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Posts Tagged ‘Sola Scriptura’

Reaffirming Sola Scriptura

by Tom Nettles

Sola Scriptura as Philip Schaff indicated, confessions and creeds hold no absolute authority for Protestants. Their authority is only an ad hoc, ecclesial, and localized standard for the sake of unity in fellowship and consistency of witness either in a denomination or a local assembly of believers. They can be amended or expanded in light of evidence from more mature biblical exegesis or in light of doctrinal and cultural challenges to biblical truth. For this reason, confessions arising from within Protestantism usually contain an article that affirms the sole authority, inspiration and infallible authority of Scripture. For example, the Second London Confession of the Baptists stated in its first sentence, “The Holy Scripture is the only sufficient, certain, and infallible rule of all saving knowledge, Faith, and Obedience.” In paragraph 6 of the same article on Scripture, reflecting the words and concepts of both the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Savoy Declaration with one slight variation [italicized], the confession added: “The whole Councel of God concerning all things necessary for his own Glory, Man’s Salvation, Faith and Life, is either expressly set down or necessarily contained in the Holy Scripture; unto which nothing at any time is to be added, whether by new Revelation of the Spirit, or traditions of men.” Thus, one of the most influential confessions in Protestantism begins with a ten paragraph article affirming the sole and certain authority of Scripture closing with these words: “The supreme judge by which all controversies of Religion are to be determined, and all Decrees of Councils, opinions of ancient Writers, Doctrines of men, and private Spirits, are to be examined, and in whose sentence we are to rest, can be no other but the Holy Spirit speaking in the Scripture” [WCF]. Again, the Second London Confession varied the language slightly, insisting even more clearly on the sole authority of Scripture, closing with the phrase after the words “can be no other,” with these words, “but the Holy Scripture delivered by the Spirit, into which Scripture so delivered, our faith is finally resolved.”

For Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, however, the view of the creedal tradition is quite different. The Orthodox churches consider the first seven ecumenical councils as guided by the Holy Spirit resulting…

 

 

 

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Another example of a failure to interpret Scripture properly

Arthur PinkAnother example of failure at this point is the frequent use made of Galatians 6:15, “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature” (or “new creation”). It is most proper and pertinent to use that verse when showing that neither the ceremonial ordinances of Judaism nor the baptism and Lord’s supper of Christianity are of any worth in rendering us meet for the inheritance of the saints in light. So too, though much less frequently, we are reminded that,

“For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision; but faith which worketh by love” (Galatians 5:6),

that is out of gratitude to God for His unspeakable Gift, and not from legal motives—only for what they may obtain. But how very rarely does the pulpit quote

“Circumcision is nothing, and uncircumcision is nothing, but the keeping of the commandments of God” (1 Corinthians 7:19)

—that which respects our submission to the Divine authority, our walking in subjection to God’s will, is omitted. It is only by placing these three verses side by side that we obtain a balanced view. We are not vitally united to Christ unless we have been born again; we are not born again unless we possess a faith that works by love; and we have not this saving faith unless it be evidenced by a keeping of God’s commandments.

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Roman Catholic Apologists: an Hour Long Phone Call in Response to Rome’s Claims

By James White

Took a phone call from 18-year-old Luke who has been talking to some Roman Catholic apologists—spent the entire hour with Luke addressing issues like sola scriptura, apostolic succession, the gospel, grace, justification—we about covered it all! Should be helpful to many!

 
Download the audio here.

 

 

Source [Alpha Omega Ministries]

Free Ebook- Baptism and Covenant Theology by Walter Chantry

December 18, 2015 Leave a comment

No Baptist begins to seek an answer to the question “Who should be baptized?” by studying the Bible’s doctrine of the covenants. Rather, he begins with New Testament texts which deal directly with the term “baptize.” In a later study of Covenant Theology, he finds confirmation and undergirding of his conclusions.

In the New Testament, we discover the nature of baptism defined. In the definition, something must be said about the person baptized. Its central significance is that the one baptized is said to be savingly joined to Christ. We agree that the definition in the Westminster Confession of Faith is essentially biblical:

“Baptism is a sacrament of the New Testament, ordained by Jesus Christ, not only for the solemn admission of the party baptized into the visible church, but also to be unto him a sign and seal of the covenant of grace, of his ingrafting into Christ, of regeneration, of remission of sins, and of his giving up unto God through Jesus Christ, to walk in newness of life . . . ” (Chapter XXVIII).

 

Download the ebook here. There is also a Spanish version here.

 

Source [ARBCA]

Don’t Put God in a Box

by Erik Raymond

When you read the NT you see the demonstration and description of miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit. Right away on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2) the people are speaking in tongues. Not long after we see the dead raised, lame healed, and people transported. It is a powerful outbreaking of the Holy Spirit in an arresting way.

When you read these things (and their corresponding descriptions, instructions, and warnings) a Christian must ask if these so-called miraculous gifts are operative today (i.e. the gifts of tongues, healing, & prophecy). Do we today see the same types of things happening as we did in the early chapters of Acts?

 

 

 

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Sufficiency of the Scriptures – the New Battle for the Bible

I still remember, as a teen, listening to a sermon about the Gerasene demoniac from Mark 5. It’s an amazing story detailing Christ’s power over the spiritual forces of darkness and ability to deliver men from their devilish grip. But you would have never known that from the sermon I was hearing. My childhood pastor, a graduate of a SBC seminary, argued away any supernatural element and declared this event was nothing more than Jesus attacking the social injustice of his day.

According to my pastor, Jesus wasn’t interacting with an actual demon who possessed this man, as the text so clearly states, but simply a man who had been driven to insanity after being robbed of all self-dignity in his society. This poor man no longer saw himself as a valuable individual. Therefore, when Jesus asked for his name, he simply answered, “My name is Legion: for we are many.” Translated: “I am just a nobody numbered among the masses of society.” Who had brought this unjust plight upon this man? Simply put, it was the corporate pig farmers who had used men like him to line their pockets with profit. Therefore, Jesus destroyed the source of their profit by driving their commodity into the sea and bringing His judgment upon those capitalistic pigs.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Scripture Alone

scriptalone265Exploring the Bible’s Accuracy, Authority and Authenticity by James White

 

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Scripture Alone – Exploring the Bible’s Accuracy, Authority and Authenticity by James R. White

A Passionate Introduction to the Sufficiency of the Bible

If God’s Word is to be heard, we who love it must stand in its defense, says James R. White in his introduction to Scripture Alone. With clear teaching in an engaging, accessible style, this book lays a foundation for all Christians who desire a deeper understanding of biblical sufficiency. White presents Scripture as God-breathed in nature, as unparalleled and absolute in authority, and as the church’s infallible rule of faith in straightforward language to help believers apply these doctrines to their lives. In addition he addresses the timely issues of the canon, including textual and historical evidence.

The captivating dialogues used throughout the book help bring into focus the great truths of faith against the backdrop of error. Based on the author’s experience in public debates against leading apologists of varying ideology, they assist readers in discovering how to engage in conversation with those of differing beliefs.

“The Word comes first, and with the Word the Spirit breathes upon my heart so that I believe.” – Martin Luther

Author Information

James R. White is the author of several acclaimed books, including The King James Only Controversy and The Forgotten Trinity. He is an elder of the Phoenix Reformed Baptist Church, director of Alpha and Omega Ministries, a Christian apologetics organization, an adjunct professor with Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, and a professor of apologetics with Columbia Evangelical Seminary. He and his family live in Phoenix.

Reviews:

“Scripture Alone by James R. White had me hooked at the Dedication page. The heart for Christ that is briefly exposed there is more full expressed in the subsequent pages. White states in his Introduction that he is passionate about theology and faith, and that passion is clear throughout the book. The Introduction also contains a helpful clarification of sola scriptura (and sola fide), which is laid out in more detail in Chapter 2; there are several useful historical references as well. Chapter 2 concludes with an assessment of the evangelical church’s view of Scripture and preaching, in theory and in practice.

This is a book that is written for the layman, but I confess to getting a bit bogged down in Chapter 5, a discussion of the canon of Scripture. I am confident that this is a problem that can be easily overcome by a slower, more careful reading on my part. Throughout the book, White employs a dialogue technique that proves helpful in most places, but occasionally gets tedious. Chapter 6 provides a good preview of material that most Christians have not read firsthand in their entirety, but may have had to deal with recently because of the popularity of The Da Vinci Code. Though not primarily a rebuttal to that book, it is helpful. Chapter 7 has an excellent imaginary debate between a Christian and a Mormon about text corruption, as well as a transcript of an actual debate between White and a Muslim that was wonderful. White also addressed one of my pet peeves in ‘The Lord spoke to me, saying…’ However, the ending he portrays with George happily agreeing to consider Joshua’s points has been a rarity in my experience.

In his conclusion, White reiterates his goal, to stir up a passion in the believer for the Word of God and it’s sufficiency. He exhorts the reader to continued study, and to a renewed zeal for meditation on the Scriptures. It would be impossible to read this book and not be so moved.” –Christian Book Previews

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

Chapter One: Three Arguments Related to Scriptural Sufficiency
Chapter Two: Definitions: More Than Half the Battle
Chapter Three: Forever Settled: The Nature of God’s Holy Word
Chapter Four: Inerrancy and Exegesis: Believing and Honoring God’s Word
Chapter Five: The Canon of Scripture Considered
Chapter Six: Did Thomas Write a Gospel?
Chapter Seven: Allegations of Corruption
Chapter Eight: Allegations of Contradiction
Chapter Nine: Tradition, the Church, and the Development of Doctrine
Chapter Ten: The Lord Spoke to Me, Saying
Chapter Eleven: Scriptural Sufficiency: Nothing New
Chapter Twelve: Conclusion: Forever Settled in Heaven . . . and for Me
Scripture Index

Regular Price: $16.00

Special Price $12.00

Buy the book here.