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For the purpose of impressiveness other declarations are introduced with the word “Behold”

For the purpose of impressiveness other declarations are introduced with the word “Behold”; “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!” (Psalm 133:1, and cf. 1 John 3:1).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

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The importance of heeding the Divine emphasis in intimated in a number of ways

The importance of heeding the Divine emphasis in intimated in a number of ways. “The verily, verily” with which Christ prefaced some of His weightiest utterances. His use of the interrogative rather than the affirmative in such cases as

What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” (Mark 8:36)

so much more forceful than “It would profit a man nothing if,” etc. In order to call urgent attention to what He has just said, Christ’s “he that hath ears to hear, let him hear” is used again, with a slight variation, in each of His addresses to the seven churches of Revelation 2 and 3. Several notable statements of Paul are prefaced with “This is a faithful saying.” When he explains the significance of Melchizedek he gives point to this principle:

first being by interpretation King of righteousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is, King of peace” (Hebrews 7:2, and cf. James 3:17)

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

In the Greek emphasis is indicated by the order of words in a sentence

In the Greek emphasis is indicated by the order of words in a sentence:

“Now of Jesus Christ the birth was on this wise” (Matthew 1:18);

“But commendeth His love toward us” (Romans 5:8).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Hebrew Parallelism

In the Old Testament many examples are found of what is called Hebrew parallelism, in which the same thought is expressed in different language. For instance,

“He shall judge the world in righteousness, He shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness” (Psalm 9:8).

Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18, and compare Isaiah 1:18). In other cases the truth is driven home by a contrast:

“The curse of the Lord is in the house of the wicked: but He blesseth the habitation of the just” (Proverbs 3:33, and 15:17).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

A simple form of structural repetition occurs in the adoring language found at both the beginning and the end of Psalm 8

A simple form of structural repetition occurs in the adoring language found at both the beginning and the end of Psalm 8, “O Lord our Lord, how excellent is Thy name in all the earth!” Other forms of this principle are what are technically known as cyloides, or circular repetition, where the same phrase occurs at regular intervals, as in “Turn us again, O God” (Psalm 80:3, 7, 9); epibole, or overlaid repetition, where the same phrase is used at irregular intervals, as “the voice of the Lord” (Psalm 29:3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9); epimone, or lingering, where the repetition is with the design of making a more lasting impression, as in John 21:15-17, where our Lord continued to challenge the love of His erring disciple, and evinced His acceptance of his responses by His “feed My lambs, feed My sheep.”

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

Another means and method employed by the Spirit to arrest our attention and focus our minds upon distinct portions of the Truth is His use of a great number of “figures of speech”

Another means and method employed by the Spirit to arrest our attention and focus our minds upon distinct portions of the Truth is His use of a great number of “figures of speech.” In them He has arranged words and phrases in an unusual manner for the purpose of more deeply impressing the reader with what is said. The learned author of The Companion Bible (now almost unobtainable) dealt more fully with this subject than any English writer, and from him we now select one or two examples. The figure of anabasis or graduation, in which there is the working up to a climax, as in

“Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justifieth. Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Romans 8:33, 34).

So again in 2 Peter 1:5-7, “add to your faith virtue… charity.” The opposite figure is that of catabasis or gradual descent, a notable instance of which is found in Philippians 2:6-8.

The more common form of emphasis is that of repetition. This is found in the Word in quite a variety of ways, as in the doubling of a name: “Abraham, Abraham” (Genesis 22:11). There were six other individuals whom the Lord thus addressed: “Jacob, Jacob” (46:2), “Moses, Moses” (Exodus 3:4), “Samuel, Samuel” (1 Samuel 3:10), “Martha, Martha” (Luke 10:41), “Simon, Simon” (22:10), “Saul, Saul” (Acts 9:4). Then there was our Lord’s pathetic “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem” (Matthew 23:37), and His cry of anguish, “My God, My God” (Matthew 27:46); as there will yet be the urgent “Lord, Lord” of the lost (Luke 13:25). Such intensified forms of expression as “the holy of holies,” “the song of songs, vanity of vanities,” and the unspeakable “for ever and ever,” express the same principle. Again,

“Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and He shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the Lord” (Psalm 27:14);

“Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice” (Philippians 4:4). Yet more emphatic is the “holy, holy, holy” of Isaiah 6:3, the

“O earth, earth, earth, hear the word of the Lord” (Jeremiah 22:29), and because it will not, the “I will overturn, overturn, overturn” (Ezekiel 21:27), with the resultant

“Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabitants of the earth” (Revelation 8:13).

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures

The Law of Emphasis

25. The law of emphasis. The fundamental importance and perpetuity of the moral law was intimated in its being written by God’s own finger, and by the two tables on which it was inscribed being placed for safe custody within the sacred ark. The inestimable value of the Gospel was signified in its being announced to the shepherds by an angel, “Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people,” and his being joined by a great multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

“Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men” (Luke 2:10, 14).

The relative weightiness of anything is generally indicated by the place and prominence given to it in the Scriptures. Thus, only two of the evangelists make mention of the actual birth of Christ; only one of them supplies us with any details about His boyhood; Mark and Luke alone refer to His ascension; but all four of them describe His sacrificial death and victorious resurrection! How plainly that tells us which should be most pressed by His servants, and which should most engage the hearts and minds of His people!

Arthur W. Pink-Interpretation of the Scriptures