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Two things that will tempt you to give up the form of sound words

SpurgeonIII. And now, very briefly, in the third place, LET ME WARN YOU OF TWO DANGERS.

One is, that you will be very much tempted to give up the form of sound words that you hold, on account of the opposition you will met with. I do not prophesy that you will have corporeal persecution, though I know there are some poor creatures here that have to endure that from ungodly husbands, and such like; but you will all of you, in some measure, if you hold the truth, meet with the persecution of the tongue. You will be laughed at: your doctrine will be held up to ridicule exhibited in a grotesque manner, you will be caricatured in all that you believe and you will be sometimes tempted to say, “No I do not believe that,” though all the while you do. Or if you do not positively say it, you will at times be led to turn a little, because the laughter you cannot stand, and the scoff of the worldly wise is rather too hard for you. Oh! my beloved, let me warn you against being thus drawn aside. “Hold fast the form of sound words” in the midst of all ridicule. But the greatest obstacle you will have is a sort of slight and cunning trying to pervert you to the belief, that your doctrine is the same with one which is just the very opposite. The enemy will try to persuade you that something he holds is quite harmless, though opposed to what you hold; and be will say, “You do not want to be broaching these things, that must bring forth controversy, there is a way of squaring your sentiments with mine.” And you know we all like to be thought so liberal! The greatest pride in the world now is to be thought liberal in sentiment; and some of us would run a hundred miles, rather than be called a bigot or an Antinomian. I beseech you, be not drawn aside by those who are so ready to subvert your faith, not by openly attacking it, but by insidiously undermining every doctrine saying, this does not signify, and that does not signify, while all the while they are trying to pull down every castle and fortress wherewith God has guarded his truth and his Church.

Charles H. Spurgeon-The Form of Sound Words-Delivered on Sabbath, May 11, 1856

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A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine-5-Jesus Christ-A Man

November 21, 2013 3 comments

Jesus Christ-A Man

 

1. We have learned that Jesus was a descendant of Adam; was He, then, a man?

He was a man in every respect; but He was without sin.

2. Mention some respects in which He was a man.

He had a human body and soul and could not only suffer, but was also liable to temptation.

3. Was He ever tempted?

Yes; Satan tried in every way to make Him sin, but could not.

4. Was He made subject to the law of God?

He was, and rendered perfect obedience to it.

5. Had He the same bodily desires and appetites that we have?

Yes; He felt hunger and thirst, and was liable to all sinless infirmities.

6. Was His soul also liable to suffer?

Yes; it was His soul that suffered most severely in fulfilling the work which He came to do.

7. For what did this human nature fit Him?

Not only to die for us, but also to sympathize with us in our trials and temptations.

James P. Boyce-A Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine

The Richest of God’s Grace, Makes us more than Conquerors

The riches of His free grace cause me daily to triumph over all the temptations of the wicked one, who is very vigilant, and seeks all occasions to disturb me.

George Whitefield

 

Concerning our Lust

Though Satan instils his poison, and fans the flames of our corrupt desires within us, we are yet not carried by any external force to the commission of sin, but our own flesh entices us, and we willingly yield to its allurements.

John Calvin on Gen 22:1

 

Grief and Troubles Exalt and Lift Us

The highest honor that God can confer upon his children is the blood-red crown of martyrdom. The jewels of a Christian are his afflictions. The regalia of the kings that God has made, are their troubles, their sorrows, and their griefs. Griefs exalt us, and troubles lift us.

Charles H Spurgeon

God puts no more on us than we can bear

Not to be afflicted is a sign of weakness; for, therefore God imposeth no more on me, because he sees I can bear no more.

Joseph Hall

Concerning those who are not industrious in the things of God

Some temptations come to the industrious, but all temptations attack the idle.

Charles H. Spurgeon (1834-1892)