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Posts Tagged ‘Substitute’

The Wednesday Word: For Us!

We are saved entirely by the work Christ has done for us, not by His work in us.

Consider this; He was born for us. “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace’. Isaiah 9:6. The eternal God entered into time and history in the person of His Son. He did so for us. The Creator became a creature for us. He Lived For Us!

Paul says—-“For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though he was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that ye through His poverty might be rich.” 2 Cor. 8:9. He came into this world as an infant, and there was no place in the inn for Him. He walked the dusty roads of Israel, and at times there was no place for Him to lay His head. He humbled Himself, yet the world scorned Him. He humbled Himself, but they called Him Beelzebub, He humbled Himself, but they called Him a bastard—-an illegitimate child. He humbled Himself, but they said he was just “the carpenter’s son.” ——-Even at His trial, one man could only refer to Him as “this fellow.” (Matt. 26:61).

All this was for us. But more than that, He was executed, and they had to borrow a grave for His body. When He took our place, He had nothing. But, while He lived here on earth, He was wholly set apart for us (John 17:19). He was made a curse for us. “Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us (for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who hangs on a tree”), Galatians 3:13. He was wounded for us. “But He was wounded for our transgressions. He was bruised for our iniquities. The chastisement of our peace was upon Him, And by His stripes we are healed.” Isaiah 53:5—— It is Finished!

Some of us have become immune to hearing about Him, and how He came here for us and went to the cross. We tire of hearing that He was wounded for us. WARNING! If you become immune to these truths you will wither spiritually! “Lest I forget Gethsemane,’ Lest I forget thine agony, Lest I forget thy love for me, Lead me to Calvary’.

He was born for us, He lived for us, He died for us and He arose and ascended to heaven for us (Rom.4:25; John 14:2). And right this moment He is living for us and praying for us (Heb. 7:25). And when He finally comes again, He’ll come back for us (John 14:3). It is all finished! His intercession for us at this very moment is based on His finished, accomplished work. His returning for us is to consummate and crown with glory all that He accomplished in His doing and dying and rising again! It is Finished Everything Jesus intended to do He accomplished! If we want to build a strong Christian life we must lay the foundations broad and deep.

The deepest and strongest foundation is the Person and Finished Work of Christ! If we want to be effective in the Gospel then we will dwell much on the Gospel! May we learn that it is finished. May we grasp that all that is necessary for our salvation has been completed and accomplished! His work was a total success.

He finished the work that the Father gave Him to do!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word: Grounded and Established in the Gospel

Calvary assures us that the wrath which should have consumed us has fallen upon our Substitute (1 Thessalonians 1:10). Faith in Christ alone, therefore, rescues us from the bondage of having to perform to avoid the wrath of God. In Christ alone, faith sees the smile of the Father upon us.

Though faith is not our righteousness it fastens us to the righteousness of Christ and sees, as old Solomon Stoddard saw, that Christ’s righteousness makes it safe for us to appear in heaven. Indeed, the only safe way to heaven is to trust in the doing, dying and rising again of Christ. Faith grasps that our acceptance before God is in Christ alone and not in our faith. Faith in faith saves no one. Gospel faith understands this!

Furthermore, faith grasps that our eternal standing in the ages to come depends, not upon anything in us, but upon the unchanging righteousness of Christ alone outside of us. When we are not established in the gospel, we easily make the mistake of looking within ourselves to determine whether or not we have certain feelings. Unfortunately, if we find the correct feelings, we then content ourselves that our faith is strong and that we are thus eternity bound. Conversely, alarm bells ring when we can’t find those feelings because we then assume that our destiny is in doubt. When we live like this, we are unsettled and confused. We have not yet understood that anything subjective, whether it is the work of the Spirit in us or our feelings and experiences, can ever qualify as the object of our faith. They are not the Gospel! Acquittal before God comes only through the person and work of the Lord Jesus. He alone is the sinner’s plea for, “He that believeth on him is not condemned” (John 3:18).

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word: The Gospel and “The Holy Man of God.”

September 10, 2014 Leave a comment

I pity the poor spaceman coming to earth to try to discover the God of the Christians by examining the various standards that are presented as holiness. What a variety of views he’s got to choose from! For example, some groups of Christians drink wine while others think such practices to be accursed. Some watch TV; others make TV a taboo. A friend of mine once went to preach in Germany. He showed up on the first Sunday morning and was met by the elders who told him to remove his tie. Ties were worldly they said. That evening, he was to preach for another group just 50 miles away so he showed up without a tie. The elders met him and told him, in no uncertain terms, that he could not preach without a tie. The lack of a tie was a sure sign of laxity and carnality. Go figure!

Some groups eat everything while some refuse to eat meat. Some go as far as to stick strictly to the Old Testament food laws. One group I knew were so confident of their stand on the food laws they even crooned about it in their services. They sang;

 

“Keep the food laws, they are good laws

You know I’m feeling fine since I left off eating swine.

Keep the food laws they are good laws,

I aim to keep the food laws all the time”

 

What a jolly little chorus!

Some groups insist that their women wear hats or head coverings while the same denomination perhaps in a different location would not have the same emphasis. I’ve found that standards of piety can vary and change by geography. Unfortunately, we have become masters at teaching for doctrine the standards of man and our group piety is often subtly presented as the way of obtaining “Grade A” status before God.

But the gospel is not about our piety. It is about Christ’s piety. Jesus Christ completely pleased the Father in everything he did. He worshiped and glorified the Father with all his heart, soul, mind and strength. Everything Christ did not only pleased the Father but “well” pleased Him. His actions were, not only always right and correct, but were also always done from a pure heart and a right motive.

Psalm 24 gives us a wonderful picture of Jesus. It asks, “Who shall ascend unto the hill of the Lord or who shall dwell in His holy place.” It then gives the answer, “He that has clean hands and a pure heart who has not lifted up His soul unto vanity.” Jesus Christ is the only one who perfectly fits this picture. He is the only one whose hands are truly clean and whose motives are utterly pure. We would do well if we worried less about how to have clean hands and occupied ourselves with the one whose hands are already entirely clean. Our clean hands will follow along afterwards.

So be warned, preoccupation with ourselves and our standards removes us from the gospel because our condition and behaviour, once more, become the central focus of our Christian life.

Important to us as they may be, no church standards are able to grant us acceptance before the Father. Christ alone does that! Since standards cannot gain acceptance for us, then they certainly can not make us more accepted before God than the others who do not share them. The world is not in need of more Christians going out proclaiming their religion. The world does not need to hear about this or that group piety. It is not in need of a “don’t smoke, don’t chew, don’t go with girls that do” message. The need of the hour is a return to gospel proclamation. We need once more to announce the Excellencies of the Person of Christ, His doing and dying and rising again!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles

 

www.milesmckee.com 

My new book, “And that’s the Gospel Truth!” is a must for those who love the gospel. It is now available on Amazon in both print and eBook format. Click here

Miles McKee

Minister of the Gospel

The Grace Centre,

6 Quay Street, New Ross,

County Wexford, Ireland.

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The Wednesday Word: Saved to the Uttermost: Part 2

‘Wherefore, He is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever lives to make intercession for them.”—Hebrews 7:25.

Here is some excellent news; Christ Jesus, our great High Priest, has been entrusted with full authority and power to save all for whom He died. He is able to save to the uttermost. Many a doctor has wanted to save a patient, but has not been capable of doing so. Many parents have been willing to transfer the suffering of their child to themselves, but were unable to. The will was there, but there was no ability. Do we think Christ is like that?

Here’s the gospel truth; the Lord Jesus is not merely willing to save; He doesn’t just try to save or do His best to save, but He actually saves to the uttermost all who come to God by Him.

Christ Jesus succeeds where everyone else fails! He saves to the uttermost. He saves with an all-sufficient omnipotence. He takes us at our worst and saves us completely … or as one old-time Irish preacher used to say, “He saves us from the guttermost to the uttermost.”

Because He saves to the uttermost, He sacrificed Himself on Calvary. Because He saves to the uttermost, He made full satisfaction for our sins. Because He saves to the uttermost, He intercepted the wrath of God which was headed straight at us. Because He saves to the uttermost, He rose from the grave. Because He saves to the uttermost, He ascended into Heaven. Because He saves to the uttermost, He now makes constant intercession for us.

 

He is the Great High priest who saves to the uttermost.

Because He is our High Priest, He saves from the uttermost of guilt.

Because He is our High Priest, He saves from the uttermost of condemnation.

Because He is our High Priest, He saves from the uttermost of damnation.

Because He is our High Priest, He saves from the uttermost of death.

He is able to save to the uttermost!

 

What a staggering gospel. At the cross, Christ was the victim, at the resurrection He was the victor. Christ died, Christ has risen, Christ has ascended to the right hand of the Father and ever lives to make intercession for us (Romans 8:34). He saves to the uttermost! Having obtained eternal redemption for us at Calvary, He now applies the blessings of His accomplishments from the Holy of Holies. He is alive with the power of an endless life and thus guarantees that we will realize the full benefits and blessings of His sacrifice. He ever-lives and because of that endless life we have the pledge that we will be saved to the uttermost by Him.

As the Hymn writer wrote,

 

“Five bleeding wounds He bears, received on Calvary;

They pour effectual prayers they strongly plead for me;

“Forgive Him O forgive,” they cry,

“That ransomed sinner must not die.”

 

Christ saves all who come to God by Him. He saves completely with an exhaustive, all-encompassing salvation. The Christ of the cross is now the High Priest and King of Heaven. He is perfectly suited to those who cannot save themselves because He is able to save to the uttermost. Christ Jesus died on the cross, but unlike the priests of the Old Covenant, his death did not signal a cessation of His ministry. Christ Jesus rose from the dead and entered glory as our great High Priest. In Him, we are presented before the Father. He is the guarantee that we will never perish. He saves to the uttermost!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles McKee

 

Minister of the Gospel

The Grace Centre

6 Quay Street, New Ross,

County Wexford, Ireland.

www.milesmckee.com 

We are currently in the United States, preaching Christ Crucified, and telling people of our growing gospel work in Ireland, the UK and other areas. We are asking Lord to raise up additional partners to join with us in our on-going gospel crusade. Please pray that we find more people to stand with us financially.

Feel free to forward the Wednesday Word to your friends and family. Also, feel free to, without changing the content, post or blog etc this material. 

The Wednesday Word: Saved to the Uttermost

The Wednesday Word: Saved to the Uttermost

 

‘Wherefore, He is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever lives to make intercession for them.”—Hebrews 7:25.

One of the biggest words in our language is the word, “Uttermost.” It has been said that, ‘no one has ever seen the uttermost nor travelled there. We have mapped the earth, pinpointed the stars and measured the distances between the planets, but in spite of all our learning and knowledge no one has ever located the uttermost!’

The uttermost is like the horizon; it’s always further on. Our understanding of God’s love is like that. Just when we think we have begun to understand it, we see that He loves us to an even deeper degree than we have yet imagined. He loves us to the uttermost! We read in John 13:1, “Having loved his own he loved them to the end (literally, to the uttermost). His love is always greater than we can fathom. He has lavished His amazing love upon us yet, in our experience, its fullest extent, the uttermost, is always farther on.

When we look at Christ’s incarnation and life on our behalf, we glimpse a measure of His love for us, but we are so spiritually dull that it remains only a glimpse. When we look at the cross we continue to receive a sight of His love, but again we can’t grasp its fullest extent because the complete appreciation of His love is always further on. We are loved to the uttermost, but we have not yet arrived there in our understanding. Much as we grasp the wonderful things of the gospel, we are faced with a love that is greater than our comprehension, a love that is always further on. It’s a love to the uttermost!

Notice how in Hebrews 7:25 that we have a Saviour who not only loves us to the uttermost, but who also saves to the uttermost. I’m not sure why some people insist that Jesus can save us and then lose us for the Scripture is clear …He saves us to the uttermost. He has wonderfully accomplished our salvation and now, as our ever-living High Priest, He richly applies that same salvation to His blood bought possession.

 

He is able to save to the uttermost!

He is able to save us to the uttermost because He did not save himself (Luke 23:35).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because He died as though he were us (Galatians 2:20).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because He loved us and paid for us with His blood (Revelation 5:9).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because He has an endless priesthood (Hebrews 7:15-17).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because He appears in Heaven for us (Hebrews 9:24).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because, as He appears in Heaven, He presents Himself with His blood (Hebrews 9:12).

He is able to save us to the uttermost for He is applying the blessings of eternal redemption to us (Hebrews 9:12-15).

He is able to save us to the uttermost because he ever lives to make intercession for us (Hebrews 7:25).

 

That same Priest, who died on the cross, is alive never to die again. That same Jesus, who was buried in the tomb, is risen. He ever lives to ensure that His purchase is saved to the uttermost. He alone, plus nothing, is our salvation, and we rest our faith on Him alone. He is the crucified and risen Lord, the Master of all. He alone is our ever-living High Priest who saves to the uttermost.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles McKee

 

Minister of the Gospel

The Grace Centre

6 Quay Street, New Ross,

County Wexford, Ireland.

www.milesmckee.com 

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Sheltered by the Blood

October 9, 2013 1 comment

The Wednesday Word: Sheltered by the Blood

William Reid, in his short masterpiece, ‘The Blood of Jesus’, says,

 

“I do not know a more striking illustration of salvation by the blood of Jesus alone, than that which is furnished by the sprinkling of the blood of the Passover lamb on the homes of the Israelites, on the eve of their redemption from the bondage of Egypt. “The blood on the lintel secured Israel’s peace.” There was nothing more required in order to enjoy settled peace, in reference to the destroying angel, than the application of “the blood of sprinkling.” God did not add anything to the blood, because nothing more was necessary to obtain salvation from the sword of judgment. He did not say, “When I see the blood and the unleavened bread or bitter herbs, I will pass over.” By no means. These things had their proper place, and their proper value; but they never could be regarded as the ground of peace in the presence of God.”

 

Let’s expand on this. The LORD said, “When I see the blood I will pass over you.” He didn‘t say, “When I see how you feel about the blood, I will pass over you”; or, “When I see you praying and weeping, I will pass over you,” but said, “When I see the blood I will pass over you.”

It was the blood that saved them, not their righteousness. Some uncertain Christians say, “If I were only a better person, I would feel safe.” Or they say, “ I’m not good enough or consistent enough in my faith to be sure of salvation.” But here’s the gospel truth; … in this great matter of salvation, we don‘t need to enquire about the depth of our goodness. We must, instead, ask, are we sheltered under the blood? If we are, we are as safe as any man or woman who has been praying without ceasing, giving their finances and sacrificing for the cause of the gospel for 100 years. It is not their righteousness and good works that are going to save them. Good works and long hours of prayer and devotion, whilst excellent things, have never saved anyone. The Father says, “When I see the blood I will pass over you.” If we are sheltered beneath the blood, we are saved, and if we are not sheltered by the blood, we are not saved.

Furthermore, we are neither saved by our good thoughts concerning the blood nor saved by our good feelings concerning the blood. As has been pointed out by many, God did not say, “When you see the blood, I will pass over you.” No! But here’s what He said, “When I see the blood.” It is the Father’s estimation of the blood of Christ that is necessary in salvation. Faith grasps this. Faith sees and embraces that the wrath offering has been made. Faith grasps the fact that the blood of the sinless substitute has been shed. Faith sees that this is enough; faith sees that the perfect Christ performed and finished His perfect work on Calvary.

Since nothing can be added to the blood, then salvation is not a matter of the shed blood plus faith. Many, many depart from the gospel on this point in that they believe their faith makes them accepted to God. But faith neither does nor can make us acceptable to God. We are only accepted in the acceptable One, Jesus Christ. Faith did not pour out its blood, for it has none to pour.

Whom Christ is and what He did in His finished work are the object of our faith. Christ alone saves! Although our act of faith is vital, it is not the reason we are saved. The ground of our salvation is Christ alone.

And that’s the Gospel Truth

 

Please feel free to distribute the Wednesday Word in all ways (without charge) to everyone.

Also, feel free to contact us at,

Miles McKee Ministries,

PO Box 353,

Ponte Vedra Beach, FL, 32004

or

Miles McKee

8 Ard Beg,

Newbawn, County Wexford, Ireland.

Or at www.milesmckee.com

For free grace sermon downloads www.sermonaudio.com/milesmckee

What the Father Sees in Jesus

August 21, 2013 4 comments

The Wednesday Word:

                    

What the Father Sees in Jesus

When we look at Jesus we see the perfections of God, but when the Father looks at Him, He sees, among other things, the perfections of man. This is why Christ is the only qualified mediator between God and man (1 Timothy 2:5).

As you remember, when God created man, He created Him in His image, but through unbelieving disobedience, man fell from his position of intimacy with the Lord. Adam failed … as has every man since then, save one.

From the time of Adam to Christ, untold multitudes of people have come and gone, but all of them have been flawed, they were all imperfect, they had lost the image of God.  They could not love God with all of their being. They were subverted with the sweat stain of sin.

But then, 2000 years ago a baby was born to a virgin, and in this child we witnessed the arrival of the last Adam, the second man (1 Corinthians 15:45, 47). He was and is the representative man, man as God had intended. This new man, though truly human, was holy, righteous and perfect in all that He did, thought and said. In man’s spiritual blindness, however, few noticed anything in Him that should be desired (Isaiah 53:2). But no matter, in Christ, the Father saw His own thoughts and intentions realized. In Christ, the Father saw a sinless, righteous life lived out before Him in perfection.

No human eye saw what the Father saw in His Son. In Christ, man saw a carpenter, a travelling preacher and a miracle worker, but in Christ, the Father saw the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person (Hebrews 1:3).  In Christ’s teachings, men heard wisdom, but in these same teachings the Father heard His very own words. In the Son’s worship, men saw only that Christ withdrew to a quiet place, but in that quiet place the Father saw and received perfect worship. Men heard the Lord Jesus pray, but the Father heard perfect pleading and perfect petitioning according to His own will.  Praying and worship like this has not been heard since, nor does it have to be, for it is already credited to the believer’s account.

What a perfect substitute we have in the Lord Jesus. This is why He is the only one qualified to save us to the uttermost (Hebrews 7:25). By the way, is He your only confidence or is there something else you would like to add to Him?

When it comes to Jesus, is it any wonder that when the Father speaks of Him, He speaks in superlatives?  He could have simply said, “This is my Son in whom I am pleased,” but He didn’t; He said much more. He declared,“This is my ‘BELOVED’ Son in whom I am ‘WELL’ pleased.”  The Lord Jesus was the sheer delight of the Father for he loved the Father with His entire strength, soul and mind.

In Christ, we see the unfolding of the Father’s glory. We sometimes forget that we have been saved for the glory of God and the honour of His Son (Ephesians 1:5-6). We often centre too much on ourselves as being the hub of attention in salvation. We, for example, consider Christ Jesus to be our Shepherd, and so He is, but He is also Yahweh’s shepherd (Zechariah 13:7); the chosen shepherd who would be smitten. We say that Jesus is our Lamb and yes He is, but He is also God’s Lamb (John 1:29). He is the Lamb whom the Father has provided, not only to save us, but also to ensure that His justice would be satisfied. How the Father delights in the Son! May we also learn to do the same.

And that’s the Gospel Truth

 

Feel free to distribute the Wednesday Word (without charge) to all.

Also, feel free to contact us at

Miles McKee Ministries,

PO Box 353, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL, 32004

or

Miles McKee

8 Ard Beg, Newbawn, County Wexford, Ireland.

Or at www.milesmckee.com

God’s Graciousness in Dealing with Adam’s Descendants

I was in a meeting in a town in Texas, and there happened to be in the audience a United States Senator. After hearing me preach, he asked me home with him. He says:

“If you will make one point clear to me, I am ready to accept the Christian religion.”

“Well,” I said, “what point is it?”

“I can’t see the propriety of Jesus Christ dying for me – this idea of substitution, of the innocent suffering for the guilty. I know what the Bible says about it, but somehow or other my mind revolts at that. I do not understand the propriety of it.”

I told him if he would come to hear me I would preach a sermon on that. He said:

“If you make it plain, that very minute I will accept Jesus Christ as my Savior immediately as I remain in my seat.”

I told him that God made angels first, each angel full grown with mature intelligence, without father or mother, without posterity, without brothers or sisters; hence, there being no hereditary bias or room for any other being, nothing concerning posterity to deflect the mind, the angel that sinned could not possibly be restored. It would be improper to introduce a substitute for a sinning angel. But if God made a race in one, the race standing in that progenitor, subject to all the laws of heredity and to be swayed by the action of the ancestor, and if you and I yet unborn died in Adam, there is a propriety that a way of redemption for us should be provided in a Second Adam, a propriety that does not exist at all in the case of an angel, and, as in the case of that first Adam, all died by his one offense, so we are to be saved by the second transaction, through the Second Adam. When I got through, the Senator came up and offered himself for membership. (I refer to Senator Sam Bell Maxey.) He has ever since been a faithful member of the church of Jesus Christ.

B. H. Carroll—Man’s Creation, Fall, and Redemption

All of Grace—How May faith be Illustrated?

Chapter eight

How May Faith be Illustrated?

TO MAKE THE MATTER Of faith clearer still, I will give you a few illustrations. Though the Holy Spirit alone can make my reader see, it is my duty and my joy to furnish all the light I can, and to pray the divine Lord to open blind eyes. Oh that my reader would pray the same prayer for himself!

The faith which saves has its analogies in the human frame.

It is the eye which looks. By the eye we bring into the mind that which is far away; we can bring the sun and the far-off stars into the mind by a glance of the eye. So by trust we bring the Lord Jesus near to us; and though He be far away in Heaven, He enters into our heart. Only look to Jesus; for the hymn is strictly true —

 

There is life in a look at the Crucified One,

There is life at this moment for thee.

 

Faith is the hand which grasps. When our hand takes hold of anything for itself, it does precisely what faith does when it appropriates Christ and the blessings of His redemption. Faith says, “Jesus is mine.” Faith hears of the pardoning blood, and cries, “I accept it to pardon me.” Faith calls the legacies of the dying Jesus her own; and they are her own, for faith is Christ’s heir; He has given Himself and all that He has to faith. Take, O friend, that which grace has provided for thee. You will not be a thief, for you have a divine permit: “Whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.” He who may have a treasure simply by his grasping it will be foolish indeed if he remains poor.

Faith is the mouth which feeds upon Christ. Before food can nourish us, it must be received into us. This is a simple matter — this eating and drinking. We willingly receive into the mouth that which is our food, and then we consent that it should pass down into our inward parts, wherein it is taken up and absorbed into our bodily frame. Paul says, in his Epistle to the Romans, in the tenth chapter, “The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth.” Now then, all that is to be done is to swallow it, to suffer it to go down into the soul. Oh that men had an appetite! For he who is hungry and sees meat before him does not need to be taught how to eat. “Give me,” said one, “a knife and a fork and a chance.” He was fully prepared to do the rest. Truly, a heart which hungers and thirsts after Christ has but to know that He is freely given, and at once it will receive Him. If my reader is in such a case, let him not hesitate to receive Jesus; for he may be sure that he will never be blamed for doing so: for unto “as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God.” He never repulses one, but He authorizes all who come to remain sons for ever.

The pursuits of life illustrate faith in many ways. The farmer buries good seed in the earth, and expects it not only to live but to be multiplied. He has faith in the covenant arrangement, that “seed-time and harvest shall not cease,” and he is rewarded for his faith.

The merchant places his money in the care of a banker, and trusts altogether to the honesty and soundness of the bank. He entrusts his capital to another’s hands, and feels far more at ease than if he had the solid gold locked up in an iron safe.

The sailor trusts himself to the sea. When he swims he takes his foot from the bottom and rests upon the buoyant ocean. He could not swim if he did not wholly cast himself upon the water.

The goldsmith puts precious metal into the fire which seems eager to consume it, but he receives it back again from the furnace purified by the heat.

You cannot turn anywhere in life without seeing faith in operation between man and man, or between man and natural law. Now, just as we trust in daily life, even so are we to trust in God as He is revealed in Christ Jesus.

Faith exists in different persons in various degrees, according to the amount of their knowledge or growth in grace. Sometimes faith is little more than a simple clinging to Christ; a sense of dependence and a willingness so to depend. When you are down at the seaside you will see limpets sticking to the rock. You walk with a soft tread up to the rock; you strike the mollusk a rapid blow with your walking-stick and off he comes. Try the next limpet in that way. You have given him warning; he heard the blow with which you struck his neighbor, and he clings with all his might. You will never get him off; not you! Strike, and strike again, but you may as soon break the rock. Our little friend, the limpet, does not know much, but he clings. He is not acquainted with the geological formation of the rock, but he clings. He can cling, and he has found something to cling to: this is all his stock of knowledge, and he uses it for his security and salvation. It is the limpet’s life to cling to the rock, and it is the sinner’s life to cling to Jesus. Thousands of God’s people have no more faith than this; they know enough to cling to Jesus with all their heart and soul, and this suffices for present peace and eternal safety. Jesus Christ is to them a Savior strong and mighty, a Rock immovable and immutable; they cling to him for dear life, and this clinging saves them. Reader, cannot you cling? Do so at once.

Faith is seen when one man relies upon another from a knowledge of the superiority of the other. This is a higher faith; the faith which knows the reason for its dependence, and acts upon it. I do not think the limpet knows much about the rock: but as faith grows it becomes more and more intelligent. A blind man trusts himself with his guide because he knows that his friend can see, and, trusting, he walks where his guide conducts him. If the poor man is born blind he does not know what sight is; but he knows that there is such a thing as sight, and that it is possessed by his friend and therefore he freely puts his hand into the hand of the seeing one, and follows his leadership. “We walk by faith, not by sight.” “Blessed are they which have not seen, and yet have believed.” This is as good an image of faith as well can be; we know that Jesus has about Him merit, and power, and blessing, which we do not possess, and therefore we gladly trust ourselves to Him to be to us what we cannot be to ourselves. We trust Him as the blind man trusts his guide. He never betrays our confidence; but He “is made of God unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption.”

Every boy that goes to school has to exert faith while learning. His schoolmaster teaches him geography, and instructs him as to the form of the earth, and the existence of certain great cities and empires. The boy does not himself know that these things are true, except that he believes his teacher, and the books put into his hands. That is what you will have to do with Christ, if you are to be saved; you must simply know because He tells you, believe because He assures you it is even so, and trust yourself with Him because He promises you that salvation will be the result. Almost all that you and I know has come to us by faith. A scientific discovery has been made, and we are sure of it. On what grounds do we believe it? On the authority of certain well-known men of learning, whose reputations are established. We have never made or seen their experiments, but we believe their witness. You must do the like with regard to Jesus: because He teaches you certain truths you are to be His disciple, and believe His words; because He has performed certain acts you are to be His client, and trust yourself with Him. He is infinitely superior to you, and presents himself to your confidence as your Master and Lord. If you will receive Him and His words you shall be saved.

Another and a higher form of faith is that faith which grows out of love. Why does a boy trust his father? The reason why the child trusts his father is because he loves him. Blessed and happy are they who have a sweet faith in Jesus, intertwined with deep affection for Him, for this is a restful confidence. These lovers of Jesus are charmed with His character, and delighted with His mission, they are carried away by the lovingkindness that He has manifested, and therefore they cannot help trusting Him, because they so much admire, revere, and love Him.

The way of loving trust in the Savior may thus be illustrated. A lady is the wife of the most eminent physician of the day. She is seized with a dangerous illness, and is smitten down by its power; yet she is wonderfully calm and quiet, for her husband has made this disease his special study, and has healed thousands who were similarly afflicted. She is not in the least troubled, for she feels perfectly safe in the hands of one so dear to her, and in whom skill and love are blended in their highest forms. Her faith is reasonable and natural; her husband, from every point of view, deserves it of her. This is the kind of faith which the happiest of believers exercise toward Christ. There is no physician like Him, none can save as He can; we love Him, and He loves us, and therefore we put ourselves into His hands, accept whatever He prescribes, and do whatever He bids. We feel that nothing can be wrongly ordered while He is the director of our affairs; for He loves us too well to let us perish, or suffer a single needless pang.

Faith is the root of obedience, and this may be clearly seen in the affairs of life. When a captain trusts a pilot to steer his vessel into port he manages the vessel according to his direction. When a traveler trusts a guide to conduct him over a difficult pass, he follows the track which his guide points out. When a patient believes in a physician, he carefully follows his prescriptions and directions. Faith which refuses to obey the commands of the Savior is a mere pretense, and will never save the soul. We trust Jesus to save us; He gives us directions as to the way of salvation; we follow those directions and are saved. Let not my reader forget this. Trust Jesus, and prove your trust by doing whatever He bids you.

A notable form of faith arises out of assured knowledge; this comes of growth in grace, and is the faith which believes Christ because it knows Him, and trusts Him because it has proved Him to be infallibly faithful. An old Christian was in the habit of writing T and P in the margin of her Bible whenever she had tried and proved a promise. How easy it is to trust a tried and proved Savior! You cannot do this as yet, but you will do so. Everything must have a beginning. You will rise to strong faith in due time. This matured faith asks not for signs and tokens, but bravely believes. Look at the faith of the master mariner — I have often wondered at it. He looses his cable, he steams away from the land. For days, weeks, or even months, he never sees sail or shore; yet on he goes day and night without fear, till one morning he finds himself exactly opposite to the desired haven toward which he has been steering. How has he found his way over the trackless deep? He has trusted in his compass, his nautical almanac, his glass, and the heavenly bodies; and obeying their guidance, without sighting land, he has steered so accurately that he has not to change a point to enter into port. It is a wonderful thing — that sailing or steaming without sight. Spiritually it is a blessed thing to leave altogether the shores of sight and feeling, and to say, “Good-by” to inward feelings, cheering providences, signs, tokens, and so forth. It is glorious to be far out on the ocean of divine love, believing in God, and steering for Heaven straight away by the direction of the Word of God. “Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed”; to them shall be administered an abundant entrance at the last, and a safe voyage on the way. Will not my reader put his trust in God in Christ Jesus. There I rest with joyous confidence. Brother, come with me, and believe our Father and our Savior. Come at once.

Charles H. Spurgeon—All of Grace

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Chapter VIII : Of Christ the Mediator

1. It pleased God in his eternal purpose, to chuse and ordain the Lord Jesus his only begotten Son, according to the Covenant made between them both, (a) to be the Mediator between God and Man; the (b) Prophet, (c) Priest and (d) King; Head and Saviour of his Church, the heir of all things, and judge of the world: Unto whom he did from all Eternity (e) give a people to be his seed, and to be by him in time redeemed, called, justified, sanctified, and glorified.

a Is. 42.1. 1 Pet. 1.19,20.

b Act. 3.22.

c Heb. 5.5,6.

d Ps. 2.6, Luk. 1.33 Eph. 1.23 Heb. 1.2. Act. 17.31

e Is. 53.10. Joh. 17.6. Rom.8:30.

2. The Son of God, the second Person in the Holy Trinity, being very and eternal God, the brightness of the Fathers glory, of one substance and equal with him: who made the World, who upholdeth and governeth all things he hath made: did when the fullness of time was come take unto him (f) mans nature, with all the Essential properties, and common infirmities thereof, (g) yet without sin: being conceived by the Holy Spirit in the Womb of the Virgin Mary, the Holy Spirit coming down upon her, and the power of the most High overshadowing her, (h) and so was made of a Woman, of the Tribe of Judah, of the Seed of Abraham, and David according to the Scriptures: So that two whole, perfect, and distinct natures, were inseparably joined together in one Person: without conversion, composition, or confusion: which Person is very God, and very Man; yet one (i) Christ, the only Mediator between God and Man.

f Joh. 1.1.14. Gal. 4.4.

g Rom. 8.3. Heb. 2.14.16,17. ch. 4.15.

h Luk. 1.27,31.35.

i Rom. 9.5. 1 Tim. 2.5.

3. The Lord Jesus in his humane nature thus united to the divine, in the Person of the Son, was sanctified, & anointed (k) with the Holy Spirit, above measure; having in him (l) all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge; in whom it pleased the Father that (m) all fullness should dwell: To the end that being (n) holy, harmless, undefiled, and full (o) of Grace, and Truth, he might be throughly furnished to execute the office of a Mediator, and (p) Surety; which office he took not upon himself, but was thereunto (q) called by his Father; who also put (r) all power and judgement in his hand, and gave him Commandement to execute the same.

k Ps. 45.7. Act. 10.38 Joh. 3.34.

l Col. 2.3.

m Col. 1.19.

n Heb. 7.26.

o Joh. 1.14.

p Heb. 7.22.

q Heb. 5.5.

r Joh. 5.22.27. Mat. 28.18. Act. 2.36.

4. This office the Lord Jesus did most (s) willingly undertake, which that he might discharge he was made under the Law, (t) and did perfectly fulfill it, and underwent the (u) punishment due to us, which we should have born and suffered, being made (x) Sin and a Curse for us: enduring most grievous sorrows (y) in his Soul; and most painful sufferings in his body; was crucified, and died, and remained in the state of the dead; yet saw no (z) corruption: on the (a) third day he arose from the dead, with the same (b) body in which he suffered; with which he also (c) ascended into heaven: and there sitteth at the right hand of his Father, (d) making intercession; and shall (e) return to judge Men and Angels, at the end of the World.

s Ps. 40.7,8. Heb. 10.5-11. Joh. 10.18.

t Gal. 4 4. Mat. 3.15.

u Gal. 3.13. Isa. 53.6. 1 Pet. 3.18.

x 2 Cor. 5 21.

y Mat. 26.37,38. Luk. 22.44. Mat. 27.46.

z Act. 13.37.

a 1 Cor. 15.3,4.

b Joh. 20.25.27.

c Mark 16 19. Act. 1.9,10,11.

d Rom. 8.34. Heb. 9.24

e Act. 10.42. Rom. 14.9,10. Act. 1.10. [It appears that the reference to Act_1:10 in the original manuscript is an error. Most modern editions have Act_1:11, which seems more relevant.]

5. The Lord Jesus by his perfect obedience and sacrifice of himself, which he through the Eternal Spirit once offered up unto God, (f) hath fully satisfied the Justice of God, procured reconciliation, and purchased an Everlasting inheritance in the Kingdom of Heaven, (g) for all those whom the Father hath given unto him.

f  Heb. 9.14. ch. 10.14.Rom. 3.25,26.

g Joh. 17.2. Heb. 9.15.

6. Although the price of Redemption was not actually paid by Christ, till after his Incarnation, (*) yet the vertue, efficacy, and benefit thereof were communicated to the Elect in all ages successively, from the beginning of the World, in and by those Promises, Types, and Sacrifices, wherein he was revealed, and signified to be the Seed of the Woman, which should bruise the Serpents head; (h) and the Lamb slain from the foundation of the World: (i) Being the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever.

* 1 Cor. 4.10. Heb. 4.2. 1 Pet. 1.10,11.

h Rev. 13.8.

i Heb. 13.8.

7. Christ in the work of Mediation acteth according to both natures, by each nature doing that which is proper to it self; yet by reason of the Unity of the Person, that which is proper to one nature, is sometimes in Scripture attributed to the Person (k) denominated by the other nature.

k Joh. 3.13. Act. 20.28.

8. To all those for whom Christ hath obtained eternal redemption, he doth certainly, and effectually (l) apply, and communicate the same; making intercession for them, uniting them to himself by his spirit, (m) revealing unto them, in and by the word, the mystery of salvation; perswading them to believe, and obey; (n) governing their hearts by his word and spirit, and (o) overcoming all their enemies by his Almighty power, and wisdom; in such manner, and wayes as are most consonant to his wonderful, and (p) unsearchable dispensation; and all of free, and absolute Grace, without any condition foreseen in them, to procure it.

l Joh. 6.37. ch. 10.15.16. & ch. 17.9.Rom. 5.10.

m Joh. 17.6, Eph. 1.9. 1 Joh. 5.20.

n Rom. 8.9.14.

o Ps. 110.1. 1 Cor. 15.25,26.

p Joh. 3.8 Eph. 1.8.

9. This office of Mediator between God and Man, is proper (q) onely to Christ, who is the Prophet, Priest, and King of the Church of God; and may not be either in whole, or any part thereof transfer’d from him to any other.

q 1 Tim. 2.5.

10. This number and order of Offices is necessary; for in respect of our (r) ignorance, we stand in need of his prophetical Office; and in respect of our alienation from God, (s) and imperfection of the best of our services, we need his Priestly office, to reconcile us, and present us acceptable unto God: and in respect o our averseness, and utter inability to return to God, and for our rescue, and security from our spiritual adversaries, we need his Kingly office, (t) to convince, subdue, draw, uphold, deliver, and preserve us to his Heavenly Kingdome.

r Joh. 1.18.

s Col. 1.21. Gal. 5.17.

t Joh. 16.8. Ps. 110.3 Luk. 1.74.75.

The 1677/89LondonBaptist Confession