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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 114

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

WESTWOOD, May. 22, 1881.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I am extremely sorry that I cannot come out to-night. I would not give a lame excuse, but, alas, my being lame is the hindrance. I am hardly able to keep out of bed, and to make a journey to Stockwell is quite beyond me.

I think on such a theme as your noble help to the Orphanage I could have risen to eloquence, but Mr. Olney who is always eloquent will make up for me in that direction. I should, however, have said how glad I am personally to see you treading in your father’s footsteps, and doing in many ways that which would have filled the good old man’s heart with delight.

I am personally obliged to you and Mrs. Barrow for helping the Stockwell Orphanage, and in signing my name to the Testimonial, I can truly say, I did it with all my heart.

God bless and prosper you very abundantly. You will, I know, excuse a cripple. My heart is with the gathering of the evening, though my legs will not carry me into its midst. Peace be to all.

My kindest regards are hereby sent to you and Mrs. Barrow.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 113

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, June 23, ‘80.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I could not get back again to your meeting last night for I had to start two others and make a speech at each; and at last my legs gave in and would not carry me about any longer.

I thank you with all my heart, and Mrs. Barrow too. May success attend you and God’s best blessing. You have done me a great and special service and you have done it so heartily that it is a pleasure to be under obligations to you.

Is there anything for me to do by way of acknowledgment to donors? I wrote Mr. H , and Mrs. H. sends £5 for herself, and £10 for Mr. H. — . Is this a new donation? or is it a part of your list?

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 112

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Aug. 5, ‘79.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I am most grateful for your offer of a house and I see no sort ‘of reason why you should not nominate as you wish — with the proviso that they meet our rules as to being destitute, healthy, and between 6 and 10, besides being legitimate and not deformed.

What a kind friend you are! I pray the Lord reward you for all this according to His grace.

I have seen Mr. Page and had a long interview; you will soon receive draft.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Concerning this blog

April 11, 2017 2 comments

I appreciate everyone who follows this blog. As you all know my hours were cut last October and therefore that has forced me to make a change in my vocation, in order to take care of my family. Starting two weeks from now all that will appear on this blog will be nothing but quotes from church leaders of the past. It will take me several months to get on my feet in my new profession.

So again, I appreciate those who follow and read this blog. Be patient with me as I adjust to my new means of making a living.

God bless,

Hershel

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 111

To [Mr. W. Higgs, Sen.].

MENTONE, Jan. 20, 1892.

MY DEAR FRIEND,—

The sun shines at length, and now! hope to get on. I have not been up to the mark the last few days, and I have a little gout in the right hand which makes it hard to write; but I shall soon get over it ….

I wired Prince of Wales, and had a telegram back, which I did not expect. Shall be right glad to see you. Mrs. S. is pretty well.

Yours very lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 110

To [Mr. W. Higgs, Sen.].

MENTONE, Thursday, Dec. 4, ‘90.

DEAR FRIEND,—

You are a delight to me at every remembrance of you. Receive my love, and give as much of it as you like to your wife, your mother, and your sisters and all the clan.

I thank you for entertaining our friends at the Baths. May more come next Sunday.

My hand is not yet so light as it should be, and to write is a painful task. Still it is better, or I could not be scribbling this screed. I sleep nicely, and have been out driving most days, and so I am mending soundly if not swiftly. I have had a hard grind, and I hope it will sharpen me. I wish I could see you.

Remember me to every deacon. I cannot yet write much; will they take it as done until this unworthy right hand gets well.

I like to hear how all goes on. Stir up brethren to write. T. O. sent a very cheering telegram. J P___ nice letter.

My dear wife seems out of the world rather. She has felt the cold bitterly.

It rains to-day, and Mrs. Bernard laughs because I propose to pay her only when the sun shines!

God bless you and yours.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 109

To [Mr. W. Higgs, Sen.].

MENTONE, Dec. 27, 1888.

DEAR BROTHER WILL,—

We are getting on as happily as we can expect to do without you and your wife. Weather sometimes weeping, sometimes smiling. I am well as far down as the knees; but my feet are not models yet. The swelling is nothing like what it was, but the ankles are so weak. It is only weakness. You know I was always a little weak in the head, and as it is running to the other part I hope the head will be the clearer. I want to come home, but I must wait till the bearers of the house will sustain me.

Remember me to all the angels at Gwydyr and to your own especial cherub and cherubim. To all the Tabernacle brethren give my hearty love.

We have a very nice family party here to prayer every morning. They ask to come and seem to enjoy it greatly. I have expounded all through John’s Gospel, and it has been good for me, if for no one else. The Lord prosper your business in 1889 beyond every previous year, and give your soul prosperity in a still greater measure.

Yours lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.