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Posts Tagged ‘Remorse’

The Wednesday Word: I Confess

I confess

That I am a great sinner, but Jesus is an even greater Saviour. (Ephesians 2: 8-9).

I confess

That I need a Saviour and that Jesus is the Saviour I need (2 Timothy 1:10).

I confess

I am guilty, prone to wander but, by the Gospel, I am justified freely by His grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus (Romans 3:24).

I confess

I had ruined myself by sin, and, apart from grace, I would stand exposed to divine retribution. But I rejoice in the Gospel because by the Gospel I continually learn that Jesus was made (reckoned) sin for me, that I might be made (reckoned) the righteousness of God in Him (2 Corinthians 5:21).

I confess

I am now a child of God.

Because of the Gospel, I am made alive, adopted, justified, accepted, and clothed in righteousness. ” God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6: 14).

I confess

I have been raised from spiritual death. Spiritually speaking, my filthy garments of sin are taken off and new robes of righteousness, white, clean and beautiful, put on (Zechariah 3:3-4, Isaiah 61:10).

I confess

Now that I am saved, I will “Set my affection on things above where Christ is” (Colossians 3: 2). He is precious. I will purpose to enjoy Him today and every day.

I confess

That Jesus is with me 24 hours per day for He said, “I am with you always, even unto the end of the world” (Matthew 28: 3). Even when I neglect to seek Him, even when I don´t think of Him, He is with me. He is the Master of all grace. I am continually with Him. I cannot be where He is not. There is no separation (Romans 8:38-39).

I confess

That I am, “Kept by the power of God” (1 Peter 1: 5).

I cannot keep myself. The pull of the world the flesh and the devil are too strong for me. But I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. “I will not be afraid of tens of thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about” (Psalm 3:6). “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” (Psalm 27: 1). He will keep me unto salvation.

I confess

The Lord has promised that “In the secret of His tabernacle shall He hide me” (Psalm 27: 5). In the time of danger, He will hide me in His dwelling place and defend me. He will situate me in a place inaccessible to my enemies.

I confess

That God Himself is with me as my Captain (2 Chronicles 13:12). As you lead me Oh Lord, I acknowledge that you are in charge.

I confess

I have a High Priest who can be touched with the feeling of my infirmities (Hebrews 4:15). Lord Jesus, you know about my sickness and sorrow. You stand in my shoes. You understand the struggles that come as a part of this wretched human condition.

I confess

That “In Thee Lord do I put my trust” (Psalm 16:1).

I have no one else to trust. Whom can I trust with my eternal destiny but you? You have promised eternal life to your sheep. You have died in my place and risen from the grave. I put my trust in you.

I confess

That you are coming back for me (John 14:3). There is a soon coming day that is called the Day of the Lord. My hope is centered in You Lord Jesus, the God-man. Thy Kingdom Come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven.

And that´s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com  

Chapter 33-Repentance

August 13, 2014 1 comment

Repentance

The Scripture doctrine of Repentance is to be learned in part from the meaning of the original Greek word used to express it, and in part from its application to a matter which is within the sphere of morals.

I. There are two forms of words used in the New Testament which are translated repent and repentance.

Only one of these is used of the repentance associated with salvation from sin. This is the verb metanoeo, and the corresponding noun metanoia. The other verb is metamelomai, the noun of which does not appear in the New Testament, but occurs in the Septuagint in Hosea 11:8. The verb is used in the Septuagint in Psalm 110:4; and Jer. 20:16. It is also the word used in the New Testament in Matt. 21:29, which says of the son who had refused to obey his father’s command to work in the vineyard, “afterward he repented himself and went.” It likewise is found in Matt. 21:32 and 27:3, this latter being the case of Judas. Paul uses it in Rom. 11:29; and 2 Cor. 7:8, 10. It is also the word used in Heb. 7:21. In all other places, translated repent and repentance in the New Testament, the original is metanoeo or metanoia. This word means to reconsider, to perceive afterwards, and hence to change one’s view, mind, or purpose, or even judgement, implying disapproval and abandonment of past opinions and purposes, and the adoption of others which are different. In all cases of inward change there is not necessarily a change of outward conduct, nor is such inward change accompanied by regret. These results would flow from the nature of that about which that change has arisen.

We arrive, therefore, at the meaning of Christian repentance partly through the meaning of these Greek words, but also partly because it is exercised about a question of morals. It is seen that it involves a change in the outward life because such change is a result of the change of inward opinions. It also includes sorrow for sin because a change of view as to the nature of sin and of holiness must be accompanied by regret and sorrow as to the past acts of sin.

The word metamelomai means to change one’s care, to regret; the idea of sorrow always accompanying it.

The two words are nearly synonymous in their secondary meaning, and each is used in this secondary meaning in the New Testament. Metanoeo, however, traces the feeling of sorrow and the change of life back to an inward change of opinion and judgement as to the nature of sin and holiness, and of the relations of man and God. It is perhaps on this account that it is exclusively used for true repentance in the New Testament. This is not simply sorrow, or remorse, which may pass away, or lead in despair to other sins, or fill the soul with anxiety’ but a heartfelt change in the inward soul towards God and holiness, which is lasting and effective, and which may be associated with peace and joy in believing.

II. To set forth explicitly what Christian Repentance is, it may be stated that it includes

1. An intellectual and spiritual perception of the opposition between holiness in God and sin in man. It does not look at sin as the cause of punishment but abhors it because it is vile in the sight of God and involves in heinous guilt all who are sinners.

2. It consequently includes sorrow and self-loathing, and earnest desire to escape the evil of sin. The penitent soul does not so much feel the greatness of its danger as the greatness of its sinfulness.

3. It also includes an earnest turning to God for help and deliverance from sin, seeking pardon for guilt and aid to escape its presence.

It is also accompanied by deep regret because of the sins committed in the past, and by determination with God’s help to avoid sin and live in holiness hereafter. The heart heretofore against God and for sin is now against sin and for God.

From these facts it will be seen that

(1.) The seat of true repentance is in the soul. It is not of itself the mere intellectual knowledge of sin, nor the sorrow that accompanies it, nor the changed life which flows from it; but it is the soul’s apprehension of its heinous character, which begets the horror and self-loathing which accompany it, and the determination to forsake sin which flows from it.

(2.) That true repentance is inconsistent with the continuance in sin because of grace abounding.

(3.) That true repentance consists of mental and spiritual emotion, and not of outward self-imposed chastisements. Even the pious life and devotion to God which follow are described not as repentance, but as fruits meet for repentance.

III. The Scriptures teach that the author of true repentance is God operating by truth upon the renewed heart.

Acts 5:31. Christ is said to have been exalted “to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.”

Acts 11:18. “Then to the Gentiles also hath God granted repentance unto life.”

The means used is the preaching and other exhibition of the truth. Repentance like faith comes through the hearing of the word. By this men are exhorted to that duty, and gain the knowledge of the truths taught by God, through spiritual apprehension of which men are led to the truth.

 

Rev. James Petigru Boyce, D. D., LL. D.,–Abstract of Systematic Theology–First published in 1887

The Deeps

February 26, 2014 1 comment

Lord Jesus, give me a deeper repentance, a horror of sin, a dread of its approach. Help me chastely to flee it and jealously to resolve that my heart shall be Thine alone.

Give me a deeper trust, that I may lose myself to find myself in Thee, the ground of my rest, the spring of my being. Give me a deeper knowledge of Thyself as saviour, master, lord, and king. Give me deeper power in private prayer, more sweetness in Thy Word, more steadfast grip on its truth. Give me deeper holiness in speech, thought, action, and let me not seek moral virtue apart from Thee.

Plough deep in me, great Lord, heavenly husbandman, that my being may be a tilled field, the roots of grace spreading far and wide, until Thou alone art seen in me, Thy beauty golden like summer harvest, Thy fruitfulness as autumn plenty.

I have no master but Thee, no law but Thy will, no delight but Thyself, no wealth but that Thou givest, no good but that Thou blessest, no peace but that Thou bestowest. I am nothing but that Thou makest me. I have nothing but that I receive from Thee. I can be nothing but that grace adorns me. Quarry me deep, dear Lord, and then fill me to overflowing with living water.

 

Taken from The Valley of Vision: A Collection of Puritan Prayers & Devotions, edited by Arthur Bennett. Reformatted by Eternal Life Ministries.