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What’s new in the revised edition of the Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology?

February 13, 2017 Leave a comment

distinctiveness-revised-194x300By Pascal Denault

Since my book first came out in January of 2013, I wanted to revise it. At first it was minor corrections and typos, but along the way came some important precision that I wanted to include in my work. I have written this blog post to explain what’s new in the revised edition of the Distinctiveness. If you think it’s worth it, you may buy the paperback version or the kindle version (available beginning of next week Feb. 12th) on Amazon. Let’s start with a new endorsement by an important French theologian.

HENRI BLOCHER

The French-speaking Baptists, at least those from Europe (as I am), often ignore the Reformed origin from which the Baptist faith emerged—the genealogical continuity is certain. The fine work of this French Canadian pastor on the theology of the covenant, or the covenants, which was elaborated by the ancient Baptist doctors debating the other Reformed theologians, vividly presents this rooting. It also highlights….

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

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2015 Founders Conference Now Online

The Distinctives of Baptist Covenant Theology

SEPTEMBER 24-25, 2015

2015 Founders Conference on SermonAudio.com


Psalm 32 Devotional by Jarrett Downs

What Does it Mean to be Baptist and Reformed? by Rev. Fred Malone

The Relationship of the Covenant of Grace to the Old Covenant by Pascal Denault

Hebrews 8 and the New Covenant by Jeffrey D. Johnson

The Relationship of the Covenant of Grace to the New Covenant by Pascal Denault

Contemporary Challenges by Jeffrey D. Johnson

Q and A by Various Speakers

Implications of Covenant Theology by Jeffrey D. Johnson

Galatians 4:21-31 by Pascal Denault

Hosted by: Heritage Baptist Church, Mansfield, Texas

1689 Federalism

1689 Federalism is the Particular Baptist understanding of the Covenant of Grace as stated in the Second London Confession of Faith of 1689. This particular view is distinct from the Westminster view that holds to the concept of one Covenant of Grace under two distinct administrations which are the Old and the New Covenants. From this view, the Westminster Confession allows the Old Covenant to define the Covenant of Grace (its nature, its stipulations, its blessings) and end up with a Covenant of Grace that is mixed by nature because it includes the physical posterity of all those who profess faith. This understanding was perceived by the Particular Baptists to alter the nature of the New Covenant which is « not like » the Old Covenant (Jer. 31:32) and is pure by nature (Jer. 31:34).

The 1689 Confession rejects the One Covenant/Two administrations view of the Westminster. Instead, it affirms that the Covenant of Grace was only revealed in the Old Testament time until it became a formal covenant when the New Covenant was established. Therefore, the Particular Baptist understanding considers that only the New Covenant is the Covenant of Grace and defines it. This involves that the Old Covenant was not the Covenant of Grace and was only typologically linked to it but was in itself an earthly covenant that came to an end when the heavenly reality was established. Instead of seeing two realities (earthly/heavenly, internal/external) inside of the same covenant of grace, the 1689 Federalism affirms two distinct covenants: an earthly external covenant (the Old) and an heavenly internal covenant (the New). The New Covenant was first a promise that was put under the guard of the Law (the Old Covenant). It was then accomplished, sealed in the blood of Christ and given to believers in the form of a covenant.

In the lectures below, I expose chapter 7 of the 1689 (Of God’s Covenant). These lectures were given at the Reformed Baptist Seminary module on Creeds and Confessions held in Las Vegas October 2014. I offer here the MP3 files, the videos are available at RBS website: http://rbseminary.org/home/pascal-denault-on-the-covenant-theology-of-the-1689-baptist.html

You can find a French version of this teaching here: http://www.unherautdansle.net/alliances/

1. The Covenant of Works (7.1) – Audio MP3

2. The Covenant of Grace – Paedo view (7.2) – Audio MP3

3. The Covenant of Grace – Credo view (7.3) – Audio MP3

4. Summary and conclusions – Audio MP3

5. Q&A (Dr. Bob Gonzales and Pascal Denault) – Audio MP3

 

 

Source [ unherautdansle.net]

Did A.W. Pink Agree with 1689 Federalism?

A.W. Pink’s covenant theology came up recently in a Facebook discussion. It was being questioned if Pink held to 1689 Federalism or “20th Century Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology“. (Federalism is just an old word for covenant theology)

First, here is a summary of 1689 Federalism:

By rejecting the notion of a Covenant of Grace under two administrations, the Baptists were in fact rejecting only half of this concept: they accepted, as we have previously seen, the notion of one single Covenant of Grace in both testaments, but they refused the idea of two administrations. For the Baptists, there was only one Covenant of Grace which was revealed from the Fall in a progressive way until its full revelation and conclusion in the New Covenant… If the Westminster federalism can be summarized in “one covenant under two administrations,” that of the 1689 would be “one covenant revealed progressively and concluded formally under the New Covenant.

-The Distinctiveness of 17th Century Particular Baptist Covenant Theology, Pascal Denault, p. 61

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

A Difference Between Reformed Baptist And Paedobaptist Covenant Theology

From the pen of Pascal Denault:

What I mean is this: The law, introduced 430 years later, does not set aside the covenant previously established by God and thus do away with the promise. For if the inheritance depends on the law, then it no longer depends on the promise; but God in his grace gave it to Abraham through a promise. (Gal. 3:17-18)

Paul clearly affirms that it is through the Abrahamic Covenant that God promised his grace and that the Mosaic Covenant which came about 430 years later did not bring the inheritance nor did it replace the Abrahamic Covenant . The paeodbaptists understood from this passage that the Abrahamic Covenant was the Covenant of Grace, the covenant through which God grants his grace to Abraham and his posterity, and that the Judaizers were mistaken in demanding obedience to the Law of Moses as a condition in order to obtain the inhereitance. The Presbyterian paradigm of the Covenant of Grace was confirmed by this interpretation: the Covenant of Grace that God concluded with Abraham included his physical posterity; the Covenant of Grace was, therefore, a Covenant of a mixed nature in which one entered at birth.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.