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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 139

TO REV. A. G. BROWN

CLAPHAM.

LOVING BROTHER, —

I thank you much for preaching for me, praying for me, and loving me. I am better, but have had a sharp nip. Lucian says,” I thought a cobra had bitten me, and filled my veins with poison; but it was worse, — it was gout.” That was written from experience, I know. Yet I bless God for this suffering also, and believe that your prophetic card will be truer than Dr. Cureming’s vaticinations.

Yours ever lovingly,

C. H. S.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 138

TO REV. A. G. BROWN

CLAPHAM, January 29.

DEAR BROTHER, —

Three cheers for you, my true-hearted comrade! The story of your East London gathering of the clans fills me with delight. The Lord be with thee, thou mighty man of valor! Whether, in striking the Spiritualists, you are hitting the devil or a donkey, does not matter much; you have evidently hit hard, or they would not be so fierce. I am not able to take much credit for bringing you up, but I am about as proud of you as I dare be.

I hope we shall have a good meeting on Friday week. It is oil to my bones to see you all.

Yours always lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 137

TO MR. JOSHUA KEEVIL

WESTWOOD, Aug. 30, 1890.

DEAR MR. KEEVIL,—

What a patriarchal family you are — here is Joshua sending me a letter from Noah, containing news about Enoch and Job and his girls. It makes me feel proud to be in such ancient company.

God bless you all. I will send Noah a receipt. Like his namesake, he seems to have had enough rain.

Well, we shall get home. You are a good soul. May the Lord give you the double portion, as he did Job!

Yours heartily ever,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 136

September 28, 2017 Leave a comment

TO MR. JOSHUA KEEVIL

WESTWOOD, July 30, 1889.

DEAR MR. KEEVIL, —

We are greatly indebted to you for the loan of the horse, for so long; but we are both of opinion that we ought to pay something. We are more than willing to do so. You are kindness itself, but I don’t see why you should find a horse for me.

In any case we thank you heartily for your perpetual kindnesses, and we value beyond all price the love from which they flow. The Lord reward you according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.

Yours in deep gratitude,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 135

September 21, 2017 Leave a comment

TO MR. JOSHUA KEEVIL

WESTWOOD, April 5, 1888.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Where shall I find another heart so true, or warm as yours? I have been made ill by the heavy strain upon me, but love like yours is a cordial medicine. God bless you, dear Mr. Keevil! Your noble gift will help to bring up the Supper Gifts to an amount which will cheer my heart …. Thank you a thousand times over. I pray the Lord to prosper you, and bless your substance.

How kind of you to take in so many men! They will get plenty of corn and clover.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 134

September 14, 2017 Leave a comment

TO MR. JOSHUA KEEVIL

WESTWOOD, June 19, 1886.

DEAR MR. KEEVIL, —

The grey deserves all you can say about it; but why should you give me a horse? It is a great deal too much. I feel as if I must not take so large a gift of you.

I am ready to buy it of you at a price, and thank you. Please let me have it for a while, and then we can have this matter over. Meanwhile the best of God’s blessings rest upon you for ever.

This is my birthday, but no one else proposes such a gift. There seems to be only one Keevil. God bless him.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 133

September 7, 2017 Leave a comment

TO MR. JOSHUA KEEVIL

WESTWOOD, April 15, 1885.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I am very grateful for the check. The Lord prosper you.

I cannot come to your Mission. At coming home I find so much in arrears that I must peg away very hard to get at all straight, and cannot think of anything outside.

My hearty love to your good Aunt. May the Lord bless her.

Your zeal for the Lord is a great joy to me. May your Hall be made magnificent by the King of mercy.

I shall be very sorry to part with you. I hoped to have your personal service in the church in years to come. Still, do what is best for the whole Church of Christ; and I think that will involve your joining with Mr. Douglas. It will be a loss to me, but a gain to the cause of God in that place. I leave you to your own prayerful judgment, praying our Lord to direct you in going or in remaining as the case may be. My heart rejoices in Mr. Douglas, and I would lose much to help him.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.