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Posts Tagged ‘R. C. Sproul’

What Is the Unpardonable Sin?

By R. C. Sproul

“Assuredly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the sons of men, and whatever blasphemies they may utter; but he who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is subject to eternal condemnation” (Mark 3:28–29).

I cannot tell you how many times in my teaching career very distraught Christians have come to me to ask about the unpardonable sin and whether they might have committed it. I suspect most believers have asked themselves whether they have done something unforgivable. It is not surprising that many people struggle with this issue because the precise nature of “the unpardonable sin” is difficult to discern and many theories about it have been set forth through church history. For instance, some people have argued that the unpardonable sin is murder and others have said that it is adultery, because they see the serious consequences that those sins wreak on the sanctity of life and the sanctity of marriage. But I can speak with full assurance that neither of those sins is unpardonable. There are two reasons for my assurance. First, Scripture shows us examples of people who committed these sins and were forgiven. Exhibit A is David, who was guilty of both adultery and murder, and yet, after his confession and repentance, he was restored fully to his state…..

 

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Stream for Free: 2017 Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College

January 30, 2017 2 comments

You can now stream all the messages from last week’s Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College for free on Ligonier.org, the Ligonier app, and YouTube.

Preaching God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Haykin

Living God’s Word: The Life of Augustine by Stephen Nichols

God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Kruger

Questions & Answers with Haykin, Kruger, Nichols, and Sproul

Generosity in the Early Church by David Briones

Heresy in the Early Church by Keith Mathison

The Reformation & the Early Church by John Tweeddale

We’re thankful for the partnership of Ligonier Ministries in hosting this conference at Reformation Bible College. We encourage you to learn more about their numerous upcoming conferences and study opportunities in 2017.

Source [Ligonier Ministries]

The Threefold Use of the Law

October 28, 2015 2 comments

by R.C. Sproul

Every Christian wrestles with the question, how does the Old Testament law relate to my life? Is the Old Testament law irrelevant to Christians or is there some sense in which we are still bound by portions of it? As the heresy of antinomianism becomes ever more pervasive in our culture, the need to answer these questions grows increasingly urgent.

The Reformation was founded on grace and not upon law. Yet the law of God was not repudiated by the Reformers. John Calvin, for example, wrote what has become known as the “Threefold Use of the Law” in order to show the importance of the law for the Christian life.1

 

 

 

Read this short article here.

 

A Tribute to R.C. Sproul

September 21, 2015 2 comments

rcsproul.jpgMy comment: R. C. Sproul has been one of the primary factors in the resurgence of Reformed Theology in American Evangelicalism. I personally cut my teeth on Reformed Theology through the ministry of R. C. Sproul and can truly identify with much in this article. That being the case, I figured I would reblog this post, in order to pay tribute to R. C. Sproul.

 

by Nicholas T. Batzig

When I was a young boy, I distinctly remember sitting in the living rooms of various families of the churches we attended–watching VHS tapes of Dr. R.C. Sproul. At this time, that was an innovative way to be fed spiritually–to say the least. To have one of the great theologians of the 20th Century on your television in your living room was a big deal back then. Dr. Sproul was one of the first Reformed ministers to use VHS tapes when they were still somewhat untested and experimental mediums. Add to this the numerous R.C. Sproul cassette tapes that lay around our home. R.C. Sproul’s name and ministry was far from foreign in our family in the late 70’s and early 80’s. Tabletalk Magazine was also a common sight in the Batzig home. I would frequently see my mom carrying out her morning devotions with a Bible, Tabletalk Magazine and a cup of coffee. These are some of the early memories of the formative influence that R.C. Sproul had on me as a young boy.

 

 

 

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Sola Scriptura is not Solo Scriptura

“It seems odd, that certain men who talk so much of what the Holy Spirit reveals to themselves, should think so little of what he has revealed to others.” – C. H. Spurgeon, Commenting and Commentaries (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1876), 1.

“Tradition is the fruit of the Spirit’s teaching activity from the ages as God’s people have sought understanding of Scripture. It is not infallible, but neither is it negligible, and we impoverish ourselves if we disregard it.” – J.I. Packer, “Upholding the Unity of Scripture Today,” JETS 25 (1982): 414

“Although tradition does not rule our interpretation, it does guide it. If upon reading a particular passage you have come up with an interpretation that has escaped the notice of every other Christian for two-thousand years, or has been championed by universally recognized heretics, chances are pretty good that you had better abandon your interpretation.” – R. C. Sproul

“The best way to guard a true interpretation of Scripture, the Reformers insisted, was neither to naively embrace the infallibility of tradition, or the infallibility of the individual, but to recognize the communal interpretation of Scripture. The best way to ensure faithfulness to the text is to read it together, not only with the churches of our own time and place, but with the wider ‘communion of saints’ down through the age.” – Michael Horton, “What Still Keeps Us Apart?”


 

 

“Sola Scriptura” is not the same as “Solo Scriptura”. A proper understanding of “Sola Scriptura” will not lead to an individualistic, “me and my Bible in the woods” approach to Bible interpretation. Because of Christ’s gifts to the Church through the centuries, we have the privilege of standing on the shoulders of giants. –Phil Johnson

 

 

 

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Why Sola Scriptura is Crucial to Evangelicalism

by Dr. R. C. Sproul

“The only source and norm of all Christian knowledge is the Holy Scripture.” This thematic statement introduces De Scriptura Sacra of Heinrich Heppe’s classic work in Reformed dogmatics and provides a succinct expression of the Reformation slogan: Sola Scriptura (Scripture Alone). The two key words that are used to crystallize the sola character of Scripture are source and norm.

The Reformation principle of Sola Scriptura was given the status of the formal cause of the Reformation by Melanchthon and his Lutheran followers. The formal cause was distinguished from the material cause of Sola Fide (by faith alone). Though the chief theological issue of the Reformation was the question of the matter of justification, the controversy touched heavily on the underlying question of authority. As is usually the case in theological controversy, the issue of ultimate authority lurked in the background (though it was by no means hidden or obscure) of Luther’s struggle with Rome over justification. The question of the source of Luther’s doctrine and the normative authority by which it was to be judged was vital to his cause.

 

 

 

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Download part of the book ‘Scripture Alone’ as a Pdf.

Tabletalk-What N. T. Wright Really Said

April 27, 2015 1 comment