts about the formal cause that entitles an infant to baptism. It’s a speech of Erasmus, ‘Things are bad where there is need of so many remedies.’”

Blackwood was educated at Cambridge and ordained in the Church of England. He renounced infant baptism in 1644. This is from his book, The Storming of Antichrist, published the same year.

 

 

Source [Particular Voices]