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The Wednesday Word: Our Faithful God

We are assured by Jesus himself that “not one sparrow can fall to the ground without permission¨ (Matthew 10:29).

Our God is faithful!

We are also told that we are of more value than many sparrows (Matthew 10:31). And no wonder we are valuable. We are the purchase of blood. God’s blood (Acts 20:28). We, as His purchased possession, have the assurance that He is faithful (Deuteronomy 7:9).

All is well! He has not lost sight of you. He will supply.

He is faithful!

One of our problems is that we usually don’t go to the Lord Jesus with our trials. We choose worry rather than trust. We don’t; “Cast our burdens on the Lord.” We forget that He will “sustain us” (Psalm 55:22).

He is faithful!

By the way, the word ‘sustain’ contains a promise of support. Christ’s sustaining hand surrounds us whether we feel it or not. As we grow in grace, we learn to trust where we can’t trace. In other words, we don’t let our feelings dominate and guide us.

He is Faithful!

It is promised, “Many are the afflictions of the righteous, but the Lord delivers (us) out of one or two of them” (Psalm 34:19). Are you serious? No! He delivers us from them all! Try Him! Trust Him! Venture yourself on Him!

He is Faithful!

Also, think of these further sustaining promises from our Faithful God: Philippians 4:2 ” Thy God shall supply all your need according to the riches of his glory in Christ Jesus.”

Isaiah 33:16 “Bread shall be given, water shall be sure,”

Are you worried about finances? Here’s some good news .. we have a faithful God. He isn’t suffering a lack of funds. Look at Haggai 2:8 “The silver is mine, the gold is mine, saith the Lord of hosts.” Then there’s Psalm 50:10 which tells us that, “The cattle upon the thousand hills” are His. We are being cared for by the One who owns and possesses all and He’s a giver not a taker.

The Lord can and does provide from the most unusual sources. This is clearly seen in Matthew 17. Money was needed for the temple tax. So, being near the lake, Jesus told Peter to throw out the line and take the first fish he caught, open its mouth and the money would be there.

The Lord Jesus provided money from a fish so let’s be open to His abundance of supply coming to us in any manner.

” This God is the God I adore,

A faithful unchangeable friend;

His love is as great as his power,

And knows neither beginning nor end.

‘Tis Jesus, the first and the last,

Whose Spirit shall guide me safe home;

I’ll praise him for all that is past,

And trust him for all that’s to come.”

Frances Havergal, the hymn writer, could have felt forgotten by God. She suffered terribly from peritonitis and died from it in her early forties. On the last day of her life, she asked a friend to read Isaiah 42 to her. When the friend read the sixth verse, “I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee,” Miss Havergal stopped her. She whispered,

“Called;”

“Held”

“Kept.”

“I can go home on that!”

And, later that day she did go home on that, resting in the faithfulness of her God and Saviour Jesus Christ. One of her best-loved Hymns is, “Like a River Glorious.” The third verse reads,

“Every joy or trial falleth from above,

Trac’d upon our dial by the Sun of Love;

We may trust Him fully all for us to do;

They who trust Him wholly find Him wholly true.”

It was true for her; it has been true of every one of God’s elect,

Called;

Held;

Kept.

We can go home on that! Even when God seems to have forgotten us, we can trust Him and find Him wholly true.

He is the Faithful God.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

God will in all ages have His people regulated by His promises

September 3, 2013 3 comments

PinkAS IT IS particularly the Old Testament promises of which Dispensationalists would deprive the Christian, a more definite and detailed refutation of this error is now required—coming, as it obviously does within the compass of our present subject. We will here transcribe what we wrote thereon almost twenty years ago.

2. God will in all ages have His people regulated by His promises, so that they may exercise faith, hope, prayer, dependence upon Himself: He gives them promises so as to test them, whether or not they really trust in and count upon Him.

Arthur W. Pink The Application of Scriptures-A Study of Dispensationalism

Earthly blessings foreshadowed or pointed to heavenly blessings

Arthur Pink

What is true of the Old Testament precepts (generally speaking, for there are, of course, exceptions to every rule) holds equally good to the Old Testament promises—believers today are fully warranted in mixing faith therewith and expecting to receive the substance of them. First, because those promises were made to saints as such, and what God gives to one He gives to all (2 Peter 1:4)—Christ purchased the self-same blessings for every one of His redeemed. Second, because most of the Old Testament promises were typical in their nature: earthly blessings adumbrated heavenly ones. That is no arbitrary assertion of ours, for anyone who has been taught of God knows that almost everything during the old economies had a figurative meaning, shadowing forth the better things to come. Many proofs of this will be given by us a little later. Third, a literal fulfillment to us of those promises must not be excluded, for since we be still on earth and in the body our temporal needs are the same as theirs, and if we meet the conditions attached to those promises (either expressed or implied), then we may count upon the fulfillment of them: according unto our faith and obedience so will it be unto us.

Arthur W. Pink The Application of Scriptures-A Study of Dispensationalism

The Old Testament promises possessed a spiritual and carnal significance

Arthur PinkIt must also be borne in mind that, in keeping with the character of the covenant under which they were made, many of the precepts and the promises given unto the patriarchs and their descendants possessed a spiritual and typical significance and value, as well as a carnal and literal one. As an example of the former, take Deuteronomy 25:4,

 

“Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn,”

 

and then mark the application made of those words in 1 Corinthians 9:9,10:

 

“Doth God take care for oxen? Or saith He it altogether for our sakes? For our sakes, no doubt, this is written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope.”

 

The word “altogether” is probably a little too strong here, for pantos is rendered “no doubt” in Acts 28:4, and “surely” in Luke 4:23, and in the text signifies “assuredly” (Amer. RV) or “mainly for our sakes.” Deuteronomy 25:4 was designed to enforce the principle that labour should have its reward, so that men might work cheerfully. The precept enjoined equity and kindness: if so to beasts, much more so to men, and especially the ministers of the Gospel. It is a striking illustration of the freedom with which the Spirit of grace applies the Old Testament Scriptures, as a constituent part of the Word of Christ, unto Christians and their concerns.

Arthur W. Pink The Application of Scriptures-A Study of Dispensationalism

Dispensationalist claim–not all scripture is for the Church

January 22, 2013 3 comments

Arthur PinkNot satisfied with their determined efforts to deprive us of the Old Testament, these would-be super-expositors dogmatically assert that the four Gospels are Jewish, and that the Epistles of James and Peter, John and Jude are designed for a “godly Jewish remnant” in a future “tribulation period,” that nothing but the Pauline Epistles contain “Church truth,” and thousands of gullible souls have accepted their ipse digit—those who decline so doing are regarded as untaught and superficial. Yet God Himself has not uttered a single word to that effect. Certainly there is nothing whatever in 2 Timothy 2:15, to justify such a revolutionizing method of interpreting the Word: that verse has no more to do with the sectioning of Scripture between different “dispensations” than it has with distinguishing between stars of varying magnitude. If that verse be carefully compared with Matthew 7:6, John 16:12 and 1 Corinthians 3:2, its meaning is clear. The occupant of the pulpit is to give diligence in becoming equipped to give the different classes of his hearer “their portion of meat in due season” (Luke 12:42). To rightly divide the Word of Truth is for him to minister it suitably unto the several cases and circumstances of his congregation: to sinners and saints, the indifferent and the inquiring, the babes and fathers, the tempted and afflicted, the backslidden and fallen.

Arthur W. Pink The Application of Scriptures-A Study of Dispensationalism

God has given us abundant examples of fulfilled promises

September 17, 2012 2 comments

God has not only dealt largely in promises, but has given us abundance of examples of their fulfillment. A large part of scripture prophecy has already been converted into history. Unto us a child is actually born; unto us a son is given; the government is upon his should; his name is called Wonderful, Counselor, the Might God, the Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace. But the same authority which foretold this, has added, Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end. There is also a peculiar pledge given for its fulfillment: The zeal of the Lord of Hosts, it is declared, shall perform this! Zeal is a fervid affection of the mind, that prompts us to pursue an object with earnestness and perseverance, and to encounter every difficulty that may stand in the way of its accomplishment. From such a spirit, even in men, much is to be expected. Yet what is the zeal of creatures? Always feeble, often misguided, disproportionate, or declining. But conceive of it as possessing the heart of the omnipotent God. What an overwhelming thought! The establishment of Christ’s kingdom deeply interests him: his thoughts are upon it; all his plans include it; and all that is going on in the world, from generation to generation, is made to subserve it. We draw some encouragement from the zeal of creatures in God’s cause. When his servants take pleasure in the stones of Zion, and favour the dust thereof, we consider it a hopeful symptom that the Lord is about to arise and have mercy upon it. The importunity and liberality of Christians, the diligence of ministers, and the cries of the souls from under the altar, for the fall of Babylon, may have each their influence: but the zeal of the Lord of Hosts surpasses all. Here is solid rock, for faith to rest upon.

Rev. Andrew Fuller-God’s Approbation of our Labours Necessary to the Hope of Success-Preached

God is Unchanging in His Promises

God is unchanging in his promises. Ah! we love to speak about the sweet promises of God; but if we could ever suppose that one of them could be changed, we would not talk anything more about them. If I thought that the notes of the bank of England could not be cashed next week, I should decline to take them, and if I thought that God’s promises would never be fulfilled it I thought that God would see it right to alter some word in his promises-farewell Scriptures! I want immutable things: and I find that I have immutable promises when I turn to the Bible: for, “by two immutable things in which it is impossible for God to lie,” he hath signed, confirmed, and sealed every promise of his. The gospel is not “yea and nay,” it is not promising to-day, and denying to-morrow, but the gospel is “yea, yea,” to the glory of God.

Charles H. Spurgeon-The Immutability of God- A Sermon January 7, 1855