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Posts Tagged ‘Particular Baptists’

The retreat of the Reformed Baptist Movement & there will be no Baptist Library Vol 2 at the moment

February 8, 2019 4 comments

It seems that within the last few years the Reformed Baptist movement has taken a step or two backwards. Blogs that used to provide great content for Reformed (Particular) Baptists or websites that did the same, have disappeared over the last few years. The Confessing Baptist site is gone. One cannot click a link for it without getting an error message. Pb Ministries has disappeared. I could go on and on listing sites, but you all should get the picture just by the few I listed.

It also seems that there is little to no interest for a library for Reformed (Particular) Baptists. Having spent upwards to 18 hours a day building the Vol I Library has done nothing to peak the interest among Reformed (Particular) Baptists. I have had a few suggestions that I should build a library that would be Baptist friendly and that would also be an alternative to the Puritan Hard Drive. In other words, several folks have told me that I should build a library that would require the selling of a hard drive for Reformed (Particular) Baptists.

This was my goal. My goal was to build a library that was Baptist friendly and also a library that was so big that it would have to fit on a hard-drive. However, since releasing The Baptist Library Vol I. I have sold absolutely no copies. My posts have been shared on Facebook, Reddit, Tumbler, Youtube, Linkedin, and this blog. I have also had my post shared in several Facebook groups that are centered on Reformed Baptist Theology.

With 350 Cd’s ready to ship, but no buyers of said Cd’s, I have stopped thinking about a library for Reformed (Particular) Baptists and have started concentrating on how I will pay my bills. So for the time being, all work has ceased and it looks like I will be going back out on the road driving a big rig.

Now I don’t mind working and I love truck driving, however, I also love trying to build a library that will equip saints for the ministry of spreading the gospel. This is my number one goal in life and that is to develop something that will aide people in their study of the Bible and in making them more knowledgeable in sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ.

So my heart is divided. I want more than anything to put that drive together, yet I also have to provide for my household. Seeing that a labourer or worker is worthy of his hire, no matter if he has a secular job, or if he is in the ministry of equipping the saints, then whatsoever he does ought to provide for his household. With that said, I have come across many a website that claims one should not make money or be paid for their work in the things of God. This is simply not true. Scripture is plain that a minster is worthy of his hire and that ministry ought to provide for the necessities of this life.

Once I go back out on the road everything will continue on here at Reformedontheweb as usual. I have placed enough post in scheduled post mode, so that I don’t have to touch this blog for several months. However, as I have time, I will log into this site and answer questions, moderator comments, and pre-schedule some more post.

The Baptist Library Vol I will still be available for purchase while I am gone. This includes all individual collections as well. My wife will ship out the orders while I am on the road.

Thank you to all those who have followed this blog over the past 9 years.

Sincerely,

Hershel L Harvell Jr.

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Six Ways a Church Should Use a Confession of Faith

by Jeff Robinson

Particular Baptist churches planted in the tumultuous soil of 17th century England grew up and bore fruit under a nasty set of doctrinal and methodological accusations, including that they subscribed to libertarian free will, denied original sin, that their pastors baptized women in the nude, and were opponents of church and crown.

Perhaps their most virulent and colorful opponent, Daniel Featley—a separatist persecutor deluxe—derisively dismissed our Baptist forebears, writing in a venom-filled pamphlet, “They pollute our rivers with their filthy washings.” Such was Baptist life under Charles I.

These nefarious charges and numerous others arose from leaders of the state church and led to decades of grinding persecution….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Free Ebook- Origins of the Particular Baptists

June 24, 2016 1 comment

by Gordon L. Belyea

This document traces the origins of the Particular Baptist from the English Separatists movement.

 

 

Download here. (Pdf)

Are the Republicationist & Coxe/Owen Views of the Mosaic Covenant Related?

While the majority of Particular Baptists agree that the Mosaic Covenant is a Covenant of Works, how it relates to the original Covenant of Works varies in their thought. Some state in the strongest terms that it IS the original Covenant of Works reapplied to Israel. That would make eternal life possible through the Mosaic Covenant itself, a point that Coxe and Owen would have disagreed with (and I disagree there too). Coxe makes a brief but helpful comment here:

 

 

 

Read the entire blog post here.

“Traditional” Baptists Under the Microscope of History

Founders Journal 89 · Summer 2012 · pp. 7–33

“Traditional” Baptists Under the Microscope of History

Tom Nettles

The following is an expanded version of an address delivered at the Founders Fellowship Breakfast on June 19, 2012 at the Southern Baptist Convention in New Orleans, LA.

Recently, a group of anti-Calvinist Baptists claimed that they have exclusive rights to the term “Traditional Baptist.” Calvinists, therefore, should resign themselves to the status of a distinct minority among Southern Baptists and be willing to receive the grace of mere toleration. With that they should be happy, and be content to expect little else. Perhaps a bit of historical perspective can serve to amend this strange perception.

A Doctrinal Profile of Baptist Identity

When Baptists emerged out of seventeenth-century English Separatism, they already were identified with several specific marks inherited from the Reformation. The Theological Orthodoxy of the early church, received by the Reformers, they claimed as their own. Like their fellows Protestants, they revolted from the sacerdotalism that dominated Roman Catholic soteriology and developed a more highly purified evangelicalism than even their Protestant brothers. The confessional stewardship that had thrived in early Christianity and that was renewed in sixteenth-century Protestantism became an important and strategic part of Baptist witness. Confessions operated at three levels for Baptists, as indicated by a confession adopted by the Mt. Nebo Baptist Church in Louisiana. First a confession….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here or download the journal here.

Consider the 1689

by J. Ryan Davidson

Huddled together in 1644, representatives of 7 churches gathered to summarize their common confession, and to distinguish themselves from the Anabaptists and the Arminians. It was a time of turmoil, and the river of the Reformation had swept across the banks of London. This was one of the first of several non-Anglican groups in that century to put pen to paper and confess their faith. Two years later, the Westminster Assembly would produce its own confession (WCF), and then in 1658, the Congregationalists would follow suit (Savoy Declaration). That original group of 7 churches was the Particular Baptists. Amid persecution, and to show their solidarity and theological agreement in many ways with the Presbyterians and Congregationalists that had since written their own confessions, a larger crop of Baptists would draft the 1677 Baptist Confession with great reliance on the WCF and Savoy, however due to persecution, this document would not be published until 1689, giving it the name that it is known by today: “The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith”. This Confession was classically theist in its view of God, covenantal in its view of Biblical Theology, “Calvinist” in its soteriology, and would show alignment with the Westminster Confession of Faith on the Ordinary Means of Grace and the Law. I grew up Baptist, became Calvinistic in my soteriology in my teen years, and have found a wonderful home in the confessional roots of Baptist theology as a pastor in my mid-thirties. To me, this Historic Confession, similar to the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Savoy Declaration, is worth considering for at least five reasons:

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.