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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 214

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Canon Palmer].

[Undated.]

DEAR SIR, —

I am exceedingly obliged by your prompt and Christian reply. I felt it needful to make my protest against the bell-ringing somewhat strong, that I might not appear to be asking a favor merely, but claiming a right not to be disturbed. Otherwise, the lapse of years gives right to a custom against which no protest is entered. This, and no unfriendliness to you, prompted what you considered to be a threat. I can only hope that future correspondence may be, on my part, on a more pleasant subject, and, on your part, may be in the same generous tone.

Yours very heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 216

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Canon Palmer].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, July 4.

DEAR SIR, —

I beg to call your attention to the great disturbance caused by the ringing of a bell, at St. Gabriel’s Church, while the congregation at the Tabernacle is engaged in prayer. I reminded your predecessor that no right of bellringing belongs to any but a parish church, and informed him that I really must appeal to the law to stop the needless nuisance. He very kindly reduced the evil to the minimum, and I no longer objected. I am sure it is far from me to wish to interfere with the peculiar habits of my neighbors; but when many hundreds of persons, met to worship God, are disturbed by the clanging of a loud bell, it compels me to complain. The hours when we are at worship are at 11 and 6.30 on Sunday, and from 7 to 8.30 p.m. On Monday and Thursday.

Wishing to be upon good terms with all in the parish, I trust that you will not allow the bell-ringer to disturb us further, but will substitute a few strokes for the many which are now given.

I am,

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 215

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

BENMORE, July, 1880.

MY DEAR HARRALD,—

Thank you for your notes which tell me no more than is needful and all that I want to know. I will send the receipt to Mr. C. I suppose there will be 16 pages of accounts extra. If there should be need for more small print for the Magazine one of Mr. Dawe’s “Apostles” can be inserted. I did the notes easily and I thank you for so admirably forming the backbone of them. I am greatly enjoying my holiday and I wish you could have one also, but I fear it will not be till late, for we shall soon be in the throes of moving. I am writing with a patent pen which carries its own ink, but I don’t think much of it, for it seems to me to be very indistinct and more like a pencil than a pen. Have you heard how Miss C. gets on, and whether she is with Mr. H.? Peace be ever with you.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 214

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Rev. J. W. Harrald].

[Undated.]

DEAR MR. HARRALD, —

I think your having a wife would not quite preclude your being sent out to South Australia. Passage would be paid for both, I think. I am not, however, sure of this, and of course a single man would be preferred. As to moving to some English sphere. I must leave that with yourself. I am sure you will be useful wherever you go. When you feel you ought to leave you shall have my best aid in finding another sphere. I fear your leaving Shoreham would destroy what you have built up, and if this be a wellgrounded fear I would urge you to remain. In any case we should try to meet with a fit successor, before we shifted ground. May our Lord direct you evermore. Present my kindest regards to Mrs. Harrald.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 213

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

To [Dr. David Brown].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, May 11 [1877].

DEAR SIR, —

I have to apologize for having troubled you twice about so small a matter as your autograph; but the fact is, I did not recognize Dr. David Brown of Duncan’s Memoir as the David Brown of The Commentary. Pray excuse me. I am getting to fear and tremble about the Browns. You must know that the President and Vice-President of our Baptist Union are both Browns, and that the Chairman of our London Association is also a Brown. “Browns to right of us, Browns to left of us, etc.” God bless them all!

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 212

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

Letter from Rev. C. H. Spurgeon sent with a Study Table used by him during the first fifteen years of his ministry in London.

CLAPHAM, Nov. 16, ‘71.

DEAR MR. GOLDSTON,—

Warranty of Table.

This is to certify that the table this day sent to Mr. Goldston has never been known to turn, twist, dance, fly up into the air or otherwise misbehave. It has not been addicted to convivial habits and has never been known to be on a roar. As a most studious piece of furniture it is sent to a studious man with the kind regards of

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 211

TO VARIOUS FRIENDS

Written to a venerable friend in his eighty-ninth year, in answer to a message of gratitude for a sermon.

MY DEAR BROTHER, —

I thank you for your word of good cheer. It is a great joy to be the means of comfort to an aged believer. You will very likely get home before I shall, but tell them I am coming as fast as the gout will let me. The Lord will not leave you now that hoary hairs have come, but will now carry you in His bosom. Peace be unto you!

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.