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Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Nichols’

Stream for Free: 2017 Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College

January 30, 2017 2 comments

You can now stream all the messages from last week’s Winter Conference at Reformation Bible College for free on Ligonier.org, the Ligonier app, and YouTube.

Preaching God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Haykin

Living God’s Word: The Life of Augustine by Stephen Nichols

God’s Word in the Early Church by Michael Kruger

Questions & Answers with Haykin, Kruger, Nichols, and Sproul

Generosity in the Early Church by David Briones

Heresy in the Early Church by Keith Mathison

The Reformation & the Early Church by John Tweeddale

We’re thankful for the partnership of Ligonier Ministries in hosting this conference at Reformation Bible College. We encourage you to learn more about their numerous upcoming conferences and study opportunities in 2017.

Source [Ligonier Ministries]

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London to Philadelphia Correction

Last week I blogged the 5 Minutes in Church History’s audio ‘London to Philadelphia.’ Jason Delgado over at Confessingbaptist.com brought it to my attention that there were several inaccuracies in the history that was presented. Dr. Stephen Nichols admitted that there might have been some inaccuracies.

Here is what I blogged. A link to the corrections of the audio is found below.

by Stephen Nichols

London to Philadelphia—you might think that this has to do with transatlantic flights. Well, it doesn’t. It has to do with confessions of faith—Baptist confessions of faith, to be exact. First, there is the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith, also known as the Second London Baptist Confession, and then there is the Philadelphia Confession of Faith.

The Baptists came into being early in the 1600s in England. These were Puritans. They had all left the Anglican Church and were part of the larger group of people that we call Nonconformists, meaning they would not conform to the established church, the Church of England. These Baptists were not only separated out from the Anglicans, but these Baptists also believed in adult or believer’s baptism, which set them apart from some of the other Nonconformists. It set them apart from the Presbyterians and it set them apart from the Congregationalists.

In 1644, the Baptists gathered together and wrote the First London Baptist Confession. It was very much like the Westminster Standards, but of course it differed in the chapters on church polity or church government and on baptism.

In 1677, they gathered again to refresh this confession and had a number of people sign off on it, but there were also some who couldn’t sign off. This was a time of intense persecution in England, and there were many who were simply not able to align themselves with this statement.

Then came the 1689 Act of Toleration. This act brought a significant measure of religious freedom to England and to the Nonconformists. That very same year, we have the 1689 London Baptist Confession, which was a rehash of the 1644 confession.

In 1707, the Philadelphia Baptist Association was formed. This was a group of Baptists in the New World, in William Penn’s colony. In 1742, the association adopted the 1689 London Confession and made a few minor additions. They added two chapters of one paragraph each. The result was a new document known as the Philadelphia Confession of Faith.

If we go back to the 1689 London Baptist Confession, in the chapter on the church we find these words:

“As each church, and all the members of it, are bound to pray continually for the good and prosperity of all the churches of Christ, in all places, and upon all occasions to further everyone within the bounds of their places and callings, in the exercise of their gifts and graces.”

The men who wrote this document believed in the church. They believed in the church as the institution that God ordained, the institution that He promises to bless, and the institution by which He spreads the fragrance of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In the Philadelphia Confession, one of the chapters that was added is on praise. This is what it says:

“We believe that singing the praises of God, is a holy ordinance of Christ, and not a part of natural religion, or a moral duty only; but that it is brought under divine institution, it being enjoined on the churches of Christ to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs; and that the whole church in their public assemblies (as well as private Christians) ought to sing God’s praises according to the best light they have received. Moreover, it was practiced in the great representative church by our Lord Jesus Christ with His disciples, after He had instituted and celebrated the sacred ordinance of His holy supper, as a commemorative token of redeeming love.”

So from London to Philadelphia, we have the Baptist confessions.

View the post here.

Download the audio here.

A correction to the inaccuracies.

 

 

Source [5 Minutes in Church History]

London to Philadelphia

August 13, 2015 3 comments

by Stephen Nichols

London to Philadelphia—you might think that this has to do with transatlantic flights. Well, it doesn’t. It has to do with confessions of faith—Baptist confessions of faith, to be exact. First, there is the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith, also known as the Second London Baptist Confession, and then there is the Philadelphia Confession of Faith.

The Baptists came into being early in the 1600s in England. These were Puritans. They had all left the Anglican Church and were part of the larger group of people that we call Nonconformists, meaning they would not conform to the established church, the Church of England. These Baptists were not only separated out from the Anglicans, but these Baptists also believed in adult or believer’s baptism, which set them apart from some of the other Nonconformists. It set them apart from the Presbyterians and it set them apart from the Congregationalists.

In 1644, the Baptists gathered together and wrote the First London Baptist Confession. It was very much like the Westminster Standards, but of course it differed in the chapters on church polity or church government and on baptism.

In 1677, they gathered again to refresh this confession and had a number of people sign off on it, but there were also some who couldn’t sign off. This was a time of intense persecution in England, and there were many who were simply not able to align themselves with this statement.

Then came the 1689 Act of Toleration. This act brought a significant measure of religious freedom to England and to the Nonconformists. That very same year, we have the 1689 London Baptist Confession, which was a rehash of the 1644 confession.

In 1707, the Philadelphia Baptist Association was formed. This was a group of Baptists in the New World, in William Penn’s colony. In 1742, the association adopted the 1689 London Confession and made a few minor additions. They added two chapters of one paragraph each. The result was a new document known as the Philadelphia Confession of Faith.

If we go back to the 1689 London Baptist Confession, in the chapter on the church we find these words:

“As each church, and all the members of it, are bound to pray continually for the good and prosperity of all the churches of Christ, in all places, and upon all occasions to further everyone within the bounds of their places and callings, in the exercise of their gifts and graces.”

The men who wrote this document believed in the church. They believed in the church as the institution that God ordained, the institution that He promises to bless, and the institution by which He spreads the fragrance of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In the Philadelphia Confession, one of the chapters that was added is on praise. This is what it says:

“We believe that singing the praises of God, is a holy ordinance of Christ, and not a part of natural religion, or a moral duty only; but that it is brought under divine institution, it being enjoined on the churches of Christ to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs; and that the whole church in their public assemblies (as well as private Christians) ought to sing God’s praises according to the best light they have received. Moreover, it was practiced in the great representative church by our Lord Jesus Christ with His disciples, after He had instituted and celebrated the sacred ordinance of His holy supper, as a commemorative token of redeeming love.”

So from London to Philadelphia, we have the Baptist confessions.

View the post here.

Download the audio here.

 

Source [5 Minutes in Church History]

2014 Regional Conference

July 21, 2014 1 comment

Conference

 

The Centerpiece of the Gospel

In a day when many people believe that the gospel is simply a message about how we can have a better life, a clear proclamation of the cross and what it accomplished is among our most pressing needs. Learn More

 

Trustworthy Teaching

Join Drs. Steven Lawson, Stephen Nichols, and R.C. Sproul in Philadelphia as they reflect on the atoning work of Christ. They will consider topics such as the necessity of the atonement, the reason for the incarnation, and the two natures of Christ. View Speakers | View Schedule

 

Register Now and Save

Register today for our 2014 Regional Conference in Philadelphia and save $20. Register Now

 

Join Us in Philadelphia

We hope to see you October 3-4:
Tenth Presbyterian Church
1701 Delancey St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103
View Map and Travel Information 

 

2014 New England Study Tour

Immediately prior to the conference, consider joining Dr. Steven Lawson and Dr. Stephen Nichols for our New England Study Tour on the theme, “Following the Reformation to America.” As an added bonus you will receive complimentary admission to our 2014 Regional Conference. Learn More

 
Source:[Ligonier Ministries]

2014 National Conference — Questions and Answers

Earlier this month we held our 2014 National Conference on the theme, Overcoming the World. This conference sought to consider what Scripture says about confronting worldliness, defending the faith, living as a faithful remnant, and understanding biblical ethics.

One of the highlights from our conferences are the times of questions and answers. You can watch both sessions below or via our Vimeo and YouTube channels. For the other messages, please stream the conference here.

 

Questions and Answers #1

  

Sinclair Ferguson, Robert Godfrey, Steven Lawson, Albert Mohler, and R.C. Sproul were asked the following questions:

1. How do US army chaplains stay faithful to God and His truth, and provide the gospel to same-sex couples? How do they stay faithful amidst the persecution? (00:13)

2. I have a son who has entered into a homosexual lifestyle. How do I handle this, how do I act, what do I say? (02:58 )

3. I have many Christian friends who are libertarians and say the state should not be involved in marriage at all. Is this a correct position? (14:13)

4. I have a relative who is constantly trying to say that if I try to say something is false or sinful I am “condemning” the person or the thing and am not being loving. What do I say in response? (23:13)

5. Is personal peace and affluence the biggest impediment to Christian witness? (28:37)

6. How do I explain the reality of sin? (29:41)

7. Since there is one God, why is it that we have so many different views and denominations? (30:27)

8. We live in a rural area without access to solid biblical teaching, let alone Reformed teaching. The nearest church with such teaching is 2 hours drive away. How should we agree to meet with and serve when we don’t agree with things taught from the pulpit? (36:04)

9. Dr. Lawson, could you elaborate on the Lord’s concept of salt and light in the Sermon on the Mount and how He describes Christian character? (37:40)

10. Dr. Mohler, is homeschooling a retreat from the world? Can we put children in school and expect them to engage the world? (42:05)

11. What is the biblical way we should think about movies such as, Son of God, Noah, God’s Not Dead, and Heaven is for Real? (45:25)

12. What words of advice and encouragement would you give to someone teaching three and four year-olds? How do we prepare them for a world that will be against them if they follow Jesus? (54:20)

 

Questions and Answers #2

 Voddie Baucham, Stephen Nichols, R.C. Sproul, R.C. Sproul Jr., and Derek Thomas were asked the following questions:

1. Athanasius confronted the issue of the deity of Christ. What is the strongest enemy the church faces today? (00:10)

2. If God wants us to spend all eternity with Him, why didn’t He just put us with Him from the beginning? (08:43)

3. How do we deal with knowing some of our loved ones may be headed to perdition? (11:29)

4. Since we are chosen before the foundation of the world, how does God view us before we are born again? (15:30)

5. Dr. Baucham, you said that you had overcome numerous struggles as a married adult man due to not having your father around when younger. I can relate. Can you talk about this a bit? (16:42)

6. I am trying to reconcile the death of my son. How do I deal with my anger against God experienced as I am in this dark time? (20:08)

7. Since God is slow to anger and patient, why, when man first sinned, was His wrath and punishment so severe? (23:19)

8. What is the minimal amount of gospel truth that must be believed to be saved? (25:43)

9. How can we overcome the view that the OT portrays an unloving and ungracious God? (29:25)

10. Can you discuss the relationship between God’s sovereignty in salvation and man’s responsibility? (33:30)

11. What is the balance between standing for truth and maintaining the unity of the Spirit? (34:08)

12. About Luther’s anti-Semitism seen in his writings—How can these attitudes and actions of the father of the Reformation be justified? (38:26)

13. What is the Reformed view of speaking in tongues? (43:20)

14. Given that we are not of the world, but sent into the world, what should our political involvement be, particularly for moral issues? (46:22)

15. I have a friend who says she is saved but has no need for the church. How can I help her return to church? (49:00)

16. How can pastors encourage their flocks to engage the world in the most effective way in the public square? (52:04)

17. Is repentance more than a change of mind? How can I know that I’ve repented enough? (53:52)

Note: Answers given during Questions and Answers sessions reflect the views of the individual speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of Dr. R.C. Sproul and Ligonier Ministries. Here is our Statement of Faith.

 

 

Source [Ligionier Ministries]