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Posts Tagged ‘Trevin Wax’

Keep a Close Watch . . . On the Teaching: Tom Nettles Responds to Trevin Wax’s Post

By Tom Nettles

I think there has been a misunderstanding. Trevin Wax is concerned that I am writing off my non-Calvinist brethren as “on the same plane of theological degeneracy as man-centered liberals.” He then compares that to the non-Calvinist argument that all Calvinists have the seeds of hyper-Calvinism ready to blossom in their breast. Both types of argumentation are then chastised. Wax gives advice that we recognize how good for each other we actually are. Perhaps in another post, in a different context, I would argue exactly what he presents me as arguing here – that Arminianism and other types of non-Calvinism do harbor a philosophical stance that more easily invites a humanistic/naturalistic approach to religious studies, biblical studies, and doctrinal development.

That was not this post, however. His concerns about any purpose to “chase out brothers and sisters who are not of the same theological persuasion,” I would suppose, are more aimed at the non-Calvinist than the Calvinist. They certainly have more experience at that in the Southern Baptist context than do the Calvinists and exercised that option, in my opinion, in confessionally sound ways during the decades of the Conservative Resurgence. Even now, unless we want another situation of sign but don’t believe culture on our hands, by-laws at Southern Baptist institutions require certain confessional commitments; to ignore these would be a failure of stewardship before God and Southern Baptists. J. P. Boyce’s discussion of the three-fold level of confessional knowledge and responsibility that he proposed in his Three Changes in Theological Institutions has genuine relevance on this issue.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

A Response to Trevin Wax: Does Moving Away from Calvinism Necessarily Lead to Liberalism?

by Guest Blogger

[The following is a guest post by Jared Longshore. Jared is a pastor at Grace Baptist Church in Cape Coral, FL, a PhD candidate at SBTS, and blogger at http://jaredlongshore.com]

***I sent this to Trevin before posting, and he in turn has sent me a very thoughtful and brotherly response. Trevin’s response has helped me to express myself more clearly and refine my critique of his post. May such a spirit continue to mark our conversations about these things in the SBC.

I thank God for the work of Trevin Wax on the Gospel Coalition blog. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading his posts and will continue to do so. I believe his recent post, “Does Moving Away From Calvinism Necessarily Lead to Liberalism?” in which he questions Dr. Tom Nettles’ post “Here’s The Point: Calvinists and Non-Calvinists in the SBC” provides an opportunity to consider the place of theological dialogue in our cooperative mission. I stand in whole-hearted agreement with Trevin when he says his aim is “strengthening our ties of cooperation for mission.” But I think there are certain principles in his response that, if adopted, might stunt both our theological growth and cooperation for mission. Since Trevin has offered his thoughts, I offer my own in four principles that I believe he has overlooked in his response to Nettles. These principles are, I think, essential to strengthening Southern Baptist ties for ministry and missions.

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.

Trevin Wax Responds to Nettles Article: Does Moving Away from Calvinism Necessarily lead to Liberalism?

by Trevin Wax

In the past decade, Southern Baptists have engaged in an ongoing conversation about the rise of Calvinism within our churches and seminaries, and whether this development should be embraced or resisted. Several years ago, a committee with representatives from both sides came together and released a document explaining how Calvinists and non-Calvinists can coincide peacefully within the Convention.

I realize that many of my readers are not Southern Baptists and may not be interested in these conversations. Likewise, many within the Convention see this debate as an irrelevant, intramural squabble. If you’re in one of those categories, please bear with me today. Every now and then, I post some thoughts about the debate, always (hopefully) with the aim of strengthening our ties of cooperation for mission. That’s my aim with this post as well.

Last week, Dr. Tom Nettles wrote a post for the Founders blog that took issue with one of the claims in the “Traditionalist Statement” put together by non-Calvinist Southern Baptists: “For almost a century,” the statement says, “Southern Baptists have found that a sound, biblical soteriology can be taught, maintained, and defended without subscribing to Calvinism.”

 

 

 

Read the entire article here.