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God’s people are a people who are not of the world

November 10, 2014 1 comment

Spurgeon 6“They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.” — John 17:16.

 

I. First, we shall take our text and look at it DOCTRINALLY.

The doctrine of it is, that God’s people are a people who are not of the world, even as Christ was not of the world. It is not so much that they are not of the world, as that they are “not of the world, even as Christ was not of the world.” This is an important distinction, for there are to be found certain people who are not of the world, and yet they are not Christians. Amongst them I would mention sentimentalists — people who are always crying and groaning in affected sentimental ways. Their spirits are so refined, their characters are so delicate, that they could not attend to ordinary business. They would think it rather degrading to their spiritual nature to attend to anything connected with the world. They live much in the air of romances and novels; love to read things that fetch tears from their eyes; they would like continually to live in a cottage near a wood, or to inhabit some quiet cave, where they could read “Zimmerman on Solitude” for ever; for they feel that they are “not of the world.” The fact is, there is something too flimsy about them to stand the wear and tear of this wicked world. They are so pre-eminently good, that they cannot bear to do as we poor human creatures do I have heard of one young lady, who thought herself so spiritually-minded that she could not work. A very wise minister said to her, “That is quite correct! you are so spiritually-minded that you cannot work; very well, you are so spiritually-minded that you shall not eat unless you do.” That brought her back from her great spiritual-mindedness. There is a stupid sentimentalism that certain persons nurse themselves into. They read a parcel of books that intoxicate their brains, and then fancy that they have a lofty destiny. These people are “not of the world,” truly; but the world does not want them, and the world would not miss them much, if they were clean gone for ever. There is such a thing as being “not of the world,” from high order of sentimentalism, and yet not being a Christian after all. For it is not so much being “not of the world,” as being “not of the world, even as Christ was not of the world.” There are others, too, like your monks, and those other mad individuals of the Catholic church, who are not of the world. They are so awfully good, that they could not live with us sinful creatures at ale. They must be distinguished from us altogether. They must not wear, of course, a boot that would at all approach to a worldly shoe, but they must have a sole of leather strapped on with two or three thongs, like the far famed Father Ignatius. They could not be expected to wear worldly coats and waistcoats; but they must have peculiar garbs, cut in certain fashions, like the Passionists. They must wear particular dresses, particular garments, particular habits. And we know that some men are “not of the world” by the peculiar mouthing they give to all their words — the sort of sweet, savory, buttery flavor they give to the English language, because they think themselves so eminently sanctified that they fancy it would be wrong to indulge in anything in which ordinary mortals indulge. Such persons are, however, reminded, that their being “not of the world,” has nothing to do with it. It is not being “not of the world,” so much as being “not of the world, even as Christ was not of the world.”

Charles H. Spurgeon-The Character of Christ’s People-Delivered on Sabbath Morning,
November 22, 1855

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Confession statement 33

Published in 1646

The Text used: There has been some updating of Old English words but otherwise no changes have been made to the original texts.

CONFESSION OF FAITH of seven congregations or churches of Christ in London. which are commonly, but unjustly, called Anabaptists; published for the vindication of the truth and information of the ignorant; likewise for the taking off those aspersions which are frequently, both in pulpit and print, unjustly cast upon them. Printed in London, Anno 1646.

XXXIII. JESUS Christ hath here on earth a spiritual kingdom, which is His Church, whom He hath purchased and redeemed to Himself as a peculiar inheritance; which Church is a company of visible saints, called and separated from the world by the word and Spirit of God, to the visible profession of faith of the gospel, being baptized into that faith, and joined to the Lord, and each other, by mutual agreement in the practical enjoyment of the ordinances commanded by Christ their head and king.

Matt.11:11; 2 Thess.1:1; 1 Cor.1:2; Eph.1:1; Rom.1:7; Acts 19:8,9,26:18; 2 Cor.6:17; Rev.18:4; Acts 2:37,10:37; Rom.10:10; Matt.18:19.20; Acts 2:42, 9:26; 1 Pet.2:5

The First London Baptist Confession 1644/46 

Confession statement 6

December 26, 2012 Leave a comment

Published in 1646

The Text used: There has been some updating of Old English words but otherwise no changes have been made to the original texts.

CONFESSION OF FAITH of seven congregations or churches of Christ in London. which are commonly, but unjustly, called Anabaptists; published for the vindication of the truth and information of the ignorant; likewise for the taking off those aspersions which are frequently, both in pulpit and print, unjustly cast upon them. Printed in London, Anno 1646.

VI. ALL the elect being loved of God with an everlasting love, are redeemed, quickened, and saved, not by themselves, nor their own works, lest any any man should boast, but, only and wholly by God, of His own free grace and mercy, through Jesus Christ, who is made unto us by God, wisdom, righteousness, sanctification, and redemption, and all in all, that he that rejoiceth, might rejoice in the Lord.

Jer.31:2; Eph.1:3,7, 2:8,9; 1 Thess.5:9; Acts 13:38; 2 Cor.5:21; Jer.9:23.24; 1 Cor.1:30.31; Jer.23:6.

The First London Baptist Confession 1644/46

Chapter VIII : Of Christ the Mediator

1. It pleased God in his eternal purpose, to chuse and ordain the Lord Jesus his only begotten Son, according to the Covenant made between them both, (a) to be the Mediator between God and Man; the (b) Prophet, (c) Priest and (d) King; Head and Saviour of his Church, the heir of all things, and judge of the world: Unto whom he did from all Eternity (e) give a people to be his seed, and to be by him in time redeemed, called, justified, sanctified, and glorified.

a Is. 42.1. 1 Pet. 1.19,20.

b Act. 3.22.

c Heb. 5.5,6.

d Ps. 2.6, Luk. 1.33 Eph. 1.23 Heb. 1.2. Act. 17.31

e Is. 53.10. Joh. 17.6. Rom.8:30.

2. The Son of God, the second Person in the Holy Trinity, being very and eternal God, the brightness of the Fathers glory, of one substance and equal with him: who made the World, who upholdeth and governeth all things he hath made: did when the fullness of time was come take unto him (f) mans nature, with all the Essential properties, and common infirmities thereof, (g) yet without sin: being conceived by the Holy Spirit in the Womb of the Virgin Mary, the Holy Spirit coming down upon her, and the power of the most High overshadowing her, (h) and so was made of a Woman, of the Tribe of Judah, of the Seed of Abraham, and David according to the Scriptures: So that two whole, perfect, and distinct natures, were inseparably joined together in one Person: without conversion, composition, or confusion: which Person is very God, and very Man; yet one (i) Christ, the only Mediator between God and Man.

f Joh. 1.1.14. Gal. 4.4.

g Rom. 8.3. Heb. 2.14.16,17. ch. 4.15.

h Luk. 1.27,31.35.

i Rom. 9.5. 1 Tim. 2.5.

3. The Lord Jesus in his humane nature thus united to the divine, in the Person of the Son, was sanctified, & anointed (k) with the Holy Spirit, above measure; having in him (l) all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge; in whom it pleased the Father that (m) all fullness should dwell: To the end that being (n) holy, harmless, undefiled, and full (o) of Grace, and Truth, he might be throughly furnished to execute the office of a Mediator, and (p) Surety; which office he took not upon himself, but was thereunto (q) called by his Father; who also put (r) all power and judgement in his hand, and gave him Commandement to execute the same.

k Ps. 45.7. Act. 10.38 Joh. 3.34.

l Col. 2.3.

m Col. 1.19.

n Heb. 7.26.

o Joh. 1.14.

p Heb. 7.22.

q Heb. 5.5.

r Joh. 5.22.27. Mat. 28.18. Act. 2.36.

4. This office the Lord Jesus did most (s) willingly undertake, which that he might discharge he was made under the Law, (t) and did perfectly fulfill it, and underwent the (u) punishment due to us, which we should have born and suffered, being made (x) Sin and a Curse for us: enduring most grievous sorrows (y) in his Soul; and most painful sufferings in his body; was crucified, and died, and remained in the state of the dead; yet saw no (z) corruption: on the (a) third day he arose from the dead, with the same (b) body in which he suffered; with which he also (c) ascended into heaven: and there sitteth at the right hand of his Father, (d) making intercession; and shall (e) return to judge Men and Angels, at the end of the World.

s Ps. 40.7,8. Heb. 10.5-11. Joh. 10.18.

t Gal. 4 4. Mat. 3.15.

u Gal. 3.13. Isa. 53.6. 1 Pet. 3.18.

x 2 Cor. 5 21.

y Mat. 26.37,38. Luk. 22.44. Mat. 27.46.

z Act. 13.37.

a 1 Cor. 15.3,4.

b Joh. 20.25.27.

c Mark 16 19. Act. 1.9,10,11.

d Rom. 8.34. Heb. 9.24

e Act. 10.42. Rom. 14.9,10. Act. 1.10. [It appears that the reference to Act_1:10 in the original manuscript is an error. Most modern editions have Act_1:11, which seems more relevant.]

5. The Lord Jesus by his perfect obedience and sacrifice of himself, which he through the Eternal Spirit once offered up unto God, (f) hath fully satisfied the Justice of God, procured reconciliation, and purchased an Everlasting inheritance in the Kingdom of Heaven, (g) for all those whom the Father hath given unto him.

f  Heb. 9.14. ch. 10.14.Rom. 3.25,26.

g Joh. 17.2. Heb. 9.15.

6. Although the price of Redemption was not actually paid by Christ, till after his Incarnation, (*) yet the vertue, efficacy, and benefit thereof were communicated to the Elect in all ages successively, from the beginning of the World, in and by those Promises, Types, and Sacrifices, wherein he was revealed, and signified to be the Seed of the Woman, which should bruise the Serpents head; (h) and the Lamb slain from the foundation of the World: (i) Being the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever.

* 1 Cor. 4.10. Heb. 4.2. 1 Pet. 1.10,11.

h Rev. 13.8.

i Heb. 13.8.

7. Christ in the work of Mediation acteth according to both natures, by each nature doing that which is proper to it self; yet by reason of the Unity of the Person, that which is proper to one nature, is sometimes in Scripture attributed to the Person (k) denominated by the other nature.

k Joh. 3.13. Act. 20.28.

8. To all those for whom Christ hath obtained eternal redemption, he doth certainly, and effectually (l) apply, and communicate the same; making intercession for them, uniting them to himself by his spirit, (m) revealing unto them, in and by the word, the mystery of salvation; perswading them to believe, and obey; (n) governing their hearts by his word and spirit, and (o) overcoming all their enemies by his Almighty power, and wisdom; in such manner, and wayes as are most consonant to his wonderful, and (p) unsearchable dispensation; and all of free, and absolute Grace, without any condition foreseen in them, to procure it.

l Joh. 6.37. ch. 10.15.16. & ch. 17.9.Rom. 5.10.

m Joh. 17.6, Eph. 1.9. 1 Joh. 5.20.

n Rom. 8.9.14.

o Ps. 110.1. 1 Cor. 15.25,26.

p Joh. 3.8 Eph. 1.8.

9. This office of Mediator between God and Man, is proper (q) onely to Christ, who is the Prophet, Priest, and King of the Church of God; and may not be either in whole, or any part thereof transfer’d from him to any other.

q 1 Tim. 2.5.

10. This number and order of Offices is necessary; for in respect of our (r) ignorance, we stand in need of his prophetical Office; and in respect of our alienation from God, (s) and imperfection of the best of our services, we need his Priestly office, to reconcile us, and present us acceptable unto God: and in respect o our averseness, and utter inability to return to God, and for our rescue, and security from our spiritual adversaries, we need his Kingly office, (t) to convince, subdue, draw, uphold, deliver, and preserve us to his Heavenly Kingdome.

r Joh. 1.18.

s Col. 1.21. Gal. 5.17.

t Joh. 16.8. Ps. 110.3 Luk. 1.74.75.

The 1677/89LondonBaptist Confession

Concerning our Christian Life

Christians should be grave and serious, though cheerful and pleasant. They should feel that they have great interests at stake, and that the world has too. They are redeemed—not to make sport; purchased with precious blood—for other purposes than to make men laugh. They are soon to be in heaven—and a man who has any impressive sense of that will habitually feel he has much else to do than to make men laugh. The true course of life is midway between moroseness and levity; sourness and lightness; harshness and jesting. Be benevolent, kind, cheerful, bland, courteous—but serious. Be solemn, thoughtful, deeply impressed with the presence of God and with eternal things—but pleasant affable and benignant. Think not a smile sinful; but think not levity and jesting harmless.

Albert Barnes

Thinking about God’s Graciousness

January 23, 2012 3 comments

As I sit here and think about what I have in Christ, I rejoice. God has forgiven my sins, clothed me with Christ righteousness, and seated me in the heavens in Christ. I was a beggar, a poor wretch, who needed saving. Why did the God of all grace reach down and decide to save this wretch? I do not mean to exalt my wretchedness above God’s grace. O but no that is not my intent. Yet I can look over my life and see that I was not worthy for the God of all grace to save.

Nevertheless this is what glorifies God. This is what exalts him as the Supreme Being of this universe. He is the only one who can take a filthy vessel and make it white as snow. He is the only and true Potter that can make a broken vessel over again. If it were not for his great mercy, where would I be? Better yet, if it were not for his great mercy, where would any of us be? All that have received his grace knows the answer to this. Hell would be our abode for eternity.

Therefore I want too say with the Psalmist this morning,

“So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.” Psalms 90:12

 To many times we get caught up with the things of this life and forget that we need to seek God. We forget the great gifts he has given us and forget to be thankful and to apply our hearts to wisdom. Therefore let us apply our hearts to wisdom, so that we may have an abundant entrance into God’s presence.

This is my hearts desire as I go into this New Year with my upgraded means of communicating the Gospel. I pray that it is your desire as well.

God bless,

Hershel Lee Harvell Jr.

Prayer Should be Natural to the Converted

Prayer is as natural an expression of faith as breathing is of life.

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)