Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Victory’

The Wednesday Word: The Open Hands of Jesus

You open your hand and satisfy the desire of every living thing (Psalm 145:16).

What a powerful verse! Christ´s hands are opened for the daily supply of our needs. An opened hand signifies favour, a closed one, the reverse. So, here´s the truth of the matter, the opened hands of Jesus give all manner of good things to His people. May we continually believe and enjoy this excellent truth.

Think of the times His hands were used for blessing. Here are but a few.

Matthew 14:31, Immediately Jesus stretched out His hand and took hold of him,…

Matthew 8:3, Jesus stretched out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” And immediately his leprosy was cleansed.

Mark 1:41, Moved with compassion, Jesus stretched out His hand and touched him.

Luke 5:13, And He stretched out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.”

As our great High Priest, the Lord Christ has all the blessings His people shall ever require, and liberally showers them upon us (Ezekiel 34:26).

As the Hymn writer said,

“There shall be showers of blessing:

This is the promise of love;

There shall be seasons refreshing,

Sent from the Saviour above.”

God is the abundant giver. He gives freely, liberally and without rebuke. He is not in the business of putting us down. He is the Master of encouragement not discouragement. He knows our weakness. He knows our needs and He supplies.

Yes indeed, God is the abundant giver.

He gave Forgiveness;

He gave the New Birth;

He gave Sanctification;

He gave Life;

He gave Eternal Life;

He gave Victory over the grave;

He gave Adoption;

He gave an Everlasting Inheritance;

He gave us all when He gave us Jesus.

God can give us no greater gift than that of Himself and that gift came to us in Christ. Christ is, therefore, the divine treasure house in which the unsearchable riches of Yahweh are stored for His people (Ephesians 3:8). All the abounding grace, all the precious promises and all our royal privileges are treasured up in Him. “For it pleased the Father, that in him should all fulness dwell” (Colossians 1:19).

He is the Giver. His hand is so large, that it contains all things we can possibly need. Like water in a desert oasis, everything that grace touches flourishes.

“His love has no limits, His grace has no measure,

His power no boundary known unto men;

For out of His infinite riches in Jesus

He giveth, and giveth, and giveth again.”

We read, “You open your hand, they are filled with good;” (Psalm 104:28)

That´s generous grace!

He says, “Open your mouth wide, and I will fill it” (Psalm 81:10)

That´s generous grace!

“To him that has, more shall be given” (Matthew 13:12).

That´s generous grace!

We see instances in the Word of God of people desiring too little. There was a man who was told to shoot arrows, but he stopped too soon, and lost part of the blessing (2 Kings 13:18). May we never be like that. Jesus’ hands are giving and filled with blessings for His people. May we never cease to believe that.

If I can borrow a military term, Jesus is our Commissar. We, His army, are feeble and faint in ourselves, but with Jesus as our Provider we will certainly prevail and overcome.

Lastly, the hands of Jesus are open to crown His people. Think about it, hands are needed to perform a coronation. At present, those hands are crowning us with “loving kindness and tender mercies” (Psalm 103:4) and soon will place the crown of glory, life and righteousness upon our heads (1 Peter 5:4; 2 Timothy 4:7-8; James 1:12; Revelation 2:10).

He will soon be back.

And that´s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word: Victory in the Blood

November 23, 2016 Leave a comment

And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony, and they loved not their lives unto the death.

Rev 12:11

When sins devastate our communion with God, there is only one thing powerful enough to overcome all the accusations from Hell, …the Blood of Christ. This is how we overcome. As John Newton wrote,

“Be Thou my shield and hiding place,

That, sheltered near Thy side,

I may my fierce accuser face,

And tell him Thou hast died!”

As we grow in grace, we learn that, in failure, we have new opportunities to become conscious of the blood. When we look to the past, we see the blood. When we think of the present, we see the blood. When we think of the future, we see the blood. When Satan tells us of our defeat, we tell him of his. When he tells us our past, we tell him his. We boldly announce to him that Christ shredded and scattered his demonic troops at the cross, 2000 year ago. We remind him that he was defeated by the blood of the Lamb. We overcome by the blood when we declare what the blood has done. Our Victory is in the BLOOD.

Every spiritual blessing is in Christ! Try this one for size! Though sinners, we are entitled to plead “not guilty” to every charge. Why? Because of the blood. To do anything else would be to deny the reality of the Blood. Though we are guilty, our conscience is as completely at peace. We have learned to apply the Blood. No wonder we can now walk in victory! No longer are we pinned down by the accusing memories that fill us with remorse.

Do you remember the blood offering of Leviticus 4? It was to take care of any sins that were committed through ignorance (Leviticus 4:2). Many believers go about worrying about whether or not they are doing okay. They say to themselves, “Maybe I have not done enough good things?” or ask themselves, “Have I witnessed enough?” or “Have I prayed and given enough?” They are always worried about these things.

But, when Jesus Christ died on the Cross, His blood took care of all the sins that we know about and all those that we don’t know about. He has taken care of all the sins that we have ever and will ever commit. Knowing and applying this brings victory.

When Jesus Christ died and shed His blood, He took care of our sin and our sins. Notice, I said sin (singular) and sins (plural). His Blood legally blotted out our sin nature and covered our sins by casting them into the sea of God’s forgetfulness (Micah 7:19).

“Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin” (Romans 4:7-8). In the Gospel, both sin and sins are dealt with.

Jesus Christ has forever taken care of the sin nature of man by being reckoned as sin and paying the penalty of sin with His blood on the Cross. Jesus, the man, was considered as sin so that we will never have our sins charged to us again. That is victory!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

The Wednesday Word: Beware of Imitations

November 16, 2016 Leave a comment

And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death.

Rev 12:11

The first thing the blood of the Lamb signifies is the death of the Son of God. Our Lord was not only bruised for our iniquities He was also put to death. As He took away our sins, His blood flowed at Calvary. His death is now our victory, our life, and our acquittal. It is the end of our rejection and the securing of our eternity. But beware of imitations. We don’t need Christ the good example. Christ the good example saves no one. If the Christ we believe in is not the Christ of the Cross, He is not the saving Christ who saves by blood. When we read the phrase, “The blood of the Lamb,” we are instantly reminded of the real Christ, the substitutionary sacrifice. His death was ours for He died, the Just for the unjust, to bring us to God (1 Peter 3:18). In the Old Covenant, the sinner brought the lamb and the lamb died in His place. The Lamb was the sinner’s substitute. Today, as we, by faith, bring the Lamb to the Father, we discover that it is the Lamb who actually leads us to God.

As believers, we have the privilege to tell the story that God was manifest in the flesh (1 Timothy 3:16). We are blessed to be able to tell of how He became one of us, a genuine human and died for human sin. In His death, He did not merely make it possible for God to forgive us but He secured forgiveness for all His people. He did not die to make His people saveable, but to actually and definitely save them. Christ came to put away our sin by the sacrifice of Himself (Hebrews 9:26). As He died on the cross, He “finished transgressions, made an end of sin and brought in everlasting righteousness” (Daniel 9:24). What a Victory! There is now, therefore, no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:1). None! This is good news and music to our souls.

Frederick A. Tatford tells of how at a great Parliament of Religions, held in Chicago many years ago, practically every known religion was represented.

During one session, Dr. Joseph Cook, of Boston, suddenly rose and said: “Gentlemen, I beg to introduce to you a woman with a great sorrow. Bloodstains are on her hands, and nothing she has tried will remove them. The blood is that of murder. She has been driven to desperation in her distress. Is there anything in your religion that will eliminate her sin and give her peace?” A hush fell upon the gathering. Not one of the company replied.

Raising his eyes heavenwards, Dr. Cook then cried out, “John, can you tell this woman how to get rid of her awful sin?” The great preacher waited as if listening for a reply. Suddenly he cried, “Listen. John speaks: ’The blood of Jesus Christ, His Son, cleanseth us from all sins’ (I John 1:7).”

Not a soul broke the silence: the representatives of Eastern religions and Western cults sat dumb. In the face of human need, the Gospel of Jesus Christ alone could meet the need. Sin demands blood. Christ provided it.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com

The Wednesday Word: What If? Pt 2

1 Corinthians 15:12-21

Last time we asked the question, “What if Christ had not risen from the dead.” We discovered that, if Christ were not raised, preaching would be pointless, faith would be useless, the disciples were liars, and we cannot rely on the New Testament.

We also began to consider that if Christ were not raised, we are yet in our sins (1 Corinthians 15:17). We are not forgiven. We stated that God, in His holiness, cannot sweep sin under the carpet. He must punish sin! He must punish either the sinner or the sinner’s substitute.

However, if Christ is yet in the grave, this means that the Father did not accept the sacrifice of Calvary. And that means we are yet in our sins! If Christ were not raised from the dead, then the blood saved no one. If Jesus is still in the grave, we have no forgiveness.

But Christ was raised from the dead. The sacrifice of Calvary was accepted. If there had been anything lacking in Christ’s life or death, the Father would have left Him in the grave. In other words, the Resurrection is the Father’s “Amen” to the doing and dying of Christ!

But, what if Christ remained in the grave? According to our passage, it’s serious trouble for believers. If Christ is not risen then those who have fallen asleep (died) in Christ have perished (1 Corinthians 15:18). They are gone, it’s over. Finito!

Furthermore, if Christ is still in the grave, Christianity is a cruel hoax. We have built our hope on the fact that we serve a living, risen Saviour who is coming back for us … but, He’s not coming back for anyone if He’s still in the grave. Those who have died as Christians have perished. We have nothing to look forward to. All we can see is the slow approach of the spindly, icy fingers of death as they prepare to claim us. If Christ is not risen, we are without hope!

But now is Christ risen. He’s off the cross, He’s out of the grave and He’s alive forevermore. That’s worth a strong Hallelujah!

Our God came here in Christ, tackled the strong and steely bars of death and won the victory over it. But, if Christ is not risen from the dead, the future is fearful. We are in misery! What is your future? Where are you headed?

Albert Einstein was a very famous scientist. However, brilliant as he was, the poor man suffered terribly from absent- mindedness. One day as he sat on the train, the conductor approached asking for tickets. Einstein searched in all his pockets without any success. He just couldn’t find his ticket. The kindly conductor said; “It’s all right Professor, I know you well enough to know that you bought a ticket. Don’t worry about it!”

As the conductor turned and walked away, he looked back and saw the good Professor down on his hands and knees searching under the seat. Once more he said; “It’s all right, Professor, I trust you. I know you bought a ticket. Don’t worry about it.” Einstein looked up at the man and said, “I know you know I bought a ticket, but I need to find it because I need to know where I’m going.”

All of us need to know where we are going! We need the assurance that Christ has risen from the grave. We need the confidence that He has conquered death on our behalf.

Do you have that assurance and confidence?

Someone said it like this; “If Jesus stayed in the grave, then nothing really matters. But if Jesus rose from the grave then nothing else matters.”

He is alive. Death is dead. Christ has conquered!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word: What If? Pt 1

My Aunt Eileen died just a few days ago. She was my Father’s younger sister and she will be greatly missed by friends and family.

Death is a sorrowful time for those left behind. However, in spite of the sorrow, for the believer, death and the grave have lost their sting and victory. This is because of the certainty of the Resurrection.

What if, however, Jesus has not risen from the grave?

I’ve recently read some Christian writers who explain that, even if they discovered Jesus did not rise from the dead, they would continue to follow Him. After all, they reason, as they look around at the field of religious Gurus from human history, Jesus is by far the superior one.

Personally, I think that kind of thinking is daft! Indeed, in 1 Corinthians 15:12-21, Paul lets us know just how silly this mentality is. In fact, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul gives us several awful things that would be true if Christ had not risen from the grave.

The first of these is that, if Christ is not risen, preaching would be an exercise in futility (verse 14). I know there are some who would readily endorse that sentiment at the best of times. However, notwithstanding their views on preaching, if there is no Resurrection, the minister is wasting his time being in the pulpit. If Christ is still in the grave there is no good news. No Gospel. The preacher is just a wind-bag!

Also, according to verse 14, if there is no resurrection, our faith is vain. At the end of the day, why would we put faith in a dead Messiah? Faith, as you remember, is only as good as its object. Faith itself saves no one. It is Jesus who saves and a dead Jesus is useless in this matter of salvation. The ghastly truth is that, if Jesus is still in the grave, He can bring no one to heaven. A dead man can do nothing for us!

Now here’s another thing. If Jesus has not risen from the grave, then the disciples were awful liars (v15-16). These men went everywhere telling people they had seen the risen Christ. They had touched and handled Him, they claimed (1John 1:1). But, if Christ was not raised from the dead then they were perjurers. Remember this, if Christ was not risen from the dead, the apostles weren’t just mistaken, they were malicious. They were part of a gargantuan conspiracy to deceive mankind!

So then, were the Apostles liars? If they were, why did they lie? ‘Oh’ says someone, ‘just like any of these modern preachers, they lied for gain.’ But what gain did they have? It certainly was not financial. And, furthermore, consider how they died. They all (except for John) died as martyrs. They were tortured and brutally executed. There’s no worldly gain in that.

By the way, liars and martyrs are not cut from the same cloth. Only deranged lunatics would embrace martyrdom to further a deliberate lie.

But, if Christ is still in the grave, then indeed, the Apostles were liars, hypocrites and deceivers. That would follow then that we cannot read the New Testament since it was written by these same frauds. If Christ is not risen, we, therefore, have no New Testament!

But it gets worse than that; if Christ is yet in the grave, then we have no hope of forgiveness (verse 17). God cannot overlook sin, He must punish it! God is Holy and His holiness demands the death of the sinner. Either our sin has been punished on Christ at the cross or we will be punished for it in Hell. But, if Christ has not been raised from the grave it means that the Father has not accepted the sacrifice of Calvary. That means we are lost. It matters not how sincere and earnest we are. We are yet in our sins. We will perish!

But, here’s the good news. Christ was delivered for our offenses and raised again for (because of) our Justification (Romans 4:25). He is alive. His blood has secured us, His sacrifice has been accepted and He is alive forevermore.

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

To be Continued…….

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

The Wednesday Word – Seeing the Blood

The Bible does not teach that a man is saved by the keeping of rules and regulations, but by the shedding of Blood. At the cross, Jesus bought and paid for us with His blood. To the gospel believer, the blood of Christ is, therefore, amazing. May we never cease to be astonished by the knowledge that He who poured out His blood and died on the cross was God manifest in the flesh (1Timothy 3:16).

The blood has been the centre of divine revelation since the beginning. We first see the blood when an innocent animal was killed to clothe our guilty ancestors. We see the blood in Abel’s sacrifice. We see blood on the doorpost on the night of the Passover. We see blood in the Tabernacle and Temple sacrifices. We see blood in the prophets who foretold that the Messiah would pour out His life (Isaiah 53).

When we see the blood it, therefore, means that we believe what the Father tells us about the death of His Son. Seeing the blood means that we see Christ’s death as our death. Seeing the blood, however, does not mean that we have visions of Christ with blood dripping from His wounded body. How ghoulish! To the contrary, seeing the blood, means we are satisfied that Christ died for us, personally, as our substitute. When we see the blood, we know that He was wounded for our transgressions. In fact, when we see the blood, faith makes redemption personal enabling us to say, “He was wounded for MY transgressions, He was bruised for MY iniquities” (Isaiah 53:5).

This is what is meant by seeing the blood and by seeing it we have victory.

In all the sacrifices of the Old Testament, the shedding of the blood was the infliction of death. In Genesis 9:4, the life and blood are equated. In Leviticus17:11, the blood made atonement for the soul. This blood shedding or life-taking was the payment for the penalty of sin. We read, “The soul that sins, it shall die”(Ezekiel 18:20), and “The wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). So when Christ hung upon the cross, He did so as the great offering for sins. He poured out His soul unto death (Isaiah 53:12). This is God’s perfect ultimate and only sacrifice with which He is satisfied forever!

Since the Father is satisfied with the doing and dying of the Son, so should we be! Since Christ died for us, we have the certainty of eternal life. Since He was punished in our stead, that means we cannot now be punished. God, being just, will not punish Christ first, and then punish us afterwards for the same crimes. Our Saviour died; the Lamb was slain and we are now free from the possibility of God’s wrath. We can walk through this life secure. God is not out to get us. There are no thunderbolts from heaven being hurled at us. There are no flames of hell yawning wide for us since Christ has paid and suffered for us. Do you believe this?

Right standing before God is now altogether by the blood of Christ and has nothing whatsoever to do with how we behave. Regardless of the rules for acceptance so often imposed upon us by religious people, we will never be any more righteous than the blood of Christ has made us.”

Amazing grace! ’tis heav’n below
To feel the blood applied,
And Jesus, only Jesus know,
My Jesus crucified.
The cleansing stream I see, I see!
I plunge, and oh, it cleanseth me!
Oh! praise the Lord, it cleanseth me,
It cleanseth me, yes, cleanseth me!

And that’s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com 

Commentary on Romans 8:1

Chapter 8

C. We have victory over the flesh through the indwelling Spirit:

 

This introduction is from Robert Haldane:

“This chapter presents a glorious display of the power of Divine grace, and of the provision which God has made for the consolation of His people. While the Apostle had proved, in the sixth, that his previous doctrine gave no license to believers to continue in sin, he had still kept in view his main purpose of establishing their free justification. In the seventh he had prosecuted the same object, declaring that by their marriage with Christ they were delivered from the law as a covenant of life or death, while he vindicated its character, use, and authority. In this chapter, he continues the subject of justification, and resumes that of the believer’s assurance of his salvation, of which he had spoken in the fifth, establishing it on new grounds; and from the whole train of his argument from the commencement of the Epistle, he now draws the general conclusion, that to them who are in Christ Jesus there is no condemnation. While this could not have been accomplished by the law, he shows that it had been affected by the incarnation of the Son of God, by whom the law has been fulfilled for all who are one with Him as members of His body. Paul next points out the difference of character between those who, being in their natural state under the law and under sin, are carnally-minded; and those who, being renewed by grace, in whom the law has been fulfilled, are spiritually-minded. The condition of the former is death, that of the latter life and peace. Of these last he proceeds, through the remainder of the chapter, to assert the high privileges and absolute security.

Those who are spiritually-minded have the Spirit of Christ, and possess spiritual life. Although their bodies must return to the dust, they shall be raised up again. They are led by the Spirit; they are the sons of God, and in His service are delivered from a spirit of bondage. They look to Him as their Father; are heirs of God and joint-heirs with Jesus Christ. To encourage believers to sustain the sufferings to which, while in this world, they are exposed, the most varied and abundant consolations are exhibited. Their salvation is declared to have taken its rise in the eternal counsels of God, by whom, through all its steps, it is carried into effect. Their condemnation, then, is impossible; for who shall condemn those whom God justifieth, — for whom Christ died, and rose, and intercedes? The Apostle concludes by defying the whole universe to separate believers from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. In this manner he follows out, in this chapter, what had been his grand object through all the preceding part of the Epistle.” [20]

 

Rom 8:1 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

 

The word “therefore” does not mark or draw a conclusion just from the few verses that preceded this verse, but is the conclusion of the first seven chapters of this epistle. Paul has shown that believers are dead to the law and married to another by the substitutionary sacrifice of Christ. Not only that, but God has justified us by faith in Christ, who bore our sins, so that we have been declared legally just, by an imputed righteousness. Thus there is now no condemnation to them who are in Christ. The Greek word used here for “condemnation” occurs only three times in the New Testament and every instance is in Romans [5:16, 18]. This word is the opposite of the word justification. It is a judicial word signifying the verdict of the guilt and the penalty that verdict demands.

Since the sins of those who are in Christ have been paid for by Christ and his righteousness has been imputed to them, then they can never again be condemned before God’s judgment seat, though they sin again. No sin that the believer could commit will ever reverse the decision that was made in their case. Romans 8:33-39 will clarify what I have just said. Also Ephesians 1:7 states: “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace;” We have forgiveness of sins according to the riches of God’s grace and since God’s grace is a storehouse of grace that is without measure, then we could never exhaust it.

The words “to them which are in Christ Jesus” mean those who have been born again and have been adopted into the family by the regenerating power of the Holy Ghost. Those that have been given a new or second birth are not condemned before God’s judgment seat. This is in contrast to all those who do not know him. As we shown in Romans 1 that all Gentiles are condemned before God and in Romans 2 all Jews are condemned before God. In Romans 3 Paul declared that all were condemned before God, but those who are in Christ Jesus are no longer condemned, because Christ is their Surety. He paid their penalty for their sins and his righteousness has been given to them.

The later part that states: “who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit” is not found in the most ancient manuscripts and is thought by many scholars today to be interpolated. To interpolate means to add to a text in order to alter or corrupt the meaning of the text. But even though I do not believe it to be part of the actual text, I will still comment on this portion of scripture.

Many interpret this to mean that those Christians who somehow live a complete holy life with no sin will be those who are not condemned before God. But this teaching does great damage to the doctrine of justification by faith alone. We are not justified by our works, but are justified by faith in Christ. I am not saying that faith has no good works, but we that are born again and regenerated by the power of the Spirit are not trying to be justified, but are already justified. Also Paul has already explained in Romans seven that believers in Christ will struggle with sin as long as they are in this body. So to be in the flesh is to be unregenerate. Again in Romans eight here, Paul will declare that those that are in the flesh cannot please God.

What is Paul talking about then when he contrasts walking in the flesh with walking in the Spirit? I believe as many other commentators believe that Paul is contrasting the works of the law with being justified by the Spirit. In other words there is therefore now no condemnation in those who are not seeking to make them selves righteous by law works, but who are seeking their righteousness by grace through faith in Christ. In Romans 4:1-2 Paul asks this: “What shall we say then that Abraham our father, as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? For if Abraham were justified by works, he hath whereof to glory; but not before God.” See here how walking in the flesh doesn’t necessarily mean that someone wasn’t trying to live a holy life, but instead depicts someone who is trying to be righteous by the works of the law. Another example is Galatians 3:3 “Are ye so foolish? Having begun in the Spirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh?” Paul is rebuking the Galatians for going back to law works and this is described as trying to work out a righteousness in them selves which is described by the word flesh. Robert Haldane states: “In this passage the word flesh cannot be taken for wicked works, any more than in the fourth chapter of the Romans, just quoted. It must be understood in the sense of working for life, or self-justification, in opposition to the way of salvation according to the Gospel. The Apostle’s main object, in the whole of that Epistle, is to reclaim the Galatian churches from the error of mixing ceremonial observances, or any works of law, with the faith of Christ, and thus walking according to the flesh, and not according to the Spirit. ‘Behold, I Paul say unto you, that if ye be circumcised, Christ shall profit you nothing. For I testify again to every man that is circumcised, that he is a debtor to do the whole law. Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from (the doctrine of) grace.” [21]

Again Philippians 3:3 Paul states: “For we are the circumcision, who worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh.” This example and many others can be used to show that the word flesh doesn’t always mean wicked works. Also since Paul has been arguing through this entire epistle that we are not justified by the works of the law but by faith in Christ, then I believe when he concludes his arguments from the first seven chapters, here in verse one of chapter eight, he is not speaking of someone who is living an ungodly life when he uses the word flesh, but is depicting someone who is trying to become righteous through their own works. Therefore Paul is saying, “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who is not trying to make them selves righteous through the flesh, but who has been regenerated by the Spirit.

This interpretation is in contrast to what many say today. They will read Romans eight here and teach that those that are not under condemnation are those who are not committing sin by not walking in the flesh, but again I say that this doctrine destroys the whole doctrine of justification by faith because it teaches that in order to be righteous you must do something besides being in Christ.

Let me add a little note here: Many when interpreting scripture interpret scripture with the same definition of a word that is given in the English Bible. In other words when they see the word “world,” they will define it the same way every time. The word “world” carries seven different definitions through out scripture. John 1:10 alone has the word “world” three times and all three times it has a different definition. In Romans Paul has used the word “law” in six different ways or with six different definitions. So it is here with the word “flesh.” The word “flesh” is almost always in the negative, but the scriptures use it in the positive to. In Ezekiel11:19and 36:26 the word flesh is used as a synonym for being regenerated or born again. Ezekiel says: “And I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within you; and I will take the stony heart out of their flesh, and will give them a heart of flesh:”

So you see that the word “flesh” does not always mean to walk in wicked works. But Paul uses it many times in his epistles to speak of someone who isn’t righteous through imputation, but instead those who are trying to make them selves righteous through their own works in the flesh. Paul contrasts the regenerate with the unregenerate. Those who walk in the spirit are regenerated. Those who walk in the flesh are the unregenerate.

This comes from a “Commentary on Romans” by Hershel Lee Harvell Jr.

 

20)  This comes from Robert Haldane’s Introduction on Romans Chapter 8 found in the Master Christian Library Version 8 put out by Ages Software Copyrighted 2000-2003.

21) This comes from Robert Haldane’s comment on Romans Chapter 8 verse 4 found in the Master Christian Library Version 8 put out by Ages Software Copyrighted 2000-2003.