Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Comment’

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 174

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

WESTWOOD, May 24, 1884.

DEAR FRIEND, —

May you be sustained under your heavy trial! Now that you and your dear companion are most fully realizing the void which is made in your household, may you find living consolations flowing into your hearts! “It is well,” and faith knows it is so; and worships the Lord from under the cloud. How time has flown! It seems but the other day that you were married; and now you are an old father, bereaved of a daughter. Dear Caleb Higgs, too, is gone home long ago.

We shall meet above before long. Till then, in our Lord’s business we will find solace, and in Himself delight.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Advertisements

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 173

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mrs. Higgs].

WESTWOOD, January 6, 1883.

DEAR MRS. HIGGS, —

L____ and G____ have now told me all about our dear one’s death. The Lord has dealt well with him. I wonder how he lived so long to cheer us all: and I feel relieved that he lived no longer, for it would have been great anguish to him. He has gone at the right time. The Lord will be your comfort and help. I meant to go to you this morning, but I found my foot would not let me go up and down steps. It is a double pain to be kept from you and your sorrowing family …. We shall all meet again Let us bless God. Can we?

Your loving friend,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 172

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mr. Thomas H. Olney].

NIGHTINGALE LANE, October, 1875.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I could not say much to Mr. M____, for I felt stunned by the tidings of your brother’s death, and could not realize it; indeed, I cannot now.

God bless you, beloved brother; and as He comes so very near in solemn deeds, may He come just as near in love! Peace be to you in the hour of sore amazement!

I send my deepest sympathies to the bereaved wife. I can do no better than pray that she may now be very graciously sustained. If she can calmly bow before the Lord, it will be for her own good. Grief so natural, and so likely to prove excessive, must be restrained for the sake of herself and babes.

God help her, poor soul! What a loss is hers!

Yours lovingly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 171

WORDS OF SYMPATHY

To [Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spurgeon].

WESTWOOD, Sept. 11, 1890.

MY DEAR CHILDREN,—

The Lord Himself comfort you. I want comforting myself. To think of that dear little creature being taken away! It must be right! It must be goody Our Father is never mistaken nor unkind.

You are acting wisely in not bringing the little one from the place. You will be setting an example of common sense which is greatly needed in an age which is so sentimental as it is false-hearted.

If you would like a wreath from me, kindly order it in Herne Bay, and send the bill to me. I would try to send one, but if you are not going to have any, I should be setting an ill example.

I feel sure you will both find a secret strength poured into your souls, and in this also faith shall have the victory.

I shall never forget the day. For a wonder your dear mother went with me to the Orphanage, and was very happy. We came home, and the telegram came at once, — just the bitter herbs with the feast.

To you it must be a sharp cut; but our Lord has an almighty salve.

Your loving father,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Updated: Free Ebooks Page

Just wanted to let you all know that my Free Ebooks Page has been updated. All links have been checked and a lot of new titles have been added. I hope you enjoy.

If you find a broken link, then please let me know. Thanks.

Categories: Comment Tags: , , ,

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 170

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, Nov. 8, 1890.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Hearty thanks for notes better than those of the Bank. I shall try to issue notes on Genesis like your notes. Any on the first six chapters greatly valued.

My head! My head!

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 169

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, Oct. 17, 1890.

DEAR FRIEND,—

The Lord be with you! My grievous trial in the striking down of W. Olney makes me ask your loving sympathy. What shall I do? The Lord will be with me.

I am grateful for your papers for S. & T., which I will use by degrees. Narratives are the scarcest and most useful sort of articles.

May you have a grand time at Tabernacle when I am away!

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.